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Royal Small Arms Factory
The Royal Small Arms Factory
Royal Small Arms Factory
(RSAF) was a UK government-owned rifle factory in the London Borough of Enfield
London Borough of Enfield
in an area generally known as the Lea Valley. The factory produced British military rifles, muskets and swords from 1816. It closed in 1988, but some of its work was transferred to other sites.Contents1 History1.1 Foundation 1.2 The Crimean War1.2.1 Sparkbrook1.3 20th century2 The significance of RSAF Enfield 3 Weapons designed / built at RSAF Enfield 4 Closure and reuse of the site 5 Community 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksHistory[edit] The RSAF had its origins in a short-lived Royal Manufactory of Small Arms established in Lewisham
Lewisham
in 1807
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List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
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Mass-production
Mass production, also known as flow production or continuous production, is the production of large amounts of standardized products, including and especially on assembly lines. Together with job production and batch production, it is one of the three main production methods.[1] The term mass production was popularized by a 1926 article in the Encyclopædia Britannica supplement that was written based on correspondence with Ford Motor Company
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Privately Held Company
A privately held company, private company, or close corporation is a business company owned either by non-governmental organizations or by a relatively small number of shareholders or company members which does not offer or trade its company stock (shares) to the general public on the stock market exchanges, but rather the company's stock is offered, owned and traded or exchanged privately. More ambiguous terms for a privately held company are unquoted company and unlisted company. Though less visible than their publicly traded counterparts, private companies have major importance in the world's economy. In 2008, the 441 largest private companies in the United States accounted for US$1,800,000,000,000 in revenues and employed 6.2 million people, according to Forbes. In 2005, using a substantially smaller pool size (22.7%) for comparison, the 339 companies on Forbes' survey of closely held U.S
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Leat
A leat (also lete or leet, or millstream) is the name, common in the south and west of England and in Wales
Wales
(Lade in Scotland), for an artificial watercourse or aqueduct dug into the ground, especially one supplying water to a watermill or its mill pond. Other common uses for leats include delivery of water for mineral washing and concentration, for irrigation, to serve a dye works or other industrial plant, and provision of drinking water to a farm or household or as a catchment cut-off to improve the yield of a reservoir. According to the Oxford English Dictionary, leat is cognate with let in the sense of "allow to pass through". Other names for the same thing include fleam (probably a leat supplying water to a mill that did not have a millpool). In parts of northern England, for example around Sheffield, the equivalent word is goit
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Water Wheel
A water wheel is a machine for converting the energy of flowing or falling water into useful forms of power, often in a watermill. A water wheel consists of a wheel (usually constructed from wood or metal), with a number of blades or buckets arranged on the outside rim forming the driving surface. Most commonly, the wheel is mounted vertically on a horizontal axle, but can also be mounted horizontally on a vertical shaft, for example the tub or Norse. Vertical wheels can transmit power either through the axle or via a ring gear and typically drive belts or gears; horizontal wheels usually directly drive their load. Water
Water
wheels were still in commercial use well into the 20th century but they are no longer in common use
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Gun Barrel
A gun barrel is a crucial part of gun-type ranged weapons such as small firearms, artillery pieces and air guns. It is the straight shooting tube, usually made of rigid high-strength metal, through which a contained rapid expansion of high-pressure gas(es) is introduced (via propellant combustion or via mechanical compression) behind a projectile in order to propel it out of the front end (muzzle) at a high velocity. The hollow interior of the barrel is called the bore. The measurement of the diameter of the bore is called the caliber
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Lock (firearm)
The lock of a firearm is the firing mechanism used to ignite the propellant. Types of lock include matchlock, wheellock, snaplock, snaphance, miquelet lock, doglock, flintlock, modern caplock/percussion, and experimental electronic types. Parts of the lock can include the serpentine (for matchlocks), wheel (for wheellocks), cock and frizzen (for flintlocks) or the hammer (for caplocks). A complete muzzleloader consists of lock, stock, and barrel. Locks are typically spoken of when it comes to firearms which use loose ball and powder, and not to metallic Cartridge breech-loading firearms, which are all percussion-based
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Crimean War
223,513  Ottoman Empire 45,400[2] 10,100 killed in action 10,800 died of wounds 24,500 died of disease French Empire 135,485[2] 8,490 killed in action; 11,750 died of wounds; 75,375 died of disease 39,870 wounded  British Empire 40,462[2] 2,755 killed in action 1,847 died of wounds 17,580 died of disease 18,280 wounded  Kingdom of Sardinia 2,166[2] 28 killed in action 2,138 died of disease 530,125[2] 35,671 killed in action 37,454 died of wounds 377,000 died from non-combat causes 80,000 wounded[3][4]v t eCrimean WarBalkansOltenița Sinop Cetate Calafat SilistraCaucasusKurekdere KarsNaval OperationsSuomenlinna Bomarsund PetropavlovskCrimeaAlma Sevastopol Balaclava Inkerman Eupatoria Taganrog Chernaya Malakoff Great Redan Kinburnv t eRusso-Ottoman Wars1568–70 1676–81 1686–1700 1710–11 1735–39 1768–74 1787–92 1806–12 1828–29 1853–56 1877–78 1914–18Russ
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Machine Shop
A machine shop is a room, building, or company where machining is done. In a machine shop, machinists use machine tools and cutting tools to make parts, usually of metal or plastic (but sometimes of other materials such as glass or wood). A machine shop can be a small business (such as a job shop) or a portion of a factory, whether a toolroom or a production area for manufacturing. The parts produced can be the end product of the factory, to be sold to customers in the machine industry, the car industry, the aircraft industry, or others. In other cases, companies in those fields have their own machine shops. The production can consist of cutting, shaping, drilling, finishing, and other processes. The machine tools typically include metal lathes, milling machines, machining centers, multitasking machines, drill presses, or grinding machines, many controlled with computer numerical control (CNC)
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 United States
United States
of AmericaFlagGreat SealMotto:  "In God
God
We Trust"[1][fn 1]Other traditional mottos  "E pluribus unum" (Lat
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Steam Engines
A steam engine is a heat engine that performs mechanical work using steam as its working fluid. Steam
Steam
engines are external combustion engines,[2] where the working fluid is separated from the combustion products. Non-combustion heat sources such as solar power, nuclear power or geothermal energy may be used. The ideal thermodynamic cycle used to analyze this process is called the Rankine cycle. In the cycle, water is heated and changes into steam in a boiler operating at a high pressure. When expanded using pistons or turbines mechanical work is done. The reduced-pressure steam is then exhausted to the atmosphere, or condensed and pumped back into the boiler. In general usage, the term steam engine can refer to either complete steam plants (including boilers etc.) such as railway steam locomotives and portable engines, or may refer to the piston or turbine machinery alone, as in the beam engine and stationary steam engine
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Epping Forest (district)
Epping Forest
Epping Forest
is a local government district in Essex, England. It is named after, and contains a large part of, Epping Forest. The district, though wholly within the county of Essex, is partly contiguous with Greater London
Greater London
to the south and southwest, and the area around Buckhurst Hill, Chigwell, Waltham Abbey and Loughton
Loughton
is statistically part of the Greater London
Greater London
Built-up Area
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Royal Engineers
The Corps of Royal Engineers, usually just called the Royal Engineers (RE), and commonly known as the Sappers, is one of the corps of the British Army. It provides military engineering and other technical support to the British Armed Forces
British Armed Forces
and is headed by the Chief Royal Engineer. The Regimental Headquarters and the Royal School of Military Engineering are in Chatham in Kent, England. The corps is divided into several regiments, barracked at various places in the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
and around the world.Contents1 History 2 Significant constructions2.1 British Columbia 2.2 Royal Albert Hall 2.3 Indian infrastructure 2.4 Rideau Canal 2.5 Dover's Western Heights 2.6 Pentonville Prison 2.7 Boundary Commissions 2.8 Abney Level 2.9 H.M
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Sparkbrook
Sparkbrook
Sparkbrook
is an inner-city area in south-east Birmingham, England. It is one of the four wards forming the Hall Green
Hall Green
formal district within Birmingham
Birmingham
City Council.Contents1 Etymology 2 Politics2.1 Project Champion3 Places of interest 4 Unemployment 5 Demographics 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The area receives its name from Spark Brook, a small stream which flowed south of the city centre
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World War I
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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