HOME
        TheInfoList






An airport lounge is a facility operated at many airports. Airport lounges offer, for selected passengers, comforts beyond those afforded in the airport terminal itself, such as more comfortable seating,[1][2] quieter environments, and often better access to customer service representatives. Other accommodations may include private meeting rooms, telephones,[1] wireless internet access[1][2] and other business services, along with provisions to enhance passenger comfort, such as free drinks, snacks, magazines, and showers.[1][2]

The American Airlines Admirals Club was the first airport lounge when it opened at New York City's La Guardia Airport, in 1939. Then AA president C. R. Smith conceived it as a promotional tool.[3]

Entrance to the Dan Lounge in Ben Gurion Airport, Israel. The Dan Lounge is accessible to passengers of various airlines, holders of various membership schemes, and paying passengers.

Access to airport lounges may be obtained in several ways.[7] In Australia, Canada, and the United States, a common method to gain access is by purchasing an annual or a lifetime membership, while in Asia and Europe this is usually impossible.[7] In Australia, Canada, and the United States, a common method to gain access is by purchasing an annual or a lifetime membership, while in Asia and Europe this is usually impossible.[citation needed] Membership fees are sometimes discounted for elite members of an airline's frequent flyer program and may often be paid using miles. Certain high-end credit cards associated with an airline or lounge network, such as the Chase Sapphire Reserve, Delta Reserve, and United MileagePlus Club credit cards, include membership to Priority Pass and associated lounge access for as long as one owns the card.[8]

Lounge access can also be attained with an airline status card, which is common in Europe. The top frequent-flyer levels often offer access to any of an airline's lounges or partner airlines' lounges, when traveling in any class of travel on any of the partner airlines (usually it is required for the cardholder to be booked on one of the carrier's flights within the next 24 hours). Most airlines also usually offer free lounge access to anyone in their premium cabins (first class or business class) on their days of travel; in North America this is usually only available to passengers on intercontinental or transcontinental flights.[citation needed]

Pay-per-use lounges can be accessed by anyone, irrespective of airline or flight class. Some offer further benefits[clarification needed] when booking directly with them rather than through a reseller.[citation needed]

Independent programs, such as Collinson's first class or business class) on their days of travel; in North America this is usually only available to passengers on intercontinental or transcontinental flights.[citation needed]

Pay-per-use lounges can be accessed by anyone, irrespective of airline or flight class. Some offer further benefits[clarification needed] when booking directly with them rather than through a reseller.[citation needed]

Independent programs, such as Collinson's Priority Pass, offer access to selected airline lounges for an annual fee, while Go Simply, Holiday Extras, LoungePass, and some offerings by independent and airline lounge programs offer pay per use and/or prebookable access without need for membership. Premium credit and charge cards[9][10] such as Diners Club International, and the American Express Platinum and Centurion Card charge cards offer lounge programs for members. Some banks, like ABN Amro and HSBC, offer lounge access for premium clients.[11] American Express also offers access to lounges belonging to Priority Pass and is expanding its own line of lounges.[12]

Besides offering more comfortable seating, lounges usually provide complimentary alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages, and light snacks[1] such as fruit, cheese, soup, pastries and breakfast items.[citation needed] In the United States and Canada, nearly all domestic lounges offer an open bar for domestic beer, house wine and well liquor. In the United States, premium beverages such as imported beer, top-shelf liquor, high end wines and champagne are often available for purchase.[13][14] In U.S. states where open bars are prohibited by law, non-premium beverages may be sold at a token rate (e.g. $1 per drink).[citation needed]

Other amenities typically include flight information monitors, televisions, newspapers, and magazines,[1] plus business centers with desks, internet workstations, telephones,[1] photocopiers and fax services.[citation needed] Complimentary wireless Internet access for patrons is also common.[2][15]

In Asia, Europe and the Middle East, lounges (especially those for first class passengers) can be quite luxurious, offering an extensive premium open bar, full hot and cold buffet meals,[2] cigar rooms, spa and massage services, fitness centers, private cabanas,[16] nap suites[2] and showers.[2]televisions, newspapers, and magazines,[1] plus business centers with desks, internet workstations, telephones,[1] photocopiers and fax services.[citation needed] Complimentary wireless Internet access for patrons is also common.[2][15]

In Asia, Europe and the Middle East, lounges (especially those for first class passengers) can be quite luxurious, offering an extensive premium open bar, full hot and cold buffet meals,[2] cigar rooms, spa and massage services, fitness centers, private cabanas,[16] nap suites[2] and showers.[2][17]

Some lounges have pool tables as amenities.[13][18] Additionally, there are wireless charging stations in lounges, at some airports in London, installed by Nokia.[19]