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Suhung
Suhung
Suhung
(reign 1674–1675 CE) was a king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
who ruled for a very short period. While most of the chronicles put the number of days of his reign as 20, in some chronicles the duration of his reign was shown as one month and fifteen days.[1] Suhung
Suhung
was installed as king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
by Debera Borbarua after the latter poisoned Ahom king Ramdhwaj Singha. His reign was characterized by the atrocities committed by his minister Debera Borbarua
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Burhagohain
Buragohain (Ahom language:Chao Phrang Mong) was the first of the two original counsellors in the Ahom kingdom. He was selected by the Ahom king from members of the Ahom nobility (Satgharia Ahom), who was not eligible for the position of Ahom kingship. The other original counsellor is the Borgohain. Both the positions existed from the time of the first Ahom king, Sukaphaa
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Moidam
Maidams (Assamese language: মৈদাম moidam) are tumuli of the royalty and aristocracy of the medieval Ahom Kingdom (1228-1826) in Assam. The royal maidams are found exclusively at Charaideo, near Sibasagar; whereas other maidams are found scattered in the region between Jorhat and Dibrugarh towns. Structurally, a maidam consists of vaults with one or more chambers.[1] The vaults have a domical superstructure that are covered by a hemispherical earthen mound that rises high above the ground with an open pavilion at the peak called chow chali. An octagonal dwarf wall encloses the entire maidam. The structural construction and the process of royal burials are explained in historical documents called Chang-Rung Phukanor Buranji, which detail even the articles that were buried. Later excavations under the Archaeological Survey of India found some of the maidams previously defiled,[2] with the articles mentioned in the Buranji missing
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Lachit Borphukan
Lachit Borphukan (Assamese: লাচিত বৰফুকন ) was a commander and Borphukan in the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
known for his leadership in the 1671 Battle of Saraighat
Battle of Saraighat
that thwarted a drawn-out attempt by Mughal forces under the command of Ramsingh I
Ramsingh I
to take back Kamrup.[1][2] He died about a year later due to illness.[3]
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Borphukan
Borphukan (Ahom language: Phu-Kan-Lung) was one of the five patra mantris (councillors) in the Ahom kingdom, a position that was created by the Ahom king Prataap Singha. The position included both executive and judicial powers, with jurisdiction of the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
west of Kaliabor river. Most of the Borphukans belonged to the Ahom-Chutia community.[1] The headquarters of Borphukan was based in Kaliabor and later shifted to Itakhuli in Guwahati
Guwahati
during Lachit Borphukan
Lachit Borphukan
period after the Mughals
Mughals
were ousted from Guwahati. This position was particularly important and powerful because of its distance from the Ahom capital, giving it a semblance of independence. The region to the east of Kaliabor was governed by the Borbarua
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Garhgaon
Gargaon (Pron:/gɑ:ˈgɑ̃ʊ/) was the capital of the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
for many years. It was built by the Ahom king Suklenmung (Gargoyaan Rojaa) in 1540. It lies 13 km east of present-day Sivasagar
Sivasagar
town.[1] The palace structures were made of wood and stones. In 1747 Pramatta Singha, son of Rudra Singha, constructed the brick wall of about 5 km in length surrounding the Gargaon Palace and the masonry gate leading to it. The old palace was destroyed and the present seven-storied palace was rebuilt around 1752 by Rajeswar Singha
Rajeswar Singha
(Suremphaa, 1751–1769).Contents1 Description1.1 Solang ghar 1.2 The palace ground2 Photo gallery 3 See also 4 ReferencesDescription[edit] During the expedition of Mir Jumla in 1662, he was accompanied by a writer named Shihabuddin who wrote a detailed account of the expedition and gave a very full description of the people and the country
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Borbarua
Borbarua (Ahom language: Phu-Ke-Lung) was one of the five patra mantris (councillors) in the Ahom kingdom, a position created by the Ahom king Prataap Singha.[1] The position included both executive and judicial powers, with jurisdiction of the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
east of Kaliabor river and those regions not governed by the three great Gohains, Burhagohain, Borgohain and the Borpatrogohain
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Kachari Kingdom
The Dimasa kingdom (Pron: kəˈʧɑ:rɪ) was a powerful kingdom on the Indian subcontinent, located in the region of Assam, India. The rulers belonged to the Dimasa ethnic group. The Dimasa kingdom and others (Kamata, Chutiya) that developed in the wake of the Kamarupa
Kamarupa
kingdom were led by chieftains of indigenous tribes and are examples of indigenous state formations in Medieval Assam. Remnants of the Dimasa kingdom lingered until the advent of the British, and this kingdom gave its name to two districts in Assam: Cachar
Cachar
and North Cachar
Cachar
Hills ( Dima Hasao
Dima Hasao
district). The origin of the Dimasa Kingdom is not clear.[1] According to tradition, Dimasas had to leave the Kamarupa
Kamarupa
Kingdom in the ancient period due to political turmoil
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Assamese Language
AncientDavaka KamarupaMedievalAhom Kingdom Chutiya Kingdom Kachari Kingdom Kamata Kingdom Baro-BhuyanColonialColonial Assam Assam
Assam
ProvincePeopleAhoms Assamese Brahmins Muslims Assamese Sikhs[7]Kalitas Kaibartas SutiyasTribes Bodos
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Buranji
Buranjis are a class of historical chronicles, written initially in the Ahom[1] and afterwards in Assamese language.[2][3] The first such Buranji was written on the instructions of the first Ahom king Sukaphaa
Sukaphaa
who established the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
in 1228. There were two kinds of Buranjis: one maintained by the state (official) and the other maintained by families.[4] Many such manuscripts were written by scribes under the office of the Likhakar Barua, which were based on state papers, diplomatic correspondences, judicial proceedings, etc. Others were written by nobles or by people under their supervision, sometimes anonymously. These documents reveal chronology of events, language, culture, society and the inner workings of the state machinery of the kingdom
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Sukaphaa
Chaolung Sukaphaa
Sukaphaa
(r. 1228–1268), also Siu-Ka-Pha, the first Ahom king in medieval Assam, was the founder of the Ahom kingdom. A Tai prince originally from Mong Mao, (which is now included within the Dehong-Dai Singhpho Autonomous Prefecture of Yunnan
Yunnan
in Peoples Republic of China), the kingdom he established in 1228 existed for nearly six hundred years and in the process unified the various tribal and non-tribal peoples of the region that left a deep impact on the region
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Sujangphaa
Sujangphaa
Sujangphaa
was the king of the Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
from 1407 CE to 1422 CE. He was the eldest of King Sudangphaa's three sons.[1] After the death of his father at an early age, Sujangphaa
Sujangphaa
ascended the throne in 1407 CE. Nothing of any importance was recorded in the chronicles of Ahom during his fifteen year long reign.[2] He died in 1422 CE and was succeeded by his son, Suphakphaa. See also[edit]Ahom Dynasty Assam Sibsagar district Singarigharutha ceremony SukaphaaNotes[edit]^ (Barua 2008, p. 58) ^ (Gait 1926, p. 84)References[edit]Barua, Gunaviram (2008). Assam
Assam
Buranji or A History of Assam
Assam
(4 ed.). Guwahati: Assam
Assam
publication Board.  Gait, E A (1926). A History of Assam
Assam
(2 ed.)
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Suphakphaa
Suphakphaa was the king of Ahom kingdom from 1422 CE to 1439 CE. He was the son of king Sujangphaa. Suphakphaa succeeded his father in 1422 CE and reigned for seventeen years. Nothing of any importance was recorded by Ahom chronicles about his reign.[1] He died in 1439 CE and was succeeded by his son, Susenphaa. See also[edit]Ahom dynasty Ahom kingdom Assam Charaideo Sibsagar district Singarigharutha ceremony SukaphaaNotes[edit]^ (Gait 1926, p. 84)References[edit]Gait, E A (1926). A History of Assam (2 ed.). Calcutta: Thackar, Spink and Co. This biography of a member of an Indian royal house is a stub
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Jogeswar Singha
Jogeswar Singha
Jogeswar Singha
was installed as the king of Ahom kingdom
Ahom kingdom
in 1821 CE, by the Burmese. He was more or less a puppet in the hands of the Burmese, who held the real power of administration. His reign witnessed Burmese atrocities on the people of Assam
Assam
and the attempts made by Chandrakanta Singha
Chandrakanta Singha
and Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
to expel Burmese invaders
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Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
(1818–19, 1833–1838) was the last king of Ahom kingdom in Assam. He was installed as king twice. First time, he was installed by Ruchinath Burhagohain in 1818 CE, after the latter deposed Chandrakanta Singha
Chandrakanta Singha
from the throne. His first reign ended in 1819 CE, during the second Burmese invasion of Assam, when his forces were defeated and the Burmese reinstalled Chandrakanta Singha
Chandrakanta Singha
on the throne. He along with Ruchinath Burhagohain continued their efforts to expel Burmese invaders, by seeking help from British and through armed struggle. After First Anglo-Burmese War, the British East India Company occupied Assam
Assam
from Bumese invaders
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Sudingphaa
Sudingphaa
Sudingphaa
(or Chandrakanta Singha) (Assamese: স্বৰ্গদেউ চন্দ্ৰকান্ত সিংহ) (1811–1818, 1819–1821) was a Tungkhungia king of the Ahom dynasty, who ruled at the climactic of the Ahom kingdom. His reign witnessed the invasion of Burmese on Assam
Assam
and its subsequent occupation by British East India Company. He was installed as King twice. His first reign ended when Ruchinath Burhagohain deposed him and installed Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
in his stead. His second reign ended with his defeat at the hands of the invading Burmese army. He continued his militant efforts to regain his kingdom as well as to keep Purandar Singha
Purandar Singha
at bay. Finally he submitted himself to Burmese who induced him to believe that they will make him king. Instead he was seized and placed in confinement at Rangpur
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