George Claridge Druce
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George Claridge Druce
George Claridge Druce, MA, LLD, JP, FRS, FLS (23 May 1850 – 29 February 1932) was an English botanist and a Mayor of Oxford. Personal life and education G. Claridge Druce was born at Potterspury on Watling Street in Northamptonshire. He was the illegitimate son of Jane Druce, born 1815 in Buckinghamshire. He went to school in the village of Yardley Gobion. At 16, he was apprenticed to P. Jeyes & Co., a pharmaceutical firm in Northampton. In 1872, he passed exams to become a pharmacist. In 1909, Druce moved to 9 Crick Road. He named the house "Yardley Lodge", after the village in which he spent his youth. He died at his home aged 81 and was buried in Holywell Cemetery. Career as a pharmacist In June 1879, Druce moved to Oxford and set up his own chemist's shop, Druce & Co., at 118 High Street, which continued until his death. He also featured as a shopkeeper in the Oxford novel ''Zuleika Dobson'' by Max Beerbohm. A plaque to Druce was erected on this shop by the ...
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Potterspury
Potterspury is a populous village and civil parish in West Northamptonshire. The nearest main town is Milton Keynes, the centre of which is about 7 miles south-east. At the time of the 2011 census, the parish's population (including Furtho) was 1,453 people. The village's name is a concatenation. It was originally cognate with Perry and sometimes written as such, implying pear tree or orchard. Several places are named such regionally. The helpful (disambiguatory) prefix 'Potters', seen by the 15th century, is a nod to the very old, important potteries here. An alternative is "Estpury", seen in 1452. Geography Potterspury is on the A5 road, formerly the Roman road of Watling Street between Towcester six miles to the north and Stony Stratford a mile to the south. The village sits at the edge of Whittlewood Forest, a relatively large ancient woodland to the west that was part of the original estate of the Duke of Grafton. Much of this is an SSSI, recognising its biodiversity and p ...
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Crick Road
Crick Road is a road in North Oxford, England, an area characterised by large Victorian Gothic villas. Location At the western end is the Bradmore Road and at the eastern end is Fyfield Road. To the north is Norham Road and to the south are Norham Gardens and the University Parks. History and residents Houses in the road were first leased between 1876 and 1880. Architects include Willson Beasley, Frederick Codd, Galpin & Shirley, and Frederick R. Pike. The houses are mostly in pairs, with Jacobean as well as more traditional North Oxford Gothic detailing. In 1879, the school that was to become known as the Dragon School (previous known as the Oxford Preparatory School) moved from rooms at Balliol Hall in St Giles' to 17 Crick Road, which became known as "School House". The headmaster was initially A. E. Clarke and from 1886 Charles Cotterill Lynam (known as the "Skipper"). The school expanded and moved in 1895 to its current location at Bardwell Road, further no ...
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Queen Victoria
Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837 until her death in 1901. Her reign of 63 years and 216 days was longer than that of any previous British monarch and is known as the Victorian era. It was a period of industrial, political, scientific, and military change within the United Kingdom, and was marked by a great expansion of the British Empire. In 1876, the British Parliament voted to grant her the additional title of Empress of India. Victoria was the daughter of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent and Strathearn (the fourth son of King George III), and Princess Victoria of Saxe-Coburg-Saalfeld. After the deaths of her father and grandfather in 1820, she was raised under close supervision by her mother and her comptroller, John Conroy. She inherited the throne aged 18 after her father's three elder brothers died without surviving legitimate issue. Victoria, a constituti ...
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Diamond Jubilee
A diamond jubilee celebrates the 60th anniversary of a significant event related to a person (e.g. accession to the throne or wedding, among others) or the 60th anniversary of an institution's founding. The term is also used for 75th anniversaries, although the human lifespan makes this usage more common for institutions. Western monarchies George III of the United Kingdom died a few months before his diamond jubilee was due in 1820. The Diamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria celebrated her 60-year reign on 22 June 1897. The Diamond Jubilee of Elizabeth II, the Queen, was celebrated across the Commonwealth of Nations throughout 2012. Her next level of jubilee was her platinum jubilee in February 2022. Asian monarchies In East Asia, the diamond jubilee coincides with the traditional 60-year sexagenary cycle, which is held in special importance despite not generally being called a "diamond jubilee." Monarchs such as the Kangxi and Qianlong emperors of China and Empero ...
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Oxford Town Hall
Oxford Town Hall is a public building in St Aldate's Street in central Oxford, England. It is both the seat of Oxford City Council and a venue for public meetings, entertainment and other events. It also includes the Museum of Oxford. Although Oxford is a city with its own charter, the building is referred to as the "Town Hall". It is Oxford's third seat of government to have stood on the same site. The present building, completed in 1897, is Grade II* listed. History Oxford's guildhall was created by substantially repairing or rebuilding a house on the current site in about 1292. It was replaced by a new building, designed by Isaac Ware in the Italianate style in 1752. In 1891, an architectural design competition was held for a new building on the same site. The local architect Henry Hare won with a Jacobethan design. The 1752 building was demolished in 1893. Hare's new building included new premises for Oxford's Crown and County Courts, central public library and police stat ...
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Oxford City Council
Oxford City Council is the lower-tier local government authority for the city of Oxford in England, providing such services as leisure centres and parking. Social Services, Education and Highways services (amongst others) are provided by Oxfordshire County Council. Overview Between the 2004 local elections, and 2010 the council was in minority administration, first by councillors from the Labour Party, with the Liberal Democrats being the official opposition. In 2006 these roles were reversed, although two years later the council returned to being run by a minority Labour administration.Election 2008: Oxford council
BBC, 2008
before they took full control in 2010. Despite the stereotypical view of Oxford as a ...
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Plot Elm - Nr
Plot or Plotting may refer to: Art, media and entertainment * Plot (narrative), the story of a piece of fiction Music * ''The Plot'' (album), a 1976 album by jazz trumpeter Enrico Rava * The Plot (band), a band formed in 2003 Other * ''Plot'' (film), a 1973 French-Italian film * ''Plotting'' (video game), a 1989 Taito puzzle video game, also called Flipull * ''The Plot'' (video game), a platform game released in 1988 for the Amstrad CPC and Sinclair Spectrum * ''Plotting'' (non-fiction), a 1939 book on writing by Jack Woodford * ''The Plot'' (novel), a 2021 mystery by Jean Hanff Korelitz Graphics * Plot (graphics), a graphical technique for representing a data set * Plot (radar), a graphic display that shows all collated data from a ship's on-board sensors * Plot plan, a type of drawing which shows existing and proposed conditions for a given area Land * Plot (land), a piece of land used for building on ** Burial plot, a piece of land a person is buried in * Quadrat, ...
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Counties Of The United Kingdom
The counties of the United Kingdom are subnational divisions of the United Kingdom, used for the purposes of administrative, geographical and political demarcation. The older term, ''shire'' is historically equivalent to county. By the Middle Ages, county had become established as the unit of local government, at least in England. By the early 17th century, all of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland had been separated into counties. In Scotland ''shire'' was the only term used until after the Act of Union 1707. Since the early 19th century, counties have been adapted to meet new administrative and political requirements, and the word ''county'' (often with a qualifier) has been used in different senses for different purposes. In some areas of England and Wales, counties still perform the functions of modern local government. In other parts of the United Kingdom, especially within large metropolitan areas, they have been replaced with alternative unitary authorities, which are c ...
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Flora (publication)
A Flora is a book or other work which describes the plant species occurring in an area or time period, often with the aim of allowing identification. The term is usually capitalized to distinguish it from the use of "flora" to mean the plants rather than their descriptions. Some classic and modern Floras are listed below. Traditionally Floras are books, but some are now published on CD-ROM or websites. The area that a Flora covers can be either geographically or politically defined. Floras usually require some specialist botanical knowledge to use with any effectiveness. A Flora often contains diagnostic keys. Often these are ''dichotomous'' keys, which require the user to repeatedly examine a plant, and decide which one of two alternatives given in the Flora best applies to the plant. Floras produced at a local or regional level rarely contain identification keys. Instead they aim to impart more detailed understanding of the local status and distribution of that area's plants. ...
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Geranium X Oxonianum 'Claridge Druce'
''Geranium'' is a genus of 422 species of annual, biennial, and perennial plants that are commonly known as geraniums or cranesbills. They are found throughout the temperate regions of the world and the mountains of the tropics, but mostly in the eastern part of the Mediterranean region. The palmately cleft leaves are broadly circular in form. The flowers have five petals and are coloured white, pink, purple or blue, often with distinctive veining. Geraniums will grow in any soil as long as it is not waterlogged. Propagation is by semiripe cuttings in summer, by seed, or by division in autumn or spring. Geraniums are eaten by the larvae of some Lepidoptera species including brown-tail, ghost moth, and mouse moth. At least several species of ''Geranium'' are gynodioecious. The species ''Geranium viscosissimum'' (sticky geranium) is considered to be protocarnivorous. Name The genus name is derived from the Greek (''géranos'') or (''geranós'') ' crane'. The English name ...
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Botany
Botany, also called , plant biology or phytology, is the science of plant life and a branch of biology. A botanist, plant scientist or phytologist is a scientist who specialises in this field. The term "botany" comes from the Ancient Greek word (''botanē'') meaning " pasture", " herbs" "grass", or " fodder"; is in turn derived from (), "to feed" or "to graze". Traditionally, botany has also included the study of fungi and algae by mycologists and phycologists respectively, with the study of these three groups of organisms remaining within the sphere of interest of the International Botanical Congress. Nowadays, botanists (in the strict sense) study approximately 410,000 species of land plants of which some 391,000 species are vascular plants (including approximately 369,000 species of flowering plants), and approximately 20,000 are bryophytes. Botany originated in prehistory as herbalism with the efforts of early humans to identify – and later cultivate – ed ...
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Oxfordshire Blue Plaques Board
The Oxfordshire Blue Plaques Board established in 1999 was the brainchild of Sir Hugo Brunner, then Lord Lieutenant of Oxfordshire, and Edwin Townsend-Coles, Chairman of the Oxford Civic Society. The Board is an autonomous voluntary body whose members are drawn from cultural organisations and local government across the county. It awards and installs blue plaques on buildings in Oxford and Oxfordshire to commemorate very remarkable residents and, occasionally, historic events. For more detailed information, see the Board’s website. __TOC__ Blue plaques in the City of Oxford Blue plaques elsewhere in Oxfordshire See also * English Heritage English Heritage (officially the English Heritage Trust) is a charity that manages over 400 historic monuments, buildings and places. These include prehistoric sites, medieval castles, Roman forts and country houses. The charity states that i ... References External links Oxfordshire Blue Plaques Board plaquesrecorded on openp ...
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