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Visigoth
The Visigoths
Visigoths
(UK: /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɒθs/; US: /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɑːθs/; Latin: Visigothi, Wisigothi, Vesi, Visi, Wesi, Wisi; Italian: Visigoti) were the western branches of the nomadic tribes of Germanic peoples referred to collectively as the Goths.[2] These tribes flourished and spread throughout the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in Late Antiquity, or what is known as the Migration Period
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Late Middle Ages
The Late Middle Ages
Middle Ages
or Late Medieval
Medieval
Period was the period of European history
European history
lasting from 1250-1500 AD. The Late Middle Ages followed the High Middle Ages
High Middle Ages
and preceded the onset of the early modern era (and, in much of Europe, the Renaissance).[1] Around 1300, centuries of prosperity and growth in Europe
Europe
came to a halt. A series of famines and plagues, including the Great Famine
Famine
of 1315–1317 and the Black Death, reduced the population to around half of what it was before the calamities.[2] Along with depopulation came social unrest and endemic warfare
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Councils Of Toledo
Councils of Toledo
Councils of Toledo
(Concilia toletana). From the 5th century to the 7th century AD, about thirty synods, variously counted, were held at Toledo in what would come to be part of Spain. The earliest, directed against Priscillianism, assembled in 400. The "third" synod of 589 marked the epoch-making conversion of King Reccared
Reccared
from Arianism
Arianism
to orthodox Chalcedonian Christianity. The "fourth," in 633, probably under the presidency of the noted Isidore of Seville, regulated many matters of discipline and decreed uniformity of liturgy throughout the kingdom. The British Celts of Galicia accepted the Latin rite and stringent measures were adopted against baptized Jews who had gone back to their former faith. The "twelfth" council in 681 assured to the archbishop of Toledo the primacy of Hispania
Hispania
(present Iberian Peninsula)
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Walters Art Museum
Coordinates: 39°17′48″N 76°36′58″W / 39.29667°N 76.61611°W / 39.29667; -76.61611The Walters Art MuseumNorth Charles Street original main entranceFormer name The Walters Art GalleryEstablished 1934 (1934)Location Mount Vernon-Belvedere, Baltimore, Maryland, U.S.Type Art museumDirector Julia Marciari-Alexander (2016)[1] Public
Public
transit access  Light Rail Hunt Valley – BWI MarshallCentre Street StationWebsite Official websiteThe Walters Art Museum, located in Mount Vernon-Belvedere, Baltimore, Maryland, United States, is a public art museum founded and opened in 1934
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British English
British English
British English
is the standard dialect of English language
English language
as spoken and written in the United Kingdom.[3] Variations exist in formal, written English in the United Kingdom. For example, the adjective wee is almost exclusively used in parts of Scotland
Scotland
and Ireland, and occasionally Yorkshire, whereas little is predominant elsewhere. Nevertheless, there is a meaningful degree of uniformity in written English within the United Kingdom, and this could be described by the term British English. The forms of spoken English, however, vary considerably more than in most other areas of the world where English is spoken,[4] so a uniform concept of British English
British English
is more difficult to apply to the spoken language
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American English
American English
American English
(AmE, AE, AmEng, USEng, en-US),[3] sometimes called United States
United States
English or U.S. English,[4][5] is the set of dialects of the English language
English language
native to the United States
United States
of America.[6] English is the most widely spoken language in the United States
United States
and is the common language used by the federal government, to the extent that all laws and compulsory education are practiced in English
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Italian Language
Italian ( italiano (help·info) [itaˈljaːno] or lingua italiana [ˈliŋɡwa itaˈljaːna]) is a Romance language. Italian is by most measures, together with the Sardinian language, the closest tongue to vulgar Latin
Latin
of the Romance languages.[7] Italian is an official language in Italy, Switzerland, San Marino, Vatican City
Vatican City
and western Istria
Istria
(in Slovenia
Slovenia
and Croatia). It used to have official status in Albania, Malta
Malta
and Monaco, where it is still widely spoken, as well as in former Italian East Africa
Italian East Africa
and Italian North Africa regions where it plays a significant role in various sectors
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Pyrenees
The Pyrenees
Pyrenees
(/ˈpɪrɪniːz/; Spanish: Pirineos [piɾiˈneos], French: Pyrénées [piʁene], Aragonese: Pirineus, Catalan: Pirineus [piɾiˈnɛus], Occitan: Pirenèus, Basque: Pirinioak [piˈɾinioˌak]) is a range of mountains in southwest Europe
Europe
that forms a natural border between Spain
Spain
and France. Reaching a height of 3,404 metres (11,168 ft) altitude at the peak of Aneto, the range separates the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
from the rest of continental Europe, and extends for about 491 km (305 mi) from the Bay of Biscay (Cap Higuer) to the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
(Cap de Creus). For the most part, the main crest forms a divide between Spain
Spain
and France, with the microstate of Andorra
Andorra
sandwiched in between
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Battle Of Adrianople
15,000–20,000[1] or 25,000–30,000[2]12,000–15,000[3] or 80,000–100,000[4]Casualties and losses10,000–15,000[5] or 20,000[6] (roughly two-thirds of the Roman force)[7] Unknownv t eGothic War (376–382)Marcianople Willows Dibaltum Adrianople Adrianople (Siege) Constantinople Thessalonicav t eFall of the Western Roman EmpireAdrianople Pollentia Verona Florence Faesulae Moguntiacum The Rhine Rome (410) Nervasos Mountains Narbonne Catalaunian Plains (Chalons) Aquileia Rome (455) Arelate Cartagena Orleans Cap Bon RavennaThe Battle of Adrianople (9 August 378), sometimes known as the Battle of Hadrianopolis, was fought between an Eastern Roman army led by the Eastern Roman Emperor Valens and Gothic rebels (largely Thervings as well as Greutungs, non-Gothic Alans, and various local rebels) led by Fritigern
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Capital City
A capital city (or simply capital) is the municipality exercising primary status in a country, state, province, or other administrative region, usually as its seat of government. A capital is typically a city that physically encompasses the government's offices and meeting places; the status as capital is often designated by its law or constitution. In some jurisdictions, including several countries, the different branches of government are located in different settlements. In some cases, a distinction is made between the official (constitutional) capital and the seat of government, which is in another place. Capital cities that are also the prime economic, cultural, or intellectual centres of a nation or an empire are sometimes referred to as primate cities
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Nicene Christianity
Nicene Christianity
Christianity
refers to Christian doctrinal traditions that adhere to the Nicene Creed, which was originally formulated at the First Council of Nicaea
First Council of Nicaea
in 325 AD and finished at the First Council of Constantinople in AD 381.[1] It is much more commonly referred to as mainstream Christianity.[2] The main rival doctrine of Nicene Christianity
Christianity
at the time was Arian Christianity, which ceased to exist during the 7th century AD with the conversion of the Gothic kingdoms to Nicene Christianity. The main points of dissent centered on Christology. Nicene Christianity considers Christ to be divine and co-eternal with God the Father, while Arian Christianity
Christianity
considered Christ to be the first created being, and inferior to God the Father
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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Carolingian Dynasty
Non-agnatic lines:Robertian dynastyHouse of Capet Bosonid dynastyCarolingian dynastyThe Carolingian cross.PippinidsPippin the Elder (c. 580–640) Grimoald (616–656) Childebert the Adopted
Childebert the Adopted
(d. 662)Arnulfings Arnulf of Metz
Arnulf of Metz
(582–640) Ansegisel (d. 662 or 679) Chlodulf of Metz (d. 696 or 697) Pepin of Herstal
Pepin of Herstal
(635-714) Grimoald II (d. 714) Drogo of Champagne
Drogo of Champagne
(670–708) Theudoald (d. 741)Carolingians Charles Martel
Charles Martel
(686–741) Carloman (d
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Byzantine Empire
The Byzantine
Byzantine
Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire, was the continuation of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the East during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople
Constantinople
(modern-day Istanbul, which had been founded as Byzantium). It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453.[2] During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe
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Battle Of Covadonga
The Battle of Covadonga
Covadonga
was the first victory by Christian military forces in Iberia
Iberia
since the Islamic conquest of Hispania
Islamic conquest of Hispania
in 711–718. It was fought at Covadonga, most likely in the summer of 722. The battle followed the creation in 718 of an independent Christian principality in the mountains of the northwestern region of the Iberian peninsula
Iberian peninsula
that grew into the Kingdom of Asturias
Kingdom of Asturias
and became a bastion of Christian resistance to the expansion of Muslim rule
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