HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Wade–Giles
Wade–Giles (/ˌweɪd ˈdʒaɪlz/), sometimes abbreviated Wade,[citation needed] is a romanization system for Mandarin Chinese. It developed from a system produced by Thomas Wade, during the mid-19th century, and was given completed form with Herbert A. Giles's Chinese–English Dictionary of 1892. Wade–Giles was the system of transcription in the English-speaking world for most of the 20th century. Wade-Giles is based on Beijing dialect, whereas Nanking dialect-based romanization systems were in common use until the late 19th century. Both were used in postal romanizations (romanized place-names standardized for postal uses). In mainland China it has been mostly replaced by the Hanyu Pinyin romanization system, with exceptions for the romanized forms of some locations, persons and other proper nouns
[...More...]

Taiwanese Language Phonetic Alphabet
Taiwanese may refer to:Something from or related to Taiwan
Taiwan
(Formosa) Taiwanese aborigines, the indigenous people of Taiwan Han Taiwanese, the Han people of Taiwan
[...More...]

Wenzhounese Romanisation
Romanisation
Romanisation
of the Wenzhou dialect of Wu Chinese, part of the greater Ōu (simplified Chinese: 瓯; traditional Chinese: 甌) grouping of Wu dialects centred on the city, refers to the use of the Latin alphabet to represent the sounds of the dialect group.Contents1 Early romanisation 2 Contemporary2.1 Rhymes 2.2 Initials3 Native perspectives 4 See also 5 ReferencesEarly romanisation[edit] The first instance of Wenzhounese romanisation begins with the language documentation efforts of Christian missionaries who translated the Bible into many varieties of Chinese in both Chinese characters and in phonetic romanisation systems based largely on the Wade-Giles system
[...More...]

Guangdong Romanization
Guangdong
Guangdong
Romanization refers to the four romanization schemes published by the Guangdong
Guangdong
Provincial Education Department in 1960 for transliterating Cantonese, Teochew, Hakka, and Hainanese. The schemes utilized similar elements with some differences in order to adapt to their respective spoken varieties. In certain respects, Guangdong
Guangdong
romanization resembles pinyin in its distinction of the alveolar initials z, c, s from the alveolo-palatal initials j, q, x, and in its use of b, d, g to represent the unaspirated stop consonants /p t k/. In addition, it makes use of the medial u before the rime rather than representing it as w in the initial when it follows g or k. Guangdong
Guangdong
romanization makes use of diacritics to represent certain vowels. This includes the use of the circumflex, acute accent, and diaeresis in the letters ê, é, and ü, respectively
[...More...]

picture info

Wu Chinese
Wu (Shanghainese: [ɦu˨˨ ɲy˦˦]; Suzhou
Suzhou
dialect: [ɦəu˨˨ ɲy˦˦]; Wuxi
Wuxi
dialect: [ŋ˨˨˧ nʲy˨˨]) is a group of linguistically similar and historically related varieties of Chinese primarily spoken in the whole city of Shanghai, Zhejiang
Zhejiang
province and the southern half of Jiangsu
Jiangsu
province, as well as bordering areas. Major Wu varieties include those of Shanghai, Suzhou, Ningbo, Wuxi, Wenzhou/Oujiang, Hangzhou, Shaoxing, Jinhua
Jinhua
and Yongkang. Wu speakers, such as Chiang Kai-shek, Lu Xun
Lu Xun
and Cai Yuanpei, occupied positions of great importance in modern Chinese culture and politics
[...More...]

Wenzhounese
Wenzhounese (simplified Chinese: 温州话; traditional Chinese: 溫州話; pinyin: wēnzhōuhuà), also known as Oujiang (simplified Chinese: 瓯江话; traditional Chinese: 甌江話; pinyin: ōujiānghuà), Tong Au (simplified Chinese: 东瓯片; traditional Chinese: 東甌片; pinyin: dōngōupiàn) or Auish (simplified Chinese: 瓯语; traditional Chinese: 甌語; pinyin: ōuyŭ), is the language spoken in Wenzhou, the southern prefecture of Zhejiang, China. Nicknamed the "Devil's Language" for its complexity and difficulty, it is the most divergent division of Wu Chinese, with little to no mutual intelligibility with other Wu dialects or any other variety of Chinese. It features noticeable elements in common with Min Chinese, which is spoken to the south in Fujian
[...More...]

Comparison Of Cantonese Romanization Systems
The chart below shows the difference between S. L. Wong (romanization), Guangdong Romanization, Cantonese
Cantonese
Pinyin, Jyutping, Yale, Sidney Lau, Meyer–Wempe and New-French Latinization of Cantonese, With IPA and S. L. Wong phonetic symbols and Bopomofo Extended.Contents1 Chart1.1 Initials 1.2 Finals 1.3 TonesChart[edit] Initials[edit]  IPA S. L. Wong Phonetic Symbols Bopomofo Extended S
[...More...]

picture info

Cantonese
Cantonese, or Standard Cantonese, is a variety of the Chinese language spoken within Guangzhou
Guangzhou
(historically known as Canton) and its vicinity in southeastern China. It is the traditional prestige variety of Yue, one of the major subdivisions of Chinese. In mainland China, it is the lingua franca of the province of Guangdong, being the majority language of the Pearl River Delta, and neighbouring areas such as Guangxi. It is the dominant and official language of Hong Kong
Hong Kong
and Macau
[...More...]

picture info

Yale Romanization Of Cantonese
The Yale romanization of Cantonese
Cantonese
was developed by Gerard P. Kok for his and Parker Po-fei Huang's textbook Speak Cantonese
Cantonese
initially circulated in looseleaf form in 1952[1] but later published in 1958.[2] Unlike the Yale romanization of Mandarin, it is still widely used in books and dictionaries, especially for foreign learners of Cantonese. It shares some similarities with Hanyu Pinyin
Pinyin
in that unvoiced, unaspirated consonants are represented by letters traditionally used in English and most other European languages to represent voiced sounds. For example, [p] is represented as b in Yale, whereas its aspirated counterpart, [pʰ] is represented as p
[...More...]

Macau Government Cantonese Romanization
The Macau
Macau
Government Cantonese
Cantonese
Romanization
Romanization
refers to the mostly consistent system for romanizing Cantonese
Cantonese
as employed by the Government of Macau
Government of Macau
and other non-governmental organizations based in Macau. The system has been employed by the Macau
Macau
Government since the Portuguese colonial period and continues to be used after the 1999 handover of the territory
[...More...]

Hong Kong Government Cantonese Romanisation
The Hong Kong Government uses an unpublished system of Romanisation of Cantonese
Cantonese
for public purposes which is based on the 1888 standard described by Roy T Cowles in 1914 as Standard Romanisation.[1]:iv The primary need for Romanisation of Cantonese
Cantonese
by the Hong Kong Government is in the assigning of names to new streets and places
[...More...]

Barnett–Chao
The Cantonese
Cantonese
Romanisation system known as Barnett–Chao (abbreviated here as B–C) is based on the principles of the Gwoyeu Romatzyh system (GR) developed by Chao Yuenren in the 1920s, which he modified in 1947.[1] The B-C system is a modification in 1950 by K M A Barnett[2] (an Administrative Officer of the Hong Kong Government)[3] which was adopted by the School of Oriental and African Studies, L
[...More...]

Meyer–Wempe
Meyer–Wempe romanization was the system used by two Roman Catholic missionaries in Hong Kong, Bernard F. Meyer
Bernard F. Meyer
and Theodore F
[...More...]

Sidney Lau Romanisation
Sidney Lau romanisation is a system of romanisation for Cantonese
Cantonese
that was developed in the 1970s by Sidney Lau for teaching Cantonese
Cantonese
to Hong Kong Government expatriates. It is based on the Hong Kong Government's Standard Romanisation which was the result of the work of James D. Ball and Ernst J
[...More...]

picture info

S. L. Wong (phonetic Symbols)
Wong Shik Ling (also known as S. L. Wong) published a scheme of phonetic symbols for Cantonese
Cantonese
based on the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) in the book A Chinese Syllabary Pronounced according to the Dialect of Canton. The scheme has been widely used in Chinese dictionaries published in Hong Kong. The scheme, known as S. L. Wong system (黃錫凌式), is a broad phonemic transcription system based on IPA and its analysis of Cantonese
Cantonese
phonemes is grounded in the theories of Y. R. Chao. Other than the phonemic transcription system, Wong also derived a romanisation scheme published in the same book. See S. L
[...More...]

S. L. Wong (romanisation)
Wong Shik-Ling (also known as S. L. Wong) published a romanisation scheme accompanying a set of phonetic symbols for Cantonese
Cantonese
based on International Phonetic Alphabet
International Phonetic Alphabet
(IPA) in the book A Chinese Syllabary Pronounced according to the Dialect of Canton.Contents1 Phonology1.1 Finals1.1.1 Vowels 1.1.2 Falling diphthong finals 1.1.3 Nasal phoneme finals 1.1.4 Plosive phoneme finals 1.1.5 Nasal consonantoids fully voiced finals1.2 Initials 1.3 Tones2 See also 3 References 4 External linksPhonology[edit] Cantonese, like a number of other varieties of Chinese is monosyllabic
[...More...]