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Sentō
Sentō
Sentō
(銭湯) is a type of Japanese communal bath house where customers pay for entrance. Traditionally these bath houses have been quite utilitarian, with a tall barrier separating the sexes within one large room, a minimum of lined up faucets on both sides and a single large bath for the already washed bathers to sit in among others. Since the second half of the 20th century, these communal bath houses have been decreasing in numbers as more and more Japanese residences now have baths. Some Japanese find social importance in going to public baths, out of the theory that physical proximity/intimacy brings emotional intimacy, which is termed skinship in pseudo-English Japanese
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Jacuzzi
Jacuzzi Brands Corp. ("Jacuzzi") is an Italian American[2] corporation that produces whirlpool bathtubs and hot tub spas. Its first product was a bath with massaging jets. JACUZZI is a federally registered trademark of Jacuzzi Inc. as of September 5, 1978.[3]Contents1 History 2 Recent activities 3 Jacuzzi aircraft 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Founded in 1915 by seven brothers, led by Giocondo Jacuzzi, Jacuzzi and Brothers made wooden propellers under military contracts, based at 2043 San Pablo Avenue, Berkeley, California. In 1920 the brothers also dabbled briefly with aircraft design and manufacture, with a single-seat monoplane and a seven-seat cabin monoplane.[4] Both aircraft were noted for their use of laminated wood products for fuselage manufacture, but were essentially unsuccessful, with only one of each type being built
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India
India, officially the Republic
Republic
of India
India
(IAST: Bhārat Gaṇarājya),[e] is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country (with over 1.2 billion people), and the most populous democracy in the world. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean
Indian Ocean
on the south, the Arabian Sea on the southwest, and the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
on the southeast. It shares land borders with Pakistan
Pakistan
to the west;[f] China, Nepal, and Bhutan
Bhutan
to the northeast; and Myanmar
Myanmar
and Bangladesh
Bangladesh
to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India
India
is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and the Maldives
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Pumice
Pumice
Pumice
( /ˈpʌmɪs/), called pumicite in its powdered or dust form, is a volcanic rock that consists of highly vesicular rough textured volcanic glass, which may or may not contain crystals. It is typically light colored. Scoria
Scoria
is another vesicular volcanic rock that differs from pumice in having larger vesicles, thicker vesicle walls and being dark colored and denser.[1][2] Pumice
Pumice
is created when super-heated, highly pressurized rock is violently ejected from a volcano. The unusual foamy configuration of pumice happens because of simultaneous rapid cooling and rapid depressurization. The depressurization creates bubbles by lowering the solubility of gases (including water and CO2) that are dissolved in the lava, causing the gases to rapidly exsolve (like the bubbles of CO2 that appear when a carbonated drink is opened)
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Cosmetics
Cosmetics
Cosmetics
are substances or products used to enhance or alter the appearance or fragrance of the body. Many cosmetics are designed for use of applying to the face and hair. They are generally mixtures of chemical compounds; some being derived from natural sources (such as coconut oil), and some being synthetics.[1] Common cosmetics include lipstick, mascara, eye shadow, foundation, rouge, skin cleansers and skin lotions, shampoo, hairstyling products (gel, hair spray, etc.), perfume and cologne. Cosmetics
Cosmetics
applied to the face to enhance its appearance are often called make-up or makeup. In the U.S., the Food and Drug Administration
Food and Drug Administration
(FDA), which regulates cosmetics,[2] defines cosmetics as "intended to be applied to the human body for cleansing, beautifying, promoting attractiveness, or altering the appearance without affecting the body's structure or functions"
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Hokkaidō
Hokkaido
Hokkaido
(北海道, Hokkaidō, literally "Northern Sea Circuit") (Japanese: [hokkaꜜidoː] ( listen)), formerly known as Ezo, Yezo, Yeso, or Yesso, is the second largest island of Japan, and the largest and northernmost prefecture. The Tsugaru Strait separates Hokkaido
Hokkaido
from Honshu.[1] The two islands are connected by the undersea railway Seikan Tunnel. The largest city on Hokkaido
Hokkaido
is its capital, Sapporo, which is also its only ordinance-designated city
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Yakuza
Principal clans:Yamaguchi-gumi Sumiyoshi-kai Inagawa-kai Yakuza
Yakuza
(Japanese: ヤクザ, [jaꜜkɯza]), also known as gokudō (極道, "the extreme path"), are members of transnational organized crime syndicates originating in Japan. The Japanese police, and media by request of the police, call them bōryokudan (暴力団, "violent groups"), while the yakuza call themselves "ninkyō dantai" (任侠団体 or 仁侠団体, "chivalrous organizations"). The yakuza are notorious for their strict codes of conduct and their organized fiefdom-nature
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Legionella
Legionella
Legionella
adelaidensis[1] Legionella
Legionella
anisa[1] Legionella
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Chlorine
Chlorine
Chlorine
is a chemical element with symbol Cl and atomic number 17. The second-lightest of the halogens, it appears between fluorine and bromine in the periodic table and its properties are mostly intermediate between them. Chlorine
Chlorine
is a yellow-green gas at room temperature. It is an extremely reactive element and a strong oxidising agent: among the elements, it has the highest electron affinity and the third-highest electronegativity, behind only oxygen and fluorine. The most common compound of chlorine, sodium chloride (common salt), has been known since ancient times. Around 1630, chlorine gas was first synthesised in a chemical reaction, but not recognised as a fundamentally important substance. Carl Wilhelm Scheele
Carl Wilhelm Scheele
wrote a description of chlorine gas in 1774, supposing it to be an oxide of a new element
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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China
China, officially the People's Republic
People's Republic
of China
China
(PRC), is a unitary sovereign state in East Asia
East Asia
and the world's most populous country, with a population of around 1.404 billion.[13] Covering approximately 9,600,000 square kilometers (3,700,000 sq mi), it is the third- or fourth-largest country by total area,[k][19] depending on the source consulted. China
China
also has the most neighbor countries in the world
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Sansuke
Sansuke
Sansuke
(三助) are the working staff that provide many services at the Zeniyu (銭湯, public bathhouse) in Japan.Contents1 Etymology of male bathhouse attendant 2 Sansuke
Sansuke
in premodern times 3 Nagashi 4 Kodakara no yu and Sansuke 5 Sansuke
Sansuke
during early-modern times 6 Sansuke
Sansuke
today 7 Reference books 8 ReferencesEtymology of male bathhouse attendant[edit] Various theories exist to explain the derivation of Sansuke. In Japanese, Sansuke
Sansuke
originally meant three types of services: kamataki (stoking of the boiler), yukagen wo miru (checking the temperature of the bath water), and bandai (fee collection). It was an occasional duty for the Sansuke
Sansuke
to provide the services of scrubbing and grooming the customer
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Taishō Period
The Taishō period
Taishō period
(大正時代, Taishō jidai), or Taishō era, is a period in the history of Japan
Japan
dating from July 30, 1912, to December 25, 1926, coinciding with the reign of the Emperor Taishō.[1] The new emperor was a sickly man, which prompted the shift in political power from the old oligarchic group of elder statesmen (or genrō) to the Imperial Diet of Japan
Japan
and the democratic parties
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Torii Kiyonaga
This article is about the ukiyo-e artist; for samurai named Kiyonaga, see Naito Kiyonaga and Koriki Kiyonaga. In this Japanese name, the family name is Torii. Torii Kiyonaga
Torii Kiyonaga
(Japanese: 鳥居 清長; 1752 – June 28, 1815) was a Japanese ukiyo-e artist of the Torii school. Originally Sekiguchi Shinsuke, the son of an Edo
Edo
bookseller, he took on Torii Kiyonaga as an art name. Although not biologically related to the Torii family, he became head of the group after the death of his adoptive father and teacher Torii Kiyomitsu. The master Kiyomitsu died in 1785; since his son died young, and Kiyotsune, Kiyonaga's senior, was a less promising artist, Kiyonaga was the obvious choice to succeed Kiyomitsu to leadership of the Torii school
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Matthew C. Perry
Matthew Calbraith Perry[Note 1] (April 10, 1794 – March 4, 1858) was a Commodore of the United States
United States
Navy who commanded ships in several wars, including the War of 1812
War of 1812
and the Mexican–American War (1846–48). He played a leading role in the opening of Japan
Japan
to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa
Convention of Kanagawa
in 1854. Perry was interested in the education of naval officers, and assisted in the development of an apprentice system that helped establish the curriculum at the United States
United States
Naval Academy
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Kantō Region
The Kantō region
Kantō region
(関東地方, Kantō-chihō) is a geographical area of Honshu, the largest island of Japan.[3] The region includes the Greater Tokyo Area
Greater Tokyo Area
and encompasses seven prefectures: Gunma, Tochigi, Ibaraki, Saitama, Tokyo, Chiba, and Kanagawa. Within its boundaries, slightly more than 45 percent of the land area is the Kantō Plain. The rest consists of the hills and mountains that form the land borders
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