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1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Chartres
Chartres
(French pronunciation: ​[ʃaʁtʁ]) is a commune and capital of the Eure-et-Loir
Eure-et-Loir
department in France. It is located 96 km (60 mi) southwest of Paris. Chartres
Chartres
is famous world-wide for its cathedral.

Contents

1 History 2 Climate 3 Population 4 Geography 5 Main sights

5.1 Cathedrals and churches 5.2 Museums 5.3 Other sights

6 Economy

6.1 Transport

7 Sport 8 Diocese

8.1 Pilgrimages 8.2 Bishops

9 Notable people 10 International relations

10.1 Twin towns – Sister cities

11 Gallery 12 See also 13 References 14 External links

History[edit] Chartres
Chartres
was in Gaul
Gaul
one of the principal towns of the Carnutes, a Celtic tribe. In the Gallo-Roman
Gallo-Roman
period, it was called Autricum, name derived from the river Autura (Eure), and afterwards civitas Carnutum, "city of the Carnutes", from which Chartres
Chartres
got its name. The city was burned by the Normans
Normans
in 858, and unsuccessfully besieged by them in 911. During the Middle Ages, it was the most important town of the Beauce. It gave its name to a county which was held by the counts of Blois, and the counts of Champagne, and afterwards by the House of Châtillon, a member of which sold it to the Crown in 1286. In 1417, during the Hundred Years' War, Chartres
Chartres
fell into the hands of the English, from whom it was recovered in 1432. In 1528, it was raised to the rank of a duchy by Francis I. In 1568, during the Wars of Religion, Chartres
Chartres
was unsuccessfully besieged by the Huguenot
Huguenot
leader, the Prince of Condé. It was finally taken by the royal troops of Henry IV on 19 April 1591. On Sunday, 27 February 1594, the cathedral of Chartres
Chartres
was the site of the coronation of Henry IV after he converted to the Catholic faith, the only king of France
France
whose coronation ceremony was not performed in Reims. In 1674, Louis XIV raised Chartres
Chartres
from a duchy to a duchy peerage in favor of his nephew, Duke Philippe II of Orléans. The title of Duke of Chartres
Chartres
was hereditary in the House of Orléans, and given to the eldest son of the Duke of Orléans. In the 1870-1871 Franco-Prussian War, Chartres
Chartres
was seized by the Germans on 2 October 1870, and continued during the rest of the war to be an important centre of operations. In World War II, the city suffered heavy damage by bombing and during the battle of Chartres
Chartres
in August 1944, but its cathedral was spared by an American Army officer who challenged the order to destroy it.[1] On 16 August 1944, Colonel Welborn Barton Griffith, Jr. questioned the necessity of destroying the cathedral and volunteered to go behind enemy lines to find out whether the Germans were using it as an observation post. With his driver, Griffith proceeded to the cathedral and, after searching it all the way up its bell tower, confirmed to Headquarters that it was empty of Germans. The order to destroy the cathedral was withdrawn. Colonel Griffith was killed in action later on that day in the town of Lèves, 3.5 kilometres (2.2 miles) north of Chartres.[1][2] For his heroic action both at Chartres
Chartres
and Lèves, Colonel Griffith received, posthumously, several decorations awarded by the President of the United States and the U.S. Military, and also from the French government[3] Following deep reconnaissance missions in the region by the 3rd Cavalry Group and units of the 1139 Engineer Combat Group, and after heavy fighting in and around the city, Chartres
Chartres
was liberated, on 18 August 1944, by the U.S. 5th Infantry and 7th Armored Divisions belonging to the XX Corps of the U.S. Third Army commanded by General George S. Patton.[4] Climate[edit]

Climate data for Chartres
Chartres
(1981–2010 averages)

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Record high °C (°F) 16.1 (61) 18.5 (65.3) 23.7 (74.7) 28.2 (82.8) 31.4 (88.5) 36.3 (97.3) 40.1 (104.2) 39.6 (103.3) 33.7 (92.7) 29.4 (84.9) 20.9 (69.6) 17.0 (62.6) 40.1 (104.2)

Average high °C (°F) 6.4 (43.5) 7.6 (45.7) 11.5 (52.7) 14.7 (58.5) 18.4 (65.1) 21.8 (71.2) 24.6 (76.3) 24.6 (76.3) 20.9 (69.6) 15.9 (60.6) 10.2 (50.4) 6.7 (44.1) 15.3 (59.5)

Average low °C (°F) 1.2 (34.2) 1.0 (33.8) 3.2 (37.8) 4.8 (40.6) 8.3 (46.9) 11.2 (52.2) 13.2 (55.8) 13.1 (55.6) 10.4 (50.7) 7.8 (46) 4.1 (39.4) 1.8 (35.2) 6.7 (44.1)

Record low °C (°F) −18.4 (−1.1) −15.0 (5) −11.0 (12.2) −4.9 (23.2) −1.0 (30.2) 1.4 (34.5) 0.9 (33.6) 3.0 (37.4) 0.5 (32.9) −5.4 (22.3) −11.3 (11.7) −14.2 (6.4) −18.4 (−1.1)

Average precipitation mm (inches) 49.2 (1.937) 40.2 (1.583) 44.4 (1.748) 45.0 (1.772) 54.7 (2.154) 48.2 (1.898) 56.5 (2.224) 43.0 (1.693) 46.9 (1.846) 62.3 (2.453) 52.2 (2.055) 56.3 (2.217) 598.9 (23.579)

Average precipitation days 10.4 9.1 9.7 9.0 9.9 8.0 7.7 6.5 7.7 10.0 10.4 10.8 109.1

Average relative humidity (%) 89 85 80 75 77 76 74 75 79 86 89 90 81.3

Mean monthly sunshine hours 65.7 83.7 135.8 176.1 202.9 222.6 224.5 219.6 177.8 119.2 71.9 58.2 1,758

Source #1: Météo France[5][6]

Source #2: Infoclimat.fr (humidity, 1961–1990)[7]

Population[edit]

Historical population

Year Pop. ±%

1793 15,000 —    

1800 13,794 −8.0%

1806 13,809 +0.1%

1821 13,714 −0.7%

1831 14,439 +5.3%

1836 14,750 +2.2%

1841 16,383 +11.1%

1846 17,353 +5.9%

1851 18,234 +5.1%

1856 18,925 +3.8%

1861 19,531 +3.2%

1866 19,442 −0.5%

1872 19,580 +0.7%

1876 20,468 +4.5%

1881 21,080 +3.0%

1886 21,903 +3.9%

1891 23,108 +5.5%

1896 23,182 +0.3%

1901 23,431 +1.1%

1906 23,219 −0.9%

1911 24,103 +3.8%

1921 23,349 −3.1%

1926 24,630 +5.5%

1931 25,357 +3.0%

1936 27,077 +6.8%

1946 26,422 −2.4%

1954 28,740 +8.8%

1962 31,495 +9.6%

1968 34,469 +9.4%

1975 38,928 +12.9%

1982 37,119 −4.6%

1990 39,595 +6.7%

1999 40,361 +1.9%

2008 39,159 −3.0%

2011 39,273 +0.3%

Geography[edit] Chartres
Chartres
is built on a hill on the left bank of the Eure
Eure
River. Its renowned medieval cathedral is at the top of the hill, and its two spires are visible from miles away across the flat surrounding lands. To the southeast stretches the fertile plain of Beauce, the "granary of France", of which the town is the commercial centre. Main sights[edit] Cathedrals and churches[edit]

Cathedral of Chartres.

The famous " Chartres
Chartres
blue".

South elevation, lithography 1864

The Church of Saint Aignan.

Chartres
Chartres
is best known for its cathedral, the Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres, which is considered one of the finest and best preserved Gothic cathedrals in France
France
and in Europe. Its historical and cultural importance has been recognized by its inclusion on the UNESCO
UNESCO
list of World Heritage Sites. It was built on the site of the former Chartres cathedral
Chartres cathedral
of Romanesque architecture, which was destroyed by fire in 1194 (that former cathedral had been built on the ruins of an ancient Celtic temple, later replaced by a Roman temple). Begun in 1205, the construction of Notre-Dame de Chartres
Chartres
was completed 66 years later. The stained glass windows of the cathedral were financed by guilds of merchants and craftsmen, and by wealthy noblemen, whose names appear at the bottom. It is not known how the famous and unique blue, bleu de Chartres, of the glass was created, and it has been impossible to replicate it. The French author Michel Pastoureau, says that it could also be called bleu de Saint-Denis.[8] The Église Saint-Pierre de Chartres, was the church of the Benedictine
Benedictine
Abbaye Saint-Père-en-Vallée, founded in the 7th century by queen Balthild. At time of its construction, the abbey was outside the walls of the city. It contains fine stained glass and, formerly, twelve representations of the apostles in enamel, created about 1547 by Léonard Limosin, which now can be seen in the Fine arts museum. Other noteworthy churches of Chartres
Chartres
are Saint-Aignan (13th, 16th and 17th centuries), and Saint-Martin-au-Val (12th century), inside the Saint-Brice hospital.

Museums[edit]

Musée des Beaux-Arts, Fine arts museum, housed in the former episcopal palace adjacent to the cathedral. Le Centre international du vitrail, a workshop-museum and cultural center devoted to stained glass art, located 50 metres (160 feet) from the cathedral. Conservatoire du machinisme et des pratiques agricoles, an agricultural museum. Musée le grenier de l'histoire, history museum specializing in military uniforms and accoutrements, in Lèves, a suburb of Chartres. Muséum des sciences naturelles et de la préhistoire, Natural Science and Prehistory Museum (closed since 2015).

Other sights[edit] The Eure
Eure
River, which at this point divides into three branches, is crossed by several bridges, some of them ancient, and is fringed in places by remains of the old fortifications, of which the Porte Guillaume (14th century), a gateway flanked by towers, was the most complete specimen, until destroyed by the retreating German army in the night of 15 to 16 August 1944. The steep, narrow streets of the old town contrast with the wide, shady boulevards which encircle it and separate it from the suburbs. The "parc André-Gagnon" or "Clos St. Jean", a pleasant park, lies to the north-west, and squares and open spaces are numerous. Part of the Hôtel de Ville (City Hall) is a building of the 17th century called Hôtel de Montescot. The Maison Canoniale dating back to the 13th century, and several medieval and Renaissance houses, are of interest. There is a statue of General Marceau (1769-1796), a native of Chartres and a general during the French Revolution. La Maison Picassiette, a house decorated inside and out with mosaics of shards of broken china and pottery, is also worth a visit. Economy[edit] Chartres
Chartres
is one of the most important market towns in the region of Beauce
Beauce
(known as "the granary of France"). The game pies and other delicacies of Chartres
Chartres
are well known, and the industries also include flour-milling, brewing, distilling, iron-founding, leather manufacture, perfumes, dyeing, and the manufacture of electronic equipment, car accessories, stained glass, billiard requisites and hosiery. Since 1976 fashion and perfumes company Puig has a production plant in this commune.[9] Transport[edit] The Gare de Chartres
Gare de Chartres
railway station offers frequent services to Paris, and a few daily connections to Le Mans, Nogent-le-Rotrou
Nogent-le-Rotrou
and Courtalain. The A11 motorway connects Chartres
Chartres
with Paris
Paris
and Le Mans. Sport[edit] Chartres
Chartres
is home to two semi-professional association football clubs; FC Chartres, who play in the French sixth division, and HB Chartres, who play in the seventh tier. Chartres
Chartres
has a table tennis club which is playing in the Pro A (French First division) and in the European Champions League. The club won the ETTU Cup on the season 2010 – 2011 and it finished at the second position in the French First division. Chartres
Chartres
has the second most important squash club in France. There is also a handball club and it is playing in the French second division. In November 2012, Chartres
Chartres
organized the European Short Course Swimming Championships. Diocese[edit] Main article: Diocese
Diocese
of Chartres The town is the seat of a diocese (bishopric), a prefecture, and a cour d'assises. It has a Tribunal de grande instance, a Tribunal d'instance, a Chamber of commerce
Chamber of commerce
and a branch of the Banque de France. Public and religious schooling from kindergarten through high school and vocational schools is given in mixed (boys and girls) establishments. The two main high schools are the Lycée Jehan de Beauce
Beauce
and the Lycée Marceau, named after two important personages of the history of Chartres: Jehan de Beauce
Beauce
was a 16th-century architect who rebuilt the northern steeple of the cathedral after it had been destroyed by lightning in July 1506, and Marceau, a native of city, who was a general during the French Revolution
French Revolution
of 1789. Pilgrimages[edit] Chartres
Chartres
has been a site of Catholic pilgrimages since the Middle Ages. The poet Charles Péguy
Charles Péguy
(1873–1914) revived the pilgrimage route between Paris
Paris
and Chartres
Chartres
before World War I. After the war, some students carried on the pilgrimage in his memory. Since 1982, the association Notre-Dame de Chrétienté,[10] with offices in Versailles, organizes the annual 100 km (62 mi) pilgrimage on foot from Notre-Dame de Paris
Notre-Dame de Paris
to Notre-Dame de Chartres. About 15,000 pilgrims, from France
France
and countries outside France, participate every year. Bishops[edit] Notable bishops of Chartres:

Fulbert of Chartres (1007–1029) St. Ivo of Chartres
Ivo of Chartres
(1090–1115) John of Salisbury (1176–1180) Érard de La Marck
Érard de La Marck
(1472–1538)

Notable people[edit] Chartres
Chartres
was the birthplace of:

Hélène Boucher
Hélène Boucher
(1908-1934), a French pilot Jacques Pierre Brissot
Jacques Pierre Brissot
(1754–1793), a leading member of the Girondist
Girondist
movement (French Revolution) Julien Cetout footballer Arlette Chabot
Arlette Chabot
(1951-), French journalist Fulcher of Chartres (born around 1059 in or near Chartres), chronicler of the First Crusade Philippe de Dangeau
Philippe de Dangeau
(1638–1720), officer and member of the Académie française Philippe Desportes
Philippe Desportes
(1546–1606), poet Antoine François Desrues
Antoine François Desrues
(1744–1777), poisoner Loïc Duval
Loïc Duval
(born 12 June 1982), professional racingdriver; currently A1 Team France, Formula Nippon
Formula Nippon
and Super GT Julien Escudé
Julien Escudé
(born 1979), professional footballer for Sevilla FC
Sevilla FC
and the France
France
national football team Nicolas Escudé
Nicolas Escudé
(born 1976), professional tennis player André Félibien
André Félibien
(1619–1695), architect and historiographer Achille Guenée
Achille Guenée
(1809–1880), lawyer and entomologist Pierre-Jules Hetzel
Pierre-Jules Hetzel
(1814–1886), editor and publisher Éric Lada footballer François Séverin Marceau-Desgraviers
François Séverin Marceau-Desgraviers
(1769–1796), general Pierre Nicole
Pierre Nicole
(1625–1695), Jansenist theologian Jérôme Pétion de Villeneuve (1756–1794), writer and politician Allison Pineau
Allison Pineau
handball player André Plassart (1889–1978), hellenist, epigrapher and archaeologist Philippe Quintais, (1967-) world championship pétanque player Mathurin Régnier
Mathurin Régnier
(1573–1613), satirist Jacqueline de Romilly
Jacqueline de Romilly
(1913-2010), philologist, classical scholar and fiction writer Benjamin Nivet
Benjamin Nivet
(born 1977), footballer Wandrille Lefèvre
Wandrille Lefèvre
(born 1989), Canadian footballer

International relations[edit] See also: List of twin towns and sister cities in France Twin towns – Sister cities[edit] Chartres
Chartres
is twinned with:

Ravenna
Ravenna
in Italy
Italy
(since 1957) Speyer
Speyer
in Germany
Germany
(since 1959) Chichester
Chichester
in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(since 1959)[11] Bethlehem
Bethlehem
in Palestinian Authority
Palestinian Authority
(since 1995)[12][13] Évora
Évora
in Portugal
Portugal
(since 2003) Cusco
Cusco
in Peru
Peru
(since 1989)[14] Sakurai, Nara
Sakurai, Nara
in Japan
Japan
(since 1989)

Gallery[edit]

Chartres
Chartres
railway station

17th-century engraving of Chartres
Chartres
"skyline"

The cathedral of Chartres

The Apostles and Saint sculptures of Chartres

The Old Town – Eure
Eure
River

Half-timbered house in the Old Town

Hill of Saint François

View south from the cathedral

On the banks of the Eure
Eure
River

See also[edit]

Chartres
Chartres
Cathedral Communes of the Eure-et-Loir
Eure-et-Loir
department Chartres
Chartres
- Champhol
Champhol
Aerodrome

References[edit]

INSEE  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Chartres". Encyclopædia Britannica. 5 (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. p. 954.  Chartres
Chartres
and the Chartres Cathedral
Chartres Cathedral
– Visitor Guide La Maison Picassiette in Chartres

^ a b MilitaryTimes.com. "MilitaryTimes Hall of Valor". Welborn Barton Griffith, Jr. Military Times, a Gannett Company. Retrieved 10 May 2011.  Note: The Distinguished Service Cross was awarded posthumously for saving the cathedral. ^ Jay Nordlinger
Jay Nordlinger
(2011). "A Colonel at Chartres". The Corner. NationalReview.com. Retrieved 11 May 2011.  ^ On 21 October 1944, for his heroic action, Colonel Welborn B. Griffith, Jr. was awarded, posthumously, the Distinguished Service Cross:Hall of Valor: Welborn Barton Griffith, Jr. He was also awarded the Silver Star, the Purple Heart, the Legion of Merit, the French Croix de Guerre
Croix de Guerre
and the Légion d'Honneur: Eugene G. Schulz, The Ghost in General Patton's Third Army, USA, 2012. ISBN 978-1477141441 ^ Winieska, Françoise, August 1944, The Liberation of Rambouillet, France, SHARY, 1999, pp. 19–23, ISBN 2-9514047-0-0 ^ "Données climatiques de la station de Chartres" (in French). Meteo France. Retrieved December 30, 2015.  ^ "Climat Centre-Val de Loire" (in French). Meteo France. Retrieved December 30, 2015.  ^ "Normes et records 1961-1990: Chartres
Chartres
- Champhol
Champhol
(28) - altitude 155m" (in French). Infoclimat. Retrieved December 30, 2015.  ^ Pastoureau, Michel, Bleu: histoire d'une couleur', Seuil, Paris, 2000. ISBN 978-2757840016 ^ "To be multinational in Spain costs a lot, because the domestic market is too small". La Vanguardia. Retrieved May 9, 2012.  ^ Association Notre-Dame de Chrétienté ^ "British towns twinned with French towns [via WaybackMachine.com]". Archant Community Media Ltd. Archived from the original on 5 July 2013. Retrieved 2013-07-20.  ^ "Twinning with Palestine". 1998–2008 The Britain – Palestine Twinning Network. Archived from the original on 28 June 2012. Retrieved 29 November 2008.  ^ ":: Bethlehem
Bethlehem
Municipality::". bethlehem-city.org. Archived from the original on 24 July 2010. Retrieved 10 October 2009.  ^ "Ciudades Hermanas (Sister Cities)" (in Spanish). Municipalidad del Cusco. Archived from the original on 3 August 2009. Retrieved 23 September 2009. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Chartres.

Wikivoyage has a travel guide for Chartres.

Tourist office website City council website (in French) Chartres' archeology service website (in French) Website about archaeological excavations (in French) Visiting Chartres
Chartres
(English) Photo of the abbey church of St.Pierre Music recorded in Chartres Cathedral
Chartres Cathedral
in the resonant space of the labyrinth Chartres
Chartres
World Heritage Site
World Heritage Site
in panographies – 360 degree interactive imaging

v t e

Prefectures of departments of France

Bourg-en-Bresse
Bourg-en-Bresse
(Ain) Laon
Laon
(Aisne) Moulins (Allier) Digne-les-Bains
Digne-les-Bains
(Alpes-de-Haute-Provence) Gap (Hautes-Alpes) Nice
Nice
(Alpes-Maritimes) Privas
Privas
(Ardèche) Charleville-Mézières
Charleville-Mézières
(Ardennes) Foix
Foix
(Ariège) Troyes
Troyes
(Aube) Carcassonne
Carcassonne
(Aude) Rodez
Rodez
(Aveyron) Marseille
Marseille
(Bouches-du-Rhône) Caen
Caen
(Calvados) Aurillac
Aurillac
(Cantal) Angoulême
Angoulême
(Charente) La Rochelle
La Rochelle
(Charente-Maritime) Bourges
Bourges
(Cher) Tulle
Tulle
(Corrèze) Ajaccio
Ajaccio
(Corse-du-Sud) Bastia
Bastia
(Haute-Corse) Dijon
Dijon
(Côte-d'Or) Saint-Brieuc
Saint-Brieuc
(Côtes-d'Armor) Guéret
Guéret
(Creuse) Périgueux
Périgueux
(Dordogne) Besançon
Besançon
(Doubs) Valence (Drôme) Évreux
Évreux
(Eure) Chartres
Chartres
(Eure-et-Loir) Quimper
Quimper
(Finistère) Nîmes
Nîmes
(Gard) Toulouse
Toulouse
(Haute-Garonne) Auch
Auch
(Gers) Bordeaux
Bordeaux
(Gironde) Montpellier
Montpellier
(Hérault) Rennes
Rennes
(Ille-et-Vilaine) Châteauroux
Châteauroux
(Indre) Tours
Tours
(Indre-et-Loire) Grenoble
Grenoble
(Isère) Lons-le-Saunier
Lons-le-Saunier
(Jura) Mont-de-Marsan
Mont-de-Marsan
(Landes) Blois
Blois
(Loir-et-Cher) Saint-Étienne
Saint-Étienne
(Loire) Le Puy-en-Velay
Le Puy-en-Velay
(Haute-Loire) Nantes
Nantes
(Loire-Atlantique) Orléans
Orléans
(Loiret) Cahors
Cahors
(Lot) Agen
Agen
(Lot-et-Garonne) Mende (Lozère) Angers
Angers
(Maine-et-Loire) Saint-Lô
Saint-Lô
(Manche) Châlons-en-Champagne
Châlons-en-Champagne
(Marne) Chaumont (Haute-Marne) Laval (Mayenne) Nancy (Meurthe-et-Moselle) Bar-le-Duc
Bar-le-Duc
(Meuse) Vannes
Vannes
(Morbihan) Metz
Metz
(Moselle) Nevers
Nevers
(Nièvre) Lille
Lille
(Nord) Beauvais
Beauvais
(Oise) Alençon
Alençon
(Orne) Arras
Arras
(Pas-de-Calais) Clermont-Ferrand
Clermont-Ferrand
(Puy-de-Dôme) Pau (Pyrénées-Atlantiques) Tarbes
Tarbes
(Hautes-Pyrénées) Perpignan
Perpignan
(Pyrénées-Orientales) Strasbourg
Strasbourg
(Bas-Rhin) Colmar
Colmar
(Haut-Rhin) Lyon
Lyon
(Rhône) Vesoul
Vesoul
(Haute-Saône) Mâcon
Mâcon
(Saône-et-Loire) Le Mans
Le Mans
(Sarthe) Chambéry
Chambéry
(Savoie) Annecy
Annecy
(Haute-Savoie) Paris
Paris
(Paris) Rouen
Rouen
(Seine-Maritime) Melun
Melun
(Seine-et-Marne) Versailles (Yvelines) Niort
Niort
(Deux-Sèvres) Amiens
Amiens
(Somme) Albi
Albi
(Tarn) Montauban
Montauban
(Tarn-et-Garonne) Toulon
Toulon
(Var) Avignon
Avignon
(Vaucluse) La Roche-sur-Yon
La Roche-sur-Yon
(Vendée) Poitiers
Poitiers
(Vienne) Limoges
Limoges
(Haute-Vienne) Épinal
Épinal
(Vosges) Auxerre
Auxerre
(Yonne) Belfort
Belfort
(Territoire de Belfort) Évry (Essonne) Nanterre
Nanterre
(Hauts-de-Seine) Bobigny
Bobigny
(Seine-Saint-Denis) Créteil
Créteil
(Val-de-Marne) Cergy, Pontoise
Pontoise
(Val-d'Oise)

Overseas departments

Basse-Terre
Basse-Terre
(Guadeloupe) Fort-de- France
France
(Martinique) Cayenne
Cayenne
(French Guiana) Saint-Denis (Réunion) Mamoudzou
Mamoudzou
(Mayotte)

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Communes of the Eure-et-Loir
Eure-et-Loir
department of France
France

Abondant Allaines-Mervilliers Allainville Allonnes Alluyes Amilly Anet Ardelles Ardelu Argenvilliers Aunay-sous-Auneau Aunay-sous-Crécy Auneau-Bleury-Saint-Symphorien Les Autels-Villevillon Authon-du-Perche Baigneaux Bailleau-Armenonville Bailleau-le-Pin Bailleau-l'Évêque Barjouville Barmainville Baudreville La Bazoche-Gouet Bazoches-en-Dunois Bazoches-les-Hautes Beauche Beaumont-les-Autels Beauvilliers Belhomert-Guéhouville Berchères-les-Pierres Berchères-Saint-Germain Berchères-sur-Vesgre Bérou-la-Mulotière Béthonvilliers Béville-le-Comte Billancelles Blandainville Boissy-en-Drouais Boissy-lès-Perche Boisville-la-Saint-Père Boncé Boncourt Bonneval Bouglainval Le Boullay-les-Deux-Églises Le Boullay-Mivoye Le Boullay-Thierry La Bourdinière-Saint-Loup Boutigny-Prouais Bouville Bréchamps Brezolles Briconville Brou Broué Brunelles Bû Bullainville Bullou Cernay Challet Champhol Champrond-en-Gâtine Champrond-en-Perchet Champseru La Chapelle-d'Aunainville La Chapelle-du-Noyer La Chapelle-Forainvilliers La Chapelle-Fortin Chapelle-Guillaume Chapelle-Royale Charbonnières Charonville Charpont Chartainvilliers Chartres Chassant Châtaincourt Châteaudun Châteauneuf-en-Thymerais Les Châtelets Les Châtelliers-Notre-Dame Châtenay Chaudon Chauffours La Chaussée-d'Ivry Cherisy Chuisnes Cintray Clévilliers Cloyes-les-Trois-Rivières Coltainville Combres Commune nouvelle d'Arrou Conie-Molitard Corancez Cormainville Les Corvées-les-Yys Le Coudray Coudray-au-Perche Coudreceau Coulombs Courbehaye Courville-sur-Eure Crécy-Couvé Croisilles La Croix-du-Perche Crucey-Villages Dambron Dammarie Dampierre-sous-Brou Dampierre-sur-Avre Dancy Dangeau Dangers Denonville Digny Donnemain-Saint-Mamès Dreux Droue-sur-Drouette Écluzelles Écrosnes Eole-en-Beauce Épeautrolles Épernon Ermenonville-la-Grande Ermenonville-la-Petite Escorpain Les Étilleux Faverolles Favières Le Favril La Ferté-Vidame Fessanvilliers-Mattanvilliers Flacey Fontaine-la-Guyon Fontaine-les-Ribouts Fontaine-Simon Fontenay-sur-Conie Fontenay-sur-Eure La Framboisière Francourville Frazé Fresnay-le-Comte Fresnay-le-Gilmert Fresnay-l'Évêque Frétigny Friaize Fruncé Gallardon Garancières-en-Beauce Garancières-en-Drouais Garnay Gas Gasville-Oisème La Gaudaine Le Gault-Saint-Denis Gellainville Germainville Gilles Gohory Gommerville Gouillons Goussainville Guainville Le Gué-de-Longroi Guilleville Guillonville Hanches Happonvilliers Havelu Houville-la-Branche Houx Illiers-Combray Intréville Jallans Janville Jaudrais Jouy Lamblore Landelles Lanneray Laons Léthuin Levainville Lèves Levesville-la-Chenard Logron Loigny-la-Bataille Lormaye La Loupe Louville-la-Chenard Louvilliers-en-Drouais Louvilliers-lès-Perche Lucé Luigny Luisant Lumeau Luplanté Luray Magny Maillebois Maintenon Mainvilliers Maisons La Mancelière Manou Marboué Marchéville Marchezais Margon Marolles-les-Buis Marville-Moutiers-Brûlé Meaucé Méréglise Mérouville Meslay-le-Grenet Meslay-le-Vidame Le Mesnil-Simon Le Mesnil-Thomas Mévoisins Mézières-au-Perche Mézières-en-Drouais Miermaigne Mignières Mittainvilliers-Vérigny Moinville-la-Jeulin Moléans Mondonville-Saint-Jean Montboissier Montharville Montigny-le-Chartif Montigny-sur-Avre Montireau Montlandon Montreuil Morainville Morancez Moriers Morvilliers Mottereau Moulhard Moutiers Néron Neuvy-en-Beauce Neuvy-en-Dunois Nogent-le-Phaye Nogent-le-Roi Nogent-le-Rotrou Nogent-sur-Eure Nonvilliers-Grandhoux Nottonville Oinville-Saint-Liphard Oinville-sous-Auneau Ollé Orgères-en-Beauce Ormoy Orrouer Ouarville Ouerre Oulins Oysonville Péronville Pierres Les Pinthières Poinville Poisvilliers Pontgouin Poupry Prasville Pré-Saint-Évroult Pré-Saint-Martin Prudemanche Prunay-le-Gillon La Puisaye Le Puiset Puiseux Réclainville Les Ressuintes Revercourt Rohaire Roinville Rouvray-Saint-Denis Rouvres Rueil-la-Gadelière Saint-Ange-et-Torçay Saint-Arnoult-des-Bois Saint-Aubin-des-Bois Saint-Avit-les-Guespières Saint-Bomer Saint-Christophe Saint-Denis-d'Authou Saint-Denis-des-Puits Saint-Denis-les-Ponts Sainte-Gemme-Moronval Saint-Éliph Saint-Éman Saint-Georges-sur-Eure Saint-Germain-le-Gaillard Saint-Jean-de-Rebervilliers Saint-Jean-Pierre-Fixte Saint-Laurent-la-Gâtine Saint-Léger-des-Aubées Saint-Lubin-de-Cravant Saint-Lubin-de-la-Haye Saint-Lubin-des-Joncherets Saint-Lucien Saint-Luperce Saint-Maixme-Hauterive Saint-Martin-de-Nigelles Saint-Maurice-Saint-Germain Saint-Maur-sur-le-Loir Saint-Ouen-Marchefroy Saint-Piat Saint-Prest Saint-Rémy-sur-Avre Saint-Sauveur-Marville Saint-Victor-de-Buthon Sainville Sancheville Sandarville Santeuil Santilly La Saucelle Saulnières Saumeray Saussay Senantes Senonches Serazereux Serville Soizé Sorel-Moussel Souancé-au-Perche Soulaires Sours Terminiers Theuville Le Thieulin Thimert-Gâtelles Thiron-Gardais Thivars Thiville Tillay-le-Péneux Toury Trancrainville Tremblay-les-Villages Tréon Trizay-Coutretot-Saint-Serge Trizay-lès-Bonneval Umpeau Unverre Varize Vaupillon Ver-lès-Chartres Vernouillet Vert-en-Drouais Vichères Vierville Vieuvicq Les Villages-Vovéens Villampuy Villars Villeau Villebon Villemaury Villemeux-sur-Eure Villiers-le-Morhier Villiers-Saint-Orien Vitray-en-Beauce Voise Yermenonville Yèvres Ymeray Ymonville

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WorldCat Identities VIAF: 152376663 LCCN: n50052169 GND: 4009794-8 SUDOC: 026515008 BNF:

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