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Sin
In a religious context, sin is the act of transgression against divine law.[1] Sin
Sin
can also be viewed as any thought or action that endangers the ideal relationship between an individual and God; or as any diversion from the perceived ideal order for human living. "To sin" has been defined from a Greek concordance as "to miss the mark".[2]Contents1 Etymology 2 Religions2.1 Bahá'í 2.2 Buddhism 2.3 Christianity 2.4 Hinduism 2.5 Islam 2.6 Judaism 2.7 Mesopotamian tradition 2.8 Shinto3 See also 4 Notes and references 5 Bibliography 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word derives from " Old English
Old English
syn(n), for original *sunjō. The stem may be related to that of Latin 'sons, sont-is' guilty
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Repentance (Christianity)
Repentance
Repentance
is a stage in Christian salvation
Christian salvation
where the believer turns away from sin. As a distinct stage in the ordo salutis its position is disputed, with some theological traditions arguing it occurs prior to faith and the Reformed theological tradition arguing it occurs after faith.[1] In Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
theology repentance is part of the larger theological concept of penance.[2] Generally in the Old Testament
Old Testament
the term repentance comes from the Hebrew word group that means "turn away from".[3]:1007 Sometimes this word group is employed to request a turning from sinful activity (Jeremiah 8:6)
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Divine Law
Divine
Divine
law is any law that is believed by religious adherents to come directly from a divine source, such as the will of God or Gods, in contrast to man-made law. Unlike natural law, which is independent of human beings, divine laws are totally dependent upon human narrators and closely related to different cultures; they may change in human perception in time through new revelation, however, divine laws are eternal and constant, not subject to change. Divine
Divine
laws are contained in sacred religious texts such as the Torah, the Holy Bible, and the Quran. Thomas Aquinas[edit] Main article: Treatise on Law In Thomas Aquinas's Treatise on Law, divine law comes only from revelation or scripture, hence biblical law, and is necessary for human salvation. According to Aquinas, divine law must not be confused with natural law
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Old English
Old English
Old English
(Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc), or Anglo-Saxon,[2] is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland
Scotland
in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain
Great Britain
by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English
Old English
literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest
Norman conquest
of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French
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Fresco
Fresco
Fresco
(plural frescos or frescoes) is a technique of mural painting executed upon freshly laid, or wet lime plaster. Water
Water
is used as the vehicle for the dry-powder pigment to merge with the plaster, and with the setting of the plaster, the painting becomes an integral part of the wall. The word fresco (Italian: affresco) is derived from the Italian adjective fresco meaning "fresh", and may thus be contrasted with fresco-secco or secco mural painting techniques, which are applied to dried plaster, to supplement painting in fresco
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Bahá'í Faith
The Bahá'í Faith
Faith
(/bəˈhɑːiː, -ˈhaɪ/; Persian: بهائی‎ Bahā'i) is a religion teaching the essential worth of all religions, and the unity and equality of all people.[1] Established by Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
in 1863, it initially grew in Iran
Iran
(Persia) and parts of the Middle East, where it has faced ongoing persecution since its inception.[2] Currently it has between 5 and 7 million adherents, known as Bahá'ís, spread out into most of the world's countries and territories.[3][note 1] It grew from the mid-19th-century Bábí religion, whose founder taught that God
God
would soon send a prophet in the manner of Jesus
Jesus
or Muhammad.[4] In 1863, after being banished from his native Iran, Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
announced that he was this prophet
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Three Poisons (Buddhism)
In biology, poisons are substances that cause disturbances in organisms, usually by chemical reaction or other activity on the molecular scale, when an organism absorbs a sufficient quantity.[1][2] The fields of medicine (particularly veterinary) and zoology often distinguish a poison from a toxin, and from a venom. Toxins are poisons produced by organisms in nature, and venoms are toxins injected by a bite or sting (this is exclusive to animals). The difference between venom and other poisons is the delivery method. Industry, agriculture, and other sectors employ poisonous substances for reasons other than their toxicity. Most poisonous industrial compounds have associated material safety data sheets and are classed as hazardous substances. Hazardous substances are subject to extensive regulation on production, procurement and use in overlapping domains of occupational safety and health, public health, drinking water quality standards, air pollution and environmental protection
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The Gospel
In Christianity, the Gospel
Gospel
(Greek: εὐαγγέλιον euangélion; Old English: gospel), or the Good News, is the news of the coming of the Kingdom of God
Kingdom of God
(Mark 1:14-15), and of Jesus's death on the cross and resurrection to restore people's relationship with God. It may also include the descent of the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
upon believers and the second coming of Jesus. The message of good news is described as a narrative in the four canonical gospels. The message of good news is described as theology in many of the New Testament
New Testament
letters
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God In Christianity
God
God
in Christianity
Christianity
is the eternal being who created and preserves all things
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Atonement In Christianity
In western Christian theology, atonement describes how human beings can be reconciled to God through Christ's sacrificial suffering and death.[1] Atonement refers to the forgiving or pardoning of sin in general and original sin in particular through the suffering, death and resurrection of Jesus,[2] enabling the reconciliation between God and his creation
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Christ (title)
In Christianity, Christ[Notes 1] (Greek Χριστός, Christós, meaning "the anointed one") is a title for the saviour and redeemer who would bring salvation to the Jewish people
Jewish people
and mankind. Christians believe Jesus
Jesus
is the Jewish messiah called Christ in both the Hebrew Bible
Bible
and the Christian
Christian
Old Testament. Christ, used by Christians
Christians
as both a name and a title, is synonymous with Jesus.[5][6][7] The role of the Christ in Christianity
Christianity
originated from the concept of the messiah in Judaism
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Expulsion From The Garden Of Eden
The Expulsion from the Garden of Eden (Italian: Cacciata dei progenitori dall'Eden) is a fresco by the Italian Early Renaissance artist Masaccio. The fresco is a single scene from the cycle painted around 1425 by Masaccio, Masolino and others on the walls of the Brancacci Chapel in the church of Santa Maria del Carmine in Florence. It depicts the expulsion of Adam and Eve from the garden of Eden, from the biblical Book of Genesis chapter 3, albeit with a few differences from the canonical account.[1]Contents1 Possible sources of inspiration 2 Cover up and restoration 3 Influence of Michelangelo 4 Differences from Genesis 5 See also 6 ReferencesPossible sources of inspiration[edit] Many possible sources of inspiration have been pointed out that Masaccio may have drawn from
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Tree Of The Knowledge Of Good And Evil
The tree of the knowledge of good and evil (עֵץ הַדַּעַת טוֹב וָרָע‬; Hebrew pronunciation: [Etz ha-daʿat tov wa-raʿ]) is one of two specific trees in the story of the Garden of Eden in Genesis 2–3, along with the tree of life.Contents1 In Genesis1.1 Narrative 1.2 Meaning of good and evil2 Religious views2.1 Judaism 2.2 Christianity 2.3 Islam 2.4 Other cultures 2.5 Ethnomycological hypothesis3 See also 4 References4.1 BibliographyIn Genesis[edit] Narrative[edit] Genesis 2 narrates that God
God
places the first man and woman in a garden with trees of whose fruits they may eat, but forbids them to eat from "the tree of the knowledge of good and evil"
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Faith In Christianity
Faith in Christianity
Christianity
is a central idea taught by Jesus
Jesus
himself in reference to the gospel (Good News).[1] In the understanding of Jesus[clarification needed] it was an act of trust and self-abandonment in which people no longer rely on their own strength and policies but commit themselves to the power and guiding word of him in whom they believe.[2][3] Since the Protestant Reformation
Protestant Reformation
the meaning of this term has been an object of major theological disagreement in Western Christianity
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Forbidden Fruit
Forbidden fruit
Forbidden fruit
is a phrase that originates from the Book of Genesis concerning Adam and Eve
Adam and Eve
in Genesis 2:16–17. In the narrative, Adam and Eve
Eve
eat the fruit of knowledge of good and evil in the Garden of Eden, which they had been commanded not to do by God
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New Testament Greek
Koine Greek (UK English /ˈkɔɪniː/,[1] US English /kɔɪˈneɪ/, /ˈkɔɪneɪ/ or /kiːˈniː/;[2][3]), also known as Alexandrian dialect, common Attic, Hellenistic or Biblical Greek, was the common supra-regional form of Greek spoken and written during Hellenistic and Roman antiquity and the early Byzantine era, or Late Antiquity. It evolved from the spread of Greek following the conquests of Alexander the Great in the 4th century BC, and served as the lingua franca of much of the Mediterranean region and the Middle East during the following centuries. It was based mainly on Attic and related Ionic speech forms, with various admixtures brought about through dialect levelling with other varieties.[4] Koine Greek included styles ranging from more conservative literary forms to the spoken vernaculars of the time.[5] As the dominant language of the Byzantine Empire, it developed further into Medieval Greek, which then turned into Modern Greek
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