HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Vandal
The Vandals, a large East Germanic tribe or group of tribes, first appear in history inhabiting present-day southern Poland, but some later moved in large numbers, including most notably the group which successively established kingdoms in Spain and then North Africa
North Africa
in the 5th century.[1] Scholars believe that the Vandals
Vandals
migrated from southern Scandinavia to the area between the lower Oder
Oder
and Vistula
Vistula
rivers during the 2nd century BC and settled in Silesia
Silesia
from around 120 BC.[2][3][4] They are associated with the Przeworsk culture
Przeworsk culture
and were possibly the same people as the Lugii
[...More...]

"Vandal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rhine
The Rhine
Rhine
(Latin: Rhenus, Romansh: Rein, German: Rhein, French: le Rhin,[1] Dutch: Rijn) is a European river that begins in the Swiss canton of Graubünden
Graubünden
in the southeastern Swiss Alps, forms part of the Swiss-Liechtenstein, Swiss-Austrian, Swiss-German and then the Franco-German border, then flows through the German Rhineland
Rhineland
and the Netherlands
Netherlands
and eventually empties into the North Sea. The largest city on the Rhine
Rhine
is Cologne, Germany, with a population of more than 1,050,000 people
[...More...]

"Rhine" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Silesia
Silesia
Silesia
(/sɪˈliːʒə-/;[1] Polish: Śląsk [ɕlɔ̃sk]; Czech: Slezsko; German:  Schlesien (help·info) German pronunciation: [ˈʃleːzi̯ən]; Silesian German: Schläsing; Silesian: Ślůnsk [ɕlonsk]; Lower Sorbian: Šlazyńska; Upper Sorbian: Šleska; Latin: Silesia) is a region of Central Europe located mostly in Poland, with small parts in the Czech Republic
Czech Republic
and Germany. Its area is about 40,000 km2 (15,444 sq mi), and its population about 8,000,000. Silesia
Silesia
is located along the Oder River. It consists of Lower Silesia
Lower Silesia
and Upper Silesia. The region is rich in mineral and natural resources, and includes several important industrial areas. Silesia's largest city and historical capital is Wrocław
[...More...]

"Silesia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Constantine The Great
Constantine the Great
Constantine the Great
(Latin: Flavius Valerius Aurelius Constantinus Augustus;[2] Greek: Κωνσταντῖνος ὁ Μέγας; 27 February c. 272 AD[1] – 22 May 337 AD), also known as Constantine I or Saint Constantine, in the Orthodox Church
Orthodox Church
as Saint Constantine the Great, Equal-to-the-Apostles,[3] was a Roman Emperor of Illyrian and Greek origin from 306 to 337 AD. He was the son of Flavius Valerius Constantius, a Roman Army
Roman Army
officer, and his consort Helena. His father became Caesar, the deputy emperor in the west, in 293 AD. Constantine was sent east, where he rose through the ranks to become a military tribune under Emperors Diocletian
Diocletian
and Galerius
[...More...]

"Constantine The Great" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pannonia
Pannonia
Pannonia
was an ancient province of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
bounded north and east by the Danube, coterminous westward with Noricum
Noricum
and upper Italy, and southward with Dalmatia and upper Moesia
[...More...]

"Pannonia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Barbarian
A barbarian is a human who is perceived to be either uncivilized or primitive. The designation is usually applied as generalization based on a popular stereotype; barbarians can be any member of a nation judged by some to be less civilized or orderly (such as a tribal society), but may also be part of a certain "primitive" cultural group (such as nomads) or social class (such as bandits) both within and outside one's own nation. Alternatively, they may instead be admired and romanticised as noble savages
[...More...]

"Barbarian" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gaul
Gaul
Gaul
(Latin: Gallia) was a region of Western Europe
Western Europe
during the Iron Age that was inhabited by Celtic tribes, encompassing present day France, Luxembourg, Belgium, most of Switzerland, Northern Italy, as well as the parts of the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Germany
Germany
on the west bank of the Rhine. It covered an area of 494,000 km2 (191,000 sq mi).[1] According to the testimony of Julius Caesar, Gaul
Gaul
was divided into three parts: Gallia Celtica, Belgica and Aquitania
[...More...]

"Gaul" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

The Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
[...More...]

"The Renaissance" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Early Modern Period
The early modern period of modern history follows the late Middle Ages of the post-classical era. Although the chronological limits of the period are open to debate, the timeframe spans the period after the late portion of the post-classical age (c. 1500), known as the Middle Ages, through the beginning of the Age of Revolutions (c
[...More...]

"Early Modern Period" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Oder
The Oder
Oder
(/ˈoʊdər/; Czech, Lower Sorbian and Polish: Odra, German: Oder, Upper Sorbian: Wódra)[1] is a river in Central Europe
[...More...]

"Oder" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Scandinavia
Scandinavia[a] (/ˌskændɪˈneɪviə/ SKAN-dih-NAY-vee-ə) is a region in Northern Europe, characterized by common ethnocultural North Germanic heritage and mutually intelligible North Germanic languages.[2] The term Scandinavia
Scandinavia
in local usage covers the three kingdoms of Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, but in English usage, it also sometimes refers to the Scandinavian Peninsula
Scandinavian Peninsula
or to the broader region which includes Finland
Finland
and Iceland.[1] This broader region is usually known locally as the Nordic countries.[3] The remote Norwegian islands of Svalbard
Svalbard
and Jan Mayen
Jan Mayen
are usually not seen as a part of Scandinavia, nor is Greenland, a constituent country within the Kingdom of Denmark
[...More...]

"Scandinavia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Poland
Coordinates: 52°N 20°E / 52°N 20°E / 52; 20 Republic
Republic
of Poland Rzeczpospolita
Rzeczpospolita
Polska  (
[...More...]

"Poland" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Pyrenees
The Pyrenees
Pyrenees
(/ˈpɪrɪniːz/; Spanish: Pirineos [piɾiˈneos], French: Pyrénées [piʁene], Aragonese: Pirineus, Catalan: Pirineus [piɾiˈnɛus], Occitan: Pirenèus, Basque: Pirinioak [piˈɾinioˌak]) is a range of mountains in southwest Europe
Europe
that forms a natural border between Spain
Spain
and France. Reaching a height of 3,404 metres (11,168 ft) altitude at the peak of Aneto, the range separates the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
from the rest of continental Europe, and extends for about 491 km (305 mi) from the Bay of Biscay (Cap Higuer) to the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
(Cap de Creus). For the most part, the main crest forms a divide between Spain
Spain
and France, with the microstate of Andorra
Andorra
sandwiched in between
[...More...]

"Pyrenees" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vistula
The Vistula
Vistula
(/ˈvɪstjʊlə/; Polish: Wisła
Wisła
[ˈvʲiswa], German: Weichsel [ˈvaɪksl̩], Low German: Wießel, Yiddish: ווייסל‎ Yiddish pronunciation: [vajsl̩]) is the longest and largest river in Poland, at 1,047 kilometres (651 miles) in length. The drainage basin area of the Vistula
Vistula
is 194,424 km2 (75,068 sq mi), of which 168,699 km2 (65,135 sq mi) lies within Poland
Poland
(splitting the country in half)
[...More...]

"Vistula" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Late Antiquity
Late antiquity
Late antiquity
is a periodization used by historians to describe the time of transition from classical antiquity to the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
in mainland Europe, the Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world, and the Near East. The development of the periodization has generally been accredited to historian Peter Brown, after the publication of his seminal work The World of Late Antiquity (1971). Precise boundaries for the period are a continuing matter of debate, but Brown proposes a period between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD. Generally, it can be thought of as from the end of the Roman Empire's Crisis of the Third Century
Crisis of the Third Century
(c. 235 – 284) to, in the East, the Muslim conquests
Muslim conquests
in the mid-7th century
[...More...]

"Late Antiquity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Roman Dacia
Roman Dacia
Dacia
(also Dacia
Dacia
Traiana " Trajan
Trajan
Dacia" or Dacia
Dacia
Felix "Happy Dacia") was a province of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
from 106 to 274–275 AD. Its territory consisted of eastern and south-eastern Transylvania, the Banat
Banat
and Oltenia
Oltenia
(regions of modern Romania). It was from the very beginning organized as an imperial province, fitting a border area, and remained so throughout the Roman occupation. Historians' estimates of the population of Roman Dacia
Dacia
range from 650,000 to 1,200,000.[1] The conquest of Dacia
Dacia
was completed by Emperor Trajan
Trajan
(98–117) after two major campaigns against Decebalus' Dacian kingdom
[...More...]

"Roman Dacia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.