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War Of 1812
Treaty of GhentMilitary stalemate; both sides' invasion attempts repulsed Status quo ante bellum Defeat of Tecumseh's ConfederacyBelligerents United StatesChoctaw Cherokee Creeks British Empire United Kingdom  The Canadas Tecumseh's Confederacy[1] Shawnee Creek Red Sticks Ojibwe Fox Iroquois Miami Mingo Ottawa Kickapoo Delaware (Lenape) Mascouten Potawatomi Sauk Wyandot Bourbon Spain Florida (1814)Commanders and leaders James Madison Henry Dearborn Jacob Brown Winfield Scott Andrew Jackson William Henry Harrison William H. Winder (POW) William Hull  (POW) Zebulon Pike † Oliver Hazard Perry Isaac Chauncey George, Prince Regent Lord Liverpool Sir George Prévost Sir Isaac Brock † Gordon Drummond Charles de Salaberry Roger Hale Sheaffe Robert Ross † Edward Pakenham † James FitzGibbon Alexander Cochrane James Lucas Yeo Tecumseh †StrengthU.S
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Killed In Action
Killed in action (KIA) is a casualty classification generally used by militaries to describe the deaths of their own combatants at the hands of hostile forces.[1] The United States
United States
Department of Defense, for example, says that those declared KIA need not have fired their weapons but have been killed due to hostile attack. KIAs do not come from incidents such as accidental vehicle crashes and other "non-hostile" events or terrorism. KIA can be applied both to front-line combat troops and to naval, air and support troops. Someone who is killed in action during a particular event is denoted with a † (dagger) beside their name to signify their death in that event or events. Further, KIA denotes one to have been killed in action on the battlefield whereas died of wounds (DOW) relates to someone who survived to reach a medical treatment facility
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The Canadas
The Canadas
The Canadas
is the collective name for Upper Canada
Upper Canada
and Lower Canada, two British historical colonies in present-day Canada.[1] They were both created by the Constitutional Act of 1791
Constitutional Act of 1791
and abolished in 1841 with the union of Upper and Lower Canada. Their names reflected their positions relative to the headwaters of the St
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Surrender (military)
Surrender, in military terms, is the relinquishment of control over territory, combatants, fortifications, ships or armament to another power. A surrender may be accomplished peacefully, without fighting, or it may be the result of defeat in battle. A sovereign state may surrender following defeat in a war, usually by signing a peace treaty or capitulation agreement
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William H. Winder
William
William
is a popular given name of an old Germanic origin.[1] It became very popular in the English language
English language
after the Norman conquest of England in 1066,[2] and remained so throughout the Middle Ages and into the modern era. It is sometimes abbreviated "Wm." Shortened familiar versions in English include Will, Willy, Bill, and Billy. A common Irish form is Liam. Female forms are Willa, Willemina, Willamette, Wilma and Wilhelmina. Etymology[edit]This article is missing information about the etymology of "Bill". Please expand the article to include this information. Further details may exist on the talk page. (October 2015) William
William
comes ultimately from the given name Wilhelm (cf. Old German Wilhelm > German Wilhelm and Old Norse
Old Norse
Vilhjálmr)
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History Of Spain (1810–73)
Spain
Spain
in the 19th century
19th century
was a country in turmoil. Occupied by Napoleon from 1808 to 1814, a massively destructive "war of independence" ensued, driven by an emergent Spanish nationalism. An era of reaction against the liberal ideas associated with revolutionary France followed the war, personified by the rule of Ferdinand VII and – to a lesser extent – his daughter Isabella II. Ferdinand's rule included the loss of the Spanish colonies in the New World, except for Cuba
Cuba
and Puerto Rico, in the 1810s and 1820s. A series of civil wars then broke out in Spain, pitting Spanish liberals and then republicans against conservatives, culminating in the Carlist Wars between the moderate Queen Isabella and her uncle, the reactionary Infante Carlos
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Wyandot People
The Wyandot people
Wyandot people
or Wendat, also called the Huron Nation and Huron people,[1][a] in most historic references are believed to have been the most populous confederacy of Iroquoian
Iroquoian
cultured indigenous peoples of North America. They traditionally spoke the Wyandot language, a Northern Iroquoian
Iroquoian
language and were believed to number over 30,000[1] at the time the first European trader-explorers made contact with them in the second decade of the 17th century. By the 15th century, the pre-contact Wyandots settled in the large area from the north shores of most of present-day Lake Ontario, northwards up to Georgian Bay
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Sauk People
The Sac or Sauk are a group of Native Americans of the Eastern Woodlands culture group, who lived primarily in the region of what is now Green Bay, Wisconsin, when first encountered by the French in 1667. Their autonym is oθaakiiwaki, and their exonym is Ozaagii(-wag) in Ojibwe
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Mascouten
The Mascouten (also Mascoutin, Mathkoutench, Muscoden, or Musketoon) were a tribe of Algonquian-speaking Native Americans located in the Midwest. They are believed to have dwelt on both sides of the Mississippi River, adjacent to the present-day Wisconsin-Illinois border, after being driven out of Michigan
Michigan
by the Odawa. They are first mentioned in historic records by French missionaries, who described the people as inhabiting the southern area of present-day Michigan
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Delaware (Lenape)
The Lenape
Lenape
(English: /ləˈnɑːpi/ or /ˈlɛnəpi/),[8] also called the Leni Lenape,[9] Lenni Lenape
Lenape
and
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Mingo
The Mingo
Mingo
people are an Iroquoian-speaking group of Native Americans made up of peoples who migrated west to the Ohio Country
Ohio Country
in the mid-18th century, primarily Seneca and Cayuga. Anglo-Americans called these migrants mingos, a corruption of mingwe, an Eastern Algonquian name for Iroquoian-language groups in general. Mingos have also been called "Ohio Iroquois" and "Ohio Seneca". Most were forced to move to Indian Territory
Indian Territory
in the early 1830s under the Indian Removal
Indian Removal
program. At the turn of the 20th century, they lost control of communal lands when property was allocated to individual households in a government assimilation effort related to the Dawes Act and extinguishing Indian claims to prepare for admission of Oklahoma as a state
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Fox (Native American)
The Meskwaki
Meskwaki
(sometimes spelled Mesquakie) are a Native American people often known to European-Americans as the Fox tribe. They have been closely linked to the Sauk people
Sauk people
of the same language family. In the Meskwaki
Meskwaki
language, the Meskwaki
Meskwaki
call themselves Meshkwahkihaki, which means "the Red-Earths," related to their creation story. Historically their homelands were in the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
region. The tribe coalesced in the St. Lawrence River
St. Lawrence River
Valley in present-day Ontario, Canada
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Ottawa (tribe)
The Odawa
Odawa
(also Ottawa
Ottawa
or Odaawaa /oʊˈdɒwə/), said to mean "traders", are an Indigenous American ethnic group who primarily inhabit land in the northern United States
United States
and southern Canada. They have long had territory that crosses the current border between the two countries, and they are federally recognized as Native American tribes in the United States
United States
and have numerous recognized First Nations bands in Canada. They are one of the Anishinaabeg, related to but distinct from the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
and Potawatomi
Potawatomi
peoples. After migrating from the East Coast in ancient times, they settled on Manitoulin Island, near the northern shores of Lake Huron, and the Bruce Peninsula
Bruce Peninsula
in the present-day province of Ontario, Canada. They considered this their original homeland
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Miami People
The Miami (Miami-Illinois: Myaamiaki) are a Native American nation originally speaking one of the Algonquian languages. Among the peoples known as the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
tribes, it occupied territory that is now identified as Indiana, southwest Michigan, and western Ohio. By 1846, most of the Miami had been removed to Indian Territory
Indian Territory
(now Oklahoma). The Miami Tribe of Oklahoma
Miami Tribe of Oklahoma
is the only federally recognized tribe of Miami Indians in the United States
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British Empire
The British Empire
Empire
comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom and its predecessor states. It originated with the overseas possessions and trading posts established by England
England
between the late 16th and early 18th centuries. At its height, it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power.[1] By 1913, the British Empire
Empire
held sway over 412 million people, 7001230000000000000♠23% of the world population at the time,[2] and by 1920, it covered 35,500,000 km2 (13,700,000 sq mi),[3] 7001240000000000000♠24% of the Earth's total land area.[4] As a result, its political, legal, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread
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Ojibwe
The Ojibwe, Ojibwa, or Chippewa are an Anishinaabeg
Anishinaabeg
group of Indigenous Peoples in North America
North America
known internally as Turtle Island. They live in Canada
Canada
and the United States
United States
and are one of the largest Indigenous ethnic groups north of the Rio Grande. In Canada, they are the second-largest First Nations
First Nations
population, surpassed only by the Cree. In the United States, they have the fifth-largest population among Native American tribes, surpassed only by the Navajo, Cherokee, Choctaw
Choctaw
and Lakota-Dakota-Nakota people. The Ojibwe
Ojibwe
people traditionally have spoken the Ojibwe
Ojibwe
language, a branch of the Algonquian language family
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