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Taekkyon
Taekkyon is a traditional Korean martial art first explicitly recorded during the Joseon
Joseon
Dynasty. Taekkyeon
Taekkyeon
is characterized by fluid, dynamic foot movement called "pum balgi" or Stepping-on-Triangles. Taekkyon is concerned with applying both the hands and feet at the same time to unbalance, trip, or throw the opponent. Hands and feet are always used together. Taekkyon has many leg and whole-body techniques with fully integrated armwork. Although taekkyeon primarily utilizes kicking, punching, and arm strikes thrown from a mobile stance and does not provide a framework for groundfighting, it does incorporate a variety of different throws, takedowns, and grappling techniques to complement its striking focus
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Hi! Seoul Festival
Hi! Seoul
Seoul
Festival
Festival
is a seasonal cultural festival held four times a year every spring, summer, autumn, and winter in Seoul, South Korea since 2003. It is based on the " Seoul
Seoul
Citizens' Day" held on every October since 1994 to commemorate the 600 years history of Seoul
Seoul
as the capital of the country. The festival contains booths from different countries which sell their own food types, clothing and other items. There are various Korean traditional and cultural booths that lets you experience the making of different traditional dishes and also trying on the national dress, the hanbok. Numerous activities are included in this festival
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Weapon
A weapon, arm, or armament is any device used with intent to inflict damage or harm to living creatures, structures, or systems. Weapons are used to increase the efficacy and efficiency of activities such as hunting, crime, law enforcement, self-defense, and warfare. In broader context, weapons may be construed to include anything used to gain a strategic, material or mental advantage over an adversary or enemy target. While ordinary objects such as sticks, stones, cars, or pencils can be used as weapons, many are expressly designed for the purpose – ranging from simple implements such as clubs, swords and guns, to complicated modern intercontinental ballistic missiles, biological and cyberweapons
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Choi Kwang-Do
Choi Kwang Do is a martial art developed by Kwang Jo Choi. The style relies more on flexibility and fluidity of movement as opposed to the more rigid lines of some other martial arts. To achieve this it employs yoga-based stretching to develop the flexibility of practitioners.[1]Contents1 History 2 Style and training 3 Practitioners 4 Principles of Choi Kwang Do 5 Choi Kwang Do commands 6 Choi Kwang-Do Grading Information 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] Choi Kwang Do was founded by Kwang Jo Choi on March 2, 1987
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Gwonbeop
Gwonbeop
Gwonbeop
is a system of unarmed methods in Korean martial arts
Korean martial arts
which was developed during the Joseon era
Joseon era
(15th to 19th centuries). It is the Korean rendition of the Chinese quan fa (拳法).Contents1 Early history 2 Later development 3 Modern history 4 Contents and structure4.1 Ji Xiao Xin Shu ("Manual of New Military Tactics") 4.2 Muye Jebo ("Martial Arts Illustrations") 4.3 Muye Dobo Tong Ji (“Comprehensive Illustrated Manual of Martial Arts”) 4.4 Analysis of methods and applications5 Notes 6 References 7 Further reading 8 See also 9 External linksEarly history[edit] Destruction of the Korean palace and its libraries in 1126 and the 1231 Mongol invasion and domination of Korea
Korea
(Yuan dynasty, 1231-1356) eliminated Korea's prior literary history, and no first-hand accounts of the origins of gwonbeop are extant
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Kyokushin
Kyokushin
Kyokushin
(極真) is a style of stand-up, full contact karate, founded in 1964 by Korean-Japanese Masutatsu Oyama
Masutatsu Oyama
(大山倍達, Ōyama Masutatsu)
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Taekwondo
Taekwondo
Taekwondo
(UK: /ˌtaɪkwɒnˈdoʊ/,[1] /ˌtaɪˈkwɒndoʊ/,[2] US: /ˈtaɪˈkwɒnˈdoʊ/;[3] from Korean 태권도 [tʰɛ.k͈wʌn.do] ( listen)) is a Korean martial art, characterized by its emphasis on head-height kicks, jumping and spinning kicks, and fast kicking techniques. Taekwondo
Taekwondo
was developed during the 1940s and 1950s by Korean martial artists with experience in martial arts such as karate, Chinese martial arts, and indigenous Korean martial arts
Korean martial arts
traditions such as Taekkyeon, Subak, and Gwonbeop.[4][5] The oldest governing body for taekwondo is the Korea Taekwondo Association
Korea Taekwondo Association
(KTA), formed in 1959 through a collaborative effort by representatives from the nine original kwans, or martial arts schools, in Korea
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Tae Soo Do
Taekwondo Hwa Rang DoCountry of origin KoreaTae Soo DoHangul 태수도Revised Romanization Tae-su-doMcCune–Reischauer T'ae-su-doTae Soo Do is a name that has been used over the years by both the Taekwondo and the Hwa Rang Do communities. In relation to Taekwondo, it was the name that some major schools in South Korea agreed to call their martial art systems due to reactions to controversies within the Taekwondo communities in the early 1960s. In relation to Hwa Rang Do, Tae Soo Do is the name of their introductory program to help students develop their fundamentals and help prepare them for their training in Hwa Rang Do. Modern day Tae Soo Do/ Hwa Rang Do has no connection with Taekwondo and one should not be mistaken for the other. Previous Use in Relation to Taekwondo[edit] Main article: Taekwondo In 1961, the name Taekwondo was temporarily dropped by members of the Taekwondo community due to controversies that arose between various schools and practitioners
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Soo Bahk Do
Soo Bahk Do is a martial art founded and taught by Kwan Jang Nim Hwang Kee, his successor Hwang Hyun Chul, known as H.C. Hwang, and instructors who are certified by member organizations of the World Moo Duk Kwan, Inc. This martial art was originally the ancient martial art of Korea. Hwang Kee created Moo Duk Kwan
Moo Duk Kwan
with influence from "Soo Bahk Do" [1]Contents1 Features 2 Ranks 3 See also 4 External links 5 ReferencesFeatures[edit] Soo Bahk Do is notable for its use of strong, deep stances as in Shotokan Karate, while also emphasizing a very active use of the hip to help generate force in each movement performed
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Grappling
In hand-to-hand combat, grappling is a close fighting technique used to gain a physical advantage such as improving relative position, or causing injury to the opponent. Grappling
Grappling
covers techniques used in many disciplines, styles and martial arts that are practiced both as combat sports and for self-defense. Grappling
Grappling
most commonly does not include striking or the use of weapons
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Hapki Yusul
Hapkiyusul (Hangul: 합기유술) is a Korean martial art derived from Japanese Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu
Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu
as it was brought to Korea
Korea
by Choi Yong Sul.Contents1 Hapkido
Hapkido
and Hapkiyusul 2 Hapkiyusul in the World 3 See also 4 References 5 External links Hapkido
Hapkido
and Hapkiyusul[edit] Choi Yong Sul
Choi Yong Sul
(Hangul: 최용술) is often seen as the source of Korean hapkido
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Gungdo
The Korean Bow (Korean: 각궁, Gak-gung hanja: 角弓, or horn bow) is a water buffalo horn-based composite reflex bow, standardized centuries ago from a variety of similar weapons in earlier use. Due to its long use by Koreans, it is also known as Guk Gung (Korean: 국궁 hanja: 國弓, or national bow). The Korean bow utilizes a thumb draw and therefore employing the use of a thumb ring is quite common
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Hankumdo
Hankumdo
Hankumdo
is a Korean sword-art where the basic techniques are based on the letters of the Korean alphabet, Hangul.Contents1 Goal 2 History 3 Meaning 4 Style 5 Techniques 6 Development 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksGoal[edit] The goal of hankumdo is to teach people how to defend themselves and at the same time offer them exercises to stay healthy. It also is meant to give practitioners the means to come to a deeper understanding of martial arts principles. It aims to make this easy by using the Korean writing system to systematize the techniques.[1] History[edit] Hankumdo
Hankumdo
was developed by Myung Jae Nam, who first taught his sword techniques as a separate art in 1986 and was first publicized in 1997 during the 3rd International H.K.D Games. Hankumdo
Hankumdo
originated from the techniques used in Hankido to defend against sword attacks
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Korean Swordsmanship
Since the 1970s, there has been a revival of traditional or reconstructed methods of swordsmanship (劍術 geom sul, or 劍法 geom beop) based on the Korean sword in the Republic of Korea (Korean Bon Kuk Geom Beop 본국검법 "National Sword Methods"), supplementing the practice of Kumdo (the Korean adoption of modern Japanese Kendo)
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Kumdo
Kumdo
Kumdo
is a modern Korean martial art derived from Japanese Kendo. Though romanized in a number ways when written Kǒmdo or Geomdo the meaning remains "the way of the sword" and is cognate with the Japanese term. As a martial art, Kumdo
Kumdo
has become accepted in Korean culture and society since its introduction from Japan to the degree that the term "Kumdo" has, in recent history, become a generic label for other Korean martial arts
Korean martial arts
based upon swordsmanship. As a result, caution should be exercised to avoid confusion among practices espousing martial (i.e., Hankumdo) rather than sporting and competitive goals. Although related to Japanese Kendo, minor differences exist in Korean Kumdo
Kumdo
due to appropriation and acculturation
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