HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1500] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Tupungato
TUPUNGATO, one of the highest mountains in the Americas , is a massive Andean stratovolcano dating to Pleistocene times. It lies on the border between the Chilean Metropolitan Region (near a major international highway about 80 km (50 mi) east of Santiago ) and the Argentine province of Mendoza , about 100 km (62 mi) south of Aconcagua
Aconcagua
, the highest peak of both the Southern and Western Hemispheres . Immediately to its southwest is the active Tupungatito volcano, which last erupted in 1987. The mountain gives its name to the Tupungato Department , an important Argentine wine producing region in the Mendoza province. CONTENTS * 1 1947 plane crash * 2 See also * 3 Notes * 4 References * 5 Sources * 6 External links 1947 PLANE CRASH Main article: BSAA Star Dust accident On August 2, 1947, the airliner Star Dust , an Avro Lancastrian carrying six passengers and five crew over the Andes
Andes
range, crashed into a steep glacier high on the Argentine side of Tupungato. The plane was quickly buried in the resulting avalanche and heavy snowfall that was taking place at the time. The plane lay undetected deep beneath the snow and glacial ice for over 50 years, before its remnants finally re-emerged at the glacier terminus in 2000
[...More...]

"Tupungato" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Summit
A SUMMIT is a point on a surface that is higher in elevation than all points immediately adjacent to it. Mathematically , a summit is a local maximum in elevation. The topographic terms "acme", "apex", "peak" , and "zenith " are synonymous . CONTENTS* 1 Definition * 1.1 Western United States * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links DEFINITIONThe term "summit" is generally used only for a mountain peak with some significant amount of topographic prominence (height above the lowest point en route to the nearest higher peak) or topographic isolation (distance from the nearest point of higher elevation); for example, a boulder next to the main summit of a mountain is not considered a summit. Summits near a higher peak, with some prominence or isolation, but not reaching a certain cutoff value for the quantities, are often considered _subsummits_ (or _subpeaks_) of the higher peak, and are considered as part of the same mountain. The UIAA definition is that a summit is independent if it has a prominence of 30 metres (98 ft ) or more; it is a mountain if it has a prominence of at least 300 metres (980 ft). This can be summarised as follows: TERM PROMINENCE ISOLATION Subpeak < 30 m ? m Independent peak or summit 30 m or more ? m Mountain 300 m or more ? mA pyramidal peak is an exaggerated form produced by ice erosion of a mountain top. Summit may also refer to the highest point along a line, trail, or route
[...More...]

"Summit" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Topographic Prominence
In topography , PROMINENCE characterizes the height of a mountain or hill's summit by the vertical distance between it and the lowest contour line encircling it but containing no higher summit within it. It is a measure of the independence of a summit . A peak's _key col_ is a unique point on this contour line and the PARENT PEAK is some higher mountain, selected according to various objective criteria. CONTENTS * 1 Definitions * 2 Illustration * 3 In mountaineering * 4 Parent peak * 4.1 Encirclement or island parentage * 4.2 Prominence parentage * 4.3 Line parentage * 4.4 Other criteria * 5 Issues in choice of summit and key col * 6 Interesting prominence situations * 7 Calculations and mathematics * 8 Wet prominence and dry prominence * 9 See also * 10 Notes * 11 References * 12 External links DEFINITIONS Figure 1. Vertical arrows show the topographic prominence of three peaks on an island. The dashed horizontal lines show the lowest contours that do not encircle higher peaks. Curved arrows point from a peak to its parent. By convention, the prominence of Mount Everest , the Earth's highest mountain, is taken to equal the elevation of its summit above sea level
[...More...]

"Topographic Prominence" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

List Of Mountain Lists
There are many notable MOUNTAIN LISTS around the world. Typically, a list of mountains becomes notable by first being listed or defined by an author or group (e.g. Sir Hugh Munro defining the Munros in Scotland ). This list then becomes a popular target for peak bagging , where a number of people attempt to climb all of the peaks in the list. Alternatively, a list of mountains may become notable in the mountaineering community as a challenge. An example of such a challenge list is the Seven Summits defined by Richard Bass . Examples of notable lists of mountains are shown below. CONTENTS * 1 Worldwide * 2 Europe * 3 British Isles * 4 North America * 4.1 Canada * 4.2 Mexico * 4.3 United States * 5 Central America * 5.1 Guatemala * 6 South America * 7 Asia * 7.1 China * 7.2 Japan * 7.3 Indonesia * 7.4 Taiwan * 8 Australia * 9 See also * 10 References WORLDWIDE * The Eight-thousanders are the fourteen mountains over 8,000 metres (26,247 ft) in height, all in the Himalaya and Karakoram ranges in Asia . * The Seven Summits are the highest peaks on each continent , from the Vinson Massif in Antarctica to Everest in Asia . * The Seven Second Summits are the second highest peaks on each continent
[...More...]

"List Of Mountain Lists" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Ultra Prominent Peak
An ULTRA-PROMINENT PEAK, or ULTRA for short, is defined as a mountain summit with a topographic prominence of 1,500 metres (4,921 ft) or more. There are approximately 1,524 such peaks on Earth. Some peaks, such as the Matterhorn
Matterhorn
and Eiger
Eiger
, are not Ultras because they are connected to higher mountains by high cols and therefore do not achieve enough topographic prominence. The term "Ultra" originated with earth scientist Stephen Fry, from his studies of the prominence of peaks in Washington in the 1980s. His original term was "ultra major mountain", referring to peaks with at least 5,000 ft (1,524 m) of prominence. CONTENTS * 1 Distribution * 2 Lists of Ultras (1515) * 2.1 General * 2.2 Europe
Europe
(119) * 2.3 Asia (637) * 2.4 Africa
Africa
(84) * 2.5 Oceania (69) * 2.6 Antarctica (41) * 2.7 North America (355) * 2.8 South America
South America
(209) * 3 See also * 4 References DISTRIBUTIONCurrently, 1,515 Ultras have been identified worldwide: 637 in Asia , 355 in North America , 209 in South America
South America
, 119 in Europe
Europe
(including the Caucasus
Caucasus
), 84 in Africa
Africa
, 69 in Australasia and 39 in Antarctica
[...More...]

"Ultra Prominent Peak" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Geographic Coordinate System
A GEOGRAPHIC COORDINATE SYSTEM is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position , and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position . A common choice of coordinates is latitude , longitude and elevation . To specify a location on a two-dimensional map requires a map projection
[...More...]

"Geographic Coordinate System" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mendoza Province
The PROVINCE OF MENDOZA (Spanish pronunciation: ) is a province of Argentina , located in the western central part of the country in the Cuyo region. It borders to the north with San Juan , the south with La Pampa and Neuquén , the east with San Luis , and to the west with the republic of Chile ; the international limit is marked by the Andes mountain range. Its capital city is the homonymous city of Mendoza . Covering an area of 148.827 km², it is the seventh biggest province of Argentina with 5.35% of the country's total area. The population for 2010 is 1,741,610 inhabitants, which makes it the fourth most populated province of the country, or 4.35% of the total national population. CONTENTS* 1 History * 1.1 Pre-Columbian times * 1.2 Spanish colony (1550-1810) * 1.3 Independence * 1.4 19th century * 1.5 20th century * 2 Geography and climate * 3 Economy * 4 Political division * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links HISTORYPRE-COLUMBIAN TIMESArcheological studies have determined that the first inhabitants in the area date from the Holocene , but there are few remains of those people to know their habits. The earliest sites of human occupation in Mendoza Province, Agua de la Cueva and Gruta del Indio, are 12-13,000 years old. In the basins of the Atuel River , in 300 BC lived a group of people that lived via hunting and the cultivation of maize , pumpkins and beans
[...More...]

"Mendoza Province" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Argentina
Coordinates : 34°S 64°W / 34°S 64°W / -34; -64 Argentine Republic _República Argentina_ (Spanish ) _ Flag Coat of arms MOTTO: * " En unión y libertad "_ * ("In Unity and Freedom") ANTHEM: * _Himno Nacional Argentino _ * ("Argentine National Anthem") * _ Sol de Mayo _ (Sun of May) Argentina shown in dark green Capital and largest city Buenos Aires 34°36′S 58°23′W / 34.600°S 58.383°W / -34.600; -58.383 Official language and national language Spanish REGIONAL LANGUAGESGuaraní in Corrientes ; Qom , Mocoví and Wichi<
[...More...]

"Argentina" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Santiago Metropolitan Region
SANTIAGO METROPOLITAN REGION or simply METROPOLITAN REGION (Spanish: Región Metropolitana de Santiago) is one of Chile 's 15 first-order administrative divisions . It is the country's only landlocked administrative region and contains the nation's capital, Santiago. Most commercial and administrative centers are located in the region, including Chile's main international airport, Arturo Merino Benítez . With an area of 15,403.2 km2 (5,947 sq mi) and population over 6 million, it is Chile's smallest by area, most populated and most densely populated region. It is also the country's only region that does not have a Roman numeral identifier. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Geography * 3 Climate and natural features * 4 Economy and culture * 5 Government and administration * 6 References * 7 Gallery * 8 External links HISTORYThe region's history of European influence started in 1542, a few days after Santiago was founded. When the Santiago cabildo was built, its function was to supervise the entire territory. Later, with the creation of the cities of La Serena and Concepción and the creation of their respective cabildos, its territorial reach was reduced. On 30 August 1826, 8 provinces were created, with the Santiago Province being one of them, but it wasn't until 1980 that the Metropolitan Region was created
[...More...]

"Santiago Metropolitan Region" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chile
Coordinates : 30°S 71°W / 30°S 71°W / -30; -71 Republic of Chile _República de Chile_ (Spanish ) Flag Coat of arms MOTTO: * "Por la razón o la fuerza" (Spanish ) * "By right or might" map ANTHEM: _ National Anthem of Chile _ Chile shown in dark green; claimed but unrecognised Antarctic Territory shown in light green
[...More...]

"Chile" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mountain Range
A MOUNTAIN RANGE also called MOUNTAINS or MOUNTAIN BARRIER/BELT/SYSTEM, is a geographic area containing numerous geologically related mountains . A mountain system or system of mountain ranges, sometimes is used to combine several geological features that are geographically (regionally) related. On Earth, most significant mountain ranges are the result of plate tectonics , though mountain ranges are formed by a range of processes, are found on many planetary mass objects in the Solar System and are likely a feature of most terrestrial planets . Mountain ranges are usually segmented by highlands or mountain passes and valleys . Individual mountains within the same mountain range do not necessarily have the same geologic structure or petrology . They may be a mix of different orogenic expressions and terranes , for example thrust sheets , uplifted blocks , fold mountains, and volcanic landforms resulting in a variety of rock types . CONTENTS * 1 Major ranges * 2 Divisions and categories * 3 Climate * 4 Erosion * 5 Extraterrestrial "Montes" * 6 See also * 7 References * 8 External links MAJOR RANGES An 1865 lithograph showing the High Tatras mountain range in Slovakia and Poland by Karel Kořistka appearing in a book by August Heinrich Petermann
[...More...]

"Mountain Range" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Andes
The ANDES or ANDEAN MOUNTAINS (Spanish : _Cordillera de los Andes_) are the longest continental mountain range in the world. They form a continuous highland along the western edge of South America . This range is about 7,000 km (4,300 mi) long, about 200 to 700 km (120 to 430 mi) wide (widest between 18° south and 20° south latitude ), and of an average height of about 4,000 m (13,000 ft). The Andes extend from north to south through seven South American countries: Venezuela , Colombia , Ecuador , Peru , Bolivia , Argentina and Chile . Along their length, the Andes are split into several ranges, which are separated by intermediate depressions . The Andes are the location of several high plateaus – some of which host major cities such as Quito , Bogotá , Arequipa , Medellín , Sucre , Mérida and La Paz . The Altiplano plateau is the world's second-highest after the Tibetan plateau . These ranges are in turn grouped into three major divisions based on climate: the Tropical Andes , the Dry Andes , and the Wet Andes
[...More...]

"Andes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Geologic Time Scale
The GEOLOGIC TIME SCALE (GTS) is a system of chronological dating that relates geological strata (stratigraphy ) to time, and is used by geologists , paleontologists , and other Earth scientists to describe the timing and relationships of events that have occurred during Earth\'s history . The table of geologic time spans, presented here, agrees with the nomenclature , dates and standard color codes set forth by the International Commission on Stratigraphy . Evidence from radiometric dating indicates that Earth is about 4.54 billion years old . The geology or _deep time _ of Earth's past has been organized into various units according to events which took place in each period. Different spans of time on the GTS are usually marked by changes in the composition of strata which correspond to those, and indicate major geological or paleontological events, such as mass extinctions . For example, the boundary between the Cretaceous period and the Paleogene period is defined by the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event , which marked the demise of the non-avian dinosaurs and many other groups of life. Older time spans, which predate the reliable fossil record (before the Proterozoic eon ), are defined by their absolute age
[...More...]

"Geologic Time Scale" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pleistocene
The PLEISTOCENE ( /ˈplaɪstəˌsiːn, -toʊ-/ , often colloquially referred to as the ICE AGE) is the geological epoch which lasted from about 2,588,000 to 11,700 years ago, spanning the world's most recent period of repeated glaciations . The end of the Pleistocene corresponds with the end of the last glacial period and also with the end of the Paleolithic
Paleolithic
age used in archaeology . The Pleistocene
Pleistocene
is the first epoch of the Quaternary
Quaternary
Period or sixth epoch of the Cenozoic
Cenozoic
Era . In the ICS timescale, the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
is divided into four stages or ages , the Gelasian , Calabrian , Ionian and Tarantian . All of these stages were defined in southern Europe . In addition to this international subdivision, various regional subdivisions are often used. Before a change finally confirmed in 2009 by the International Union of Geological Sciences , the time boundary between the Pleistocene
Pleistocene
and the preceding Pliocene
Pliocene
was regarded as being at 1.806 million years Before Present (BP), as opposed to the currently accepted 2.588 million years BP: publications from the preceding years may use either definition of the period
[...More...]

"Pleistocene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

List Of Mountain Types
Mountains and hills can be characterized in several ways. Some mountains are volcanoes and can be characterized by the type of lava and eruptive history. Other mountains are shaped by glacial processes and can be characterized by their shape. Finally, many mountains can be characterized by the type of rock that make up their composition
[...More...]

"List Of Mountain Types" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Stratovolcano
A STRATOVOLCANO, also known as a COMPOSITE VOLCANO, is a conical volcano built up by many layers (strata) of hardened lava , tephra , pumice , and volcanic ash . Unlike shield volcanoes , stratovolcanoes are characterized by a steep profile and periodic explosive eruptions and effusive eruptions , although some have collapsed craters called calderas . The lava flowing from stratovolcanoes typically cools and hardens before spreading far due to high viscosity. The magma forming this lava is often felsic , having high-to-intermediate levels of silica (as in rhyolite , dacite , or andesite ), with lesser amounts of less-viscous mafic magma. Extensive felsic lava flows are uncommon, but have travelled as far as 15 km (9.3 mi). Stratovolcanoes are sometimes called "composite volcanoes" because of their composite layered structure built up from sequential outpourings of eruptive materials. They are among the most common types of volcanoes, in contrast to the less common shield volcanoes. Two famous stratovolcanoes are Krakatoa , best known for its catastrophic eruption in 1883 and Vesuvius , famous for its destruction of the towns Pompeii and Herculaneum in 79 CE . Both eruptions claimed thousands of lives. In modern times, Mount Saint Helens and Mount Pinatubo have erupted catastrophically. Existence of stratovolcanoes has not been proved on other terrestrial bodies of the solar system with one exception
[...More...]

"Stratovolcano" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.