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Simca Aronde
The Simca
Simca
Aronde is an automobile which was manufactured by the French automaker Simca
Simca
from 1951 to 1963
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Adelaide
Adelaide
Adelaide
(/ˈædəleɪd/ ( listen) AD-ə-layd)[8] is the capital city of the state of South Australia, and the fifth-most populous city of Australia. In June 2016, Adelaide
Adelaide
had an estimated resident population of 1,324,279.[1] Adelaide
Adelaide
is home to more than 75 percent of the South Australian population, making it the most centralised population of any state in Australia. Adelaide
Adelaide
is north of the Fleurieu Peninsula, on the Adelaide
Adelaide
Plains between the Gulf St Vincent
Gulf St Vincent
and the low-lying Mount Lofty Ranges
Mount Lofty Ranges
which surround the city
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French Automobile Club
The Automobile Club of France (French: Automobile Club de France) (ACF) is a men's club founded on November 12, 1895 by Albert de Dion, Paul Meyan, and its first president, the Dutch-born Baron, Etienne van Zuylen van Nijevelt. The Automobile Club of France, also known in French as "ACF" or "l'Auto", was initially located near the Paris Opera and benefited from a villa in the Bois de Boulogne. In 1898, the club moved to the exceptional site of the former "Place Louis XV" (currently Place de la Concorde) in order to offer its members more comfort in a prestigious setting
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Solex
Solex
Solex
is a French manufacturer of carburetors and the powered bicycle VéloSoleX. Solex
Solex
carburetors were used by many top European automobile marques, such as Rolls-Royce, Citroën, Porsche, Volkswagen, SAAB, and Mercedes Benz. They were also licensed, with Japanese maker Mikuni supplying them to Toyota, Suzuki, Yamaha, and others.Contents1 History 2 Carburetors2.1 License3 Powered bicycles 4 Company timeline 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The Solex
Solex
company was founded by Marcel Mennesson and Maurice Goudard to manufacture vehicle radiators
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Coachbuilder
A coachbuilder is a manufacturer of bodies for passenger-carrying vehicles.[note 1] Coachwork is the body of an automobile or a bus or a horse-drawn passenger vehicle. The word "coach" was derived from the Hungarian town of Kocs.[1] By extension, "coach" also may be used for a railroad passenger car or railway carriage. Custom or bespoke bodies require a rolling chassis to avoid the vast expense of designing and building a suitable unibody or monocoque structure. While the enormous cost of suitable machinery to make steel structures may be avoided by moulding synthetic materials for one-off bodies the high costs of structural design and development remain prohibitively expensive. As well as true custom or bespoke bodies, coachbuilders also made short runs of more-or-less identical bodies to the order of dealers or the manufacturer of a chassis. The same body design might then be adjusted to suit different brands of chassis
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Paris Motor Show
The Paris
Paris
Motor Show (French: Mondial de l'Automobile) is a biennial auto show in Paris. Held during October, it is one of the most important auto shows,[1] often with many new production automobile and concept car debuts. The show presently takes place in Paris
Paris
expo Porte de Versailles. The Mondial is scheduled by the Organisation Internationale des Constructeurs d'Automobiles, which considers it a major international auto show. In 2014, the Paris
Paris
Motor Show welcomed 1,253,513 visitors, making it the most visited auto show in the world, ahead of Tokyo and Frankfurt. Until 1986, it was called the Salon de l'Automobile; it took the name Mondial de l'Automobile in 1988
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Renault
Coordinates: 48°49′53″N 2°13′42″E / 48.831455°N 2.228273°E / 48.831455; 2.228273 Renault
Renault
S
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Renault 4CV
The Renault
Renault
4CV (French: quatre chevaux, pronounced [kat.ʃəvo] as if spelled quat'chevaux)[5] is a rear-engined, rear-wheel-drive, 4-door economy supermini manufactured and marketed by the French manufacturer Renault
Renault
from August 1947 through July 1961.[2] It was the first French car to sell over a million units, and was superseded by the Dauphine. The 4CV was of monocoque construction,[2] 3.6 m (11 ft 10 in) in length with front suicide doors[6] and using Renault's Ventoux engine in a rear-engine, rear-wheel drive layout. CV is the abbreviation of cheval-vapeur, the French equivalent to "horsepower" as a unit of power
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Automobiles L. Rosengart
Contents1 The founder 2 Beginnings 3 War and aftermath 4 Postwar 5 The Ariette 6 The end 7 References 8 External linksThe founder[edit] Main article: Lucien Rosengart Lucien Rosengart
Lucien Rosengart
(1881 - 1976) was a gifted engineer and businessman who had established a successful engineering business by the time he was 24. In the mid-1920s, he saw the opportunity to produce a very small car for a segment of the market in France that he believed was not being properly covered by any of the major players. He therefore purchased, in 1923, a license to build the English Austin 7
Austin 7
and with support from the engineer Jules Salomon he purchased the old Bellanger factory in the 17th arrondissement of Paris
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Renault Frégate
The Renault
Renault
Frégate is an executive saloon car produced by the French automaker Renault
Renault
between 1951 and 1960. Estate variants, the Renault Domaine and the Renault
Renault
Manoir, were introduced in 1956 and 1958 respectively.[2]Contents1 Origins 2 Launch 3 Evolution 4 Domaine and Manoir 5 Commercial 6 Epilogue 7 Pierre Lefaucheux 8 ReferencesOrigins[edit] The Frégate was conceived in the years immediately following World War II. Renault, which then had recently been brought under control of the French state, needed a new modern, upmarket model both to improve its image and to cater to the needs of middle class consumers in the hoped for economic recovery
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Henri Pigozzi
Henri Théodore Pigozzi (born Enrico Teodoro Pigozzi in Turin, 26 June 1898 – died in Neuilly-sur-Seine, 18 November 1964) was a car merchant and industrialist, mostly known for founding Société Industrielle de Mécanique et de Carrosserie Automobile (Simca). In 1912 his father disappeared, leaving Pigozzi, age 14, to take responsibility for his mother, his sister, and a small transport business. In 1918, after the war, he secured the distribution rights for British and US motorcycles in the Piedmont
Piedmont
region, selling surplus machines from the military stocks of the allied armies. Between 1920 and 1922 he worked for a firm that imported coal from the Saarland. In 1924 he set up his own business, importing scrap steel from France
France
which was needed by the Piedmontese steel mills
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Autodrome De Linas-Montlhéry
Autodrome de Montlhéry
Montlhéry
(established 4 October 1924) is a motor racing circuit, officially called L’autodrome de Linas-Montlhéry, located south-west of the small town of Montlhéry
Montlhéry
about thirty kilometres south of Paris.Contents1 History 2 Motorcar races 3 Motorcycle races 4 Other events 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]L’autodrome de Linas- Montlhéry
Montlhéry
year 1923Industrialist Alexandre Lamblin hired René Jamin to design the 2,548.24 metres (1.58 mi) oval shaped track for up to 1,000 kg (2,205 lb) vehicles at 220 km/h (140 mph). It was initially called Autodrome parisien, and had especially high banking. A road circuit was added in 1925. The first race there, the 1925 French Grand Prix, was held on 26 July 1925 and organised by The Automobile Club de France Grand Prix
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The Motor (magazine)
An engine or motor is a machine designed to convert one form of energy into mechanical energy.[1][2] Heat
Heat
engines burn a fuel to create heat which is then used to do work. Electric motors convert electrical energy into mechanical motion; pneumatic motors use compressed air; and clockwork motors in wind-up toys use elastic energy
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Transmission (mechanics)
A transmission is a machine in a power transmission system, which provides controlled application of the power. Often the term transmission refers simply to the gearbox that uses gears and gear trains to provide speed and torque conversions from a rotating power source to another device.[1][2] In British English, the term transmission refers to the whole drivetrain, including clutch, gearbox, prop shaft (for rear-wheel drive), differential, and final drive shafts. In American English, however, the term refers more specifically to the gearbox alone, and detailed usage differs.[note 1] The most common use is in motor vehicles, where the transmission adapts the output of the internal combustion engine to the drive wheels. Such engines need to operate at a relatively high rotational speed, which is inappropriate for starting, stopping, and slower travel. The transmission reduces the higher engine speed to the slower wheel speed, increasing torque in the process
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Autodrome De Montlhéry
Autodrome de Montlhéry
Montlhéry
(established 4 October 1924) is a motor racing circuit, officially called L’autodrome de Linas-Montlhéry, located south-west of the small town of Montlhéry
Montlhéry
about thirty kilometres south of Paris.Contents1 History 2 Motorcar races 3 Motorcycle races 4 Other events 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]L’autodrome de Linas- Montlhéry
Montlhéry
year 1923Industrialist Alexandre Lamblin hired René Jamin to design the 2,548.24 metres (1.58 mi) oval shaped track for up to 1,000 kg (2,205 lb) vehicles at 220 km/h (140 mph). It was initially called Autodrome parisien, and had especially high banking. A road circuit was added in 1925. The first race there, the 1925 French Grand Prix, was held on 26 July 1925 and organised by The Automobile Club de France Grand Prix
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Cabriolet
A convertible or cabriolet (/ˌkæbrioʊˈleɪ/ KAB-ree-oh-LAY) is an automobile body style that can convert between an open-air mode and an enclosed one, varying in degree and means by model. Convertibles evolved from the earlier phaeton, an open vehicle without glass side windows that sometimes had removable panels of fabric or other material for protection from the elements. Historically, a retractable roof consisted of an articulated frame covered with a folding, textile-based fabric similar to that on an open carriage evolved into the most common form. A lesser seen detachable hardtop provided a more weatherproof and secure alternative. As technology improved, a retractable hardtop which removes and stows its own rigid roof in its trunk appeared, increasingly becoming the most popular form. A semiconvertible also known as a cabrio coach has a retractable or removable top which retains fully framed windows on its doors and side glass
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