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  • Richard P. Feynman, Robert B. Leighton, Matthew Sands. The Feynman Lectures on Physics, Volume I, Section 8–2. Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts (1963). ISBN 0-201-02116-1.
  1. ^ Wilson, Edwin Bidwell (1901). Vector analysis: a text-book for the use of students of mathematics and physics, founded upon the lectures of J. Willard Gibbs. p. 125. hdl:2027/mdp.39015000962285. This is the likely origin of the speed/velocity terminology in vector physics.
  2. ^ a b c Elert, Glenn. "Speed & Velocity". The Physics Hypertextbook. Retrieved 8 June 2017.
  3. ^ a b c Hewitt (2006), p. 42
  4. ^ "IEC 60050 - Details for IEV number 113-01-33: "speed"". Electropedia: The World's Online Electrotechnical Vocabulary. Retrieved 2017-06-08.
  5. ^ Wilson, Edwin Bidwell (1901). Vector analysis: a text-book for the use of students of mathematics and physics, founded upon the lectures of J. Willard Gibbs. p. 125. hdl:2027/mdp.39015000962285. This is the likely origin of the speed/velocity terminology in vector physics.
  6. ^ a b Hewitt (2006), p. 131
  7. ^ Hewitt (2006), p. 132
  8. ^ http://www.kickspeed.com.au/Improve-measure-kicking-speed.html
  9. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-08-11. Retrieved 2013-10-12.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  10. ^ Darling, David. "Fastest Spacecraft". Retrieved August 19, 2013.Jean Piaget, the intuition for the notion of speed in humans precedes that of duration, and is based on the notion of outdistancing.[11] Piaget studied this subject inspired by a question asked to him in 1928 by Albert Einstein: "In what order do children acquire the concepts of time and speed?"[12] Children's early concept of speed is based on "overtaking", taking only temporal and spatial orders into consideration, specifically: "A moving object is judged to be more rapid than another when at a given moment the first object is behind and a moment or so later ahead of the other object."[13]

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