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Robotics
Robotics
Robotics
is an interdisciplinary branch of engineering and science that includes mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, computer science, and others. Robotics
Robotics
deals with the design, construction, operation, and use of robots, as well as computer systems for their control, sensory feedback, and information processing. These technologies are used to develop machines that can substitute for humans and replicate human actions. Robots can be used in any situation and for any purpose, but today many are used in dangerous environments (including bomb detection and de-activation), manufacturing processes, or where humans cannot survive. Robots can take on any form but some are made to resemble humans in appearance. This is said to help in the acceptance of a robot in certain replicative behaviors usually performed by people
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Jacques De Vaucanson
Jacques de Vaucanson
Jacques de Vaucanson
(February 24, 1709 – November 21, 1782) was a French inventor and artist who was responsible for the creation of impressive and innovative automata. He also was the first man to design an automatic loom but never developed the idea.Contents1 Early life 2 Automaton inventor 3 Government service 4 Legacy 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEarly life[edit] He was born in Grenoble, France
France
in 1709 as Jacques Vaucanson (the particle "de" was later added to his name by the Académie des Sciences[1]). The tenth child, son of a glove-maker, he grew up poor, and in his youth he reportedly aspired to become a clockmaker. [2] He studied under the Jesuits and later joined the Order of the Minims in Lyon
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Classical Times
Classical antiquity (also the classical era, classical period or classical age) is the long period of cultural history centered on the Mediterranean Sea, comprising the interlocking civilizations of ancient Greece and ancient Rome, collectively known as the Greco-Roman world. It is the period in which Greek and Roman society flourished and wielded great influence throughout Europe, North Africa and Western Asia. Conventionally, it is taken to begin with the earliest-recorded Epic Greek poetry of Homer (8th–7th century BC), and continues through the emergence of Christianity and the decline of the Roman Empire (5th century AD). It ends with the dissolution of classical culture at the close of Late Antiquity (300–600), blending into the Early Middle Ages (600–1000)
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Etymology
Etymology
Etymology
(/ˌɛtɪˈmɒlədʒi/)[1] is the study of the history of words, their origins, and how their form and meaning have changed over time.[1] By extension, the term "the etymology (of a word)" means the origin of the particular word. For a language such as Greek with a long written history, etymologists make use of texts in these languages and texts about the languages to gather knowledge about how words were used during earlier periods of their history and when they entered the languages in question. Etymologists also apply the methods of comparative linguistics to reconstruct information about languages that are too old for any direct information to be available. By analyzing related languages with a technique known as the comparative method, linguists can make inferences about their shared parent language and its vocabulary
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Science Fiction
Science
Science
fiction (often shortened to SF or sci-fi) is a genre of speculative fiction, typically dealing with imaginative concepts such as advanced science and technology, spaceflight, time travel, and extraterrestrial life. Science
Science
fiction often explores the potential consequences of scientific and other innovations, and has been called a "literature of ideas".[1] It usually avoids the supernatural, unlike the related genre of fantasy
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Analog Science Fiction And Fact
Analog Science Fiction and Fact
Analog Science Fiction and Fact
is an American science-fiction magazine published under various titles since 1930. Originally titled Astounding Stories of Super-Science, the first issue was dated January 1930, published by William Clayton, and edited by Harry Bates. Clayton went bankrupt in 1933 and the magazine was sold to Street & Smith. The new editor was F. Orlin Tremaine, who soon made Astounding the leading magazine in the nascent pulp science fiction field, publishing well-regarded stories such as Jack Williamson's Legion of Space and John W. Campbell's "Twilight". At the end of 1937, Campbell took over editorial duties under Tremaine's supervision, and the following year Tremaine was let go, giving Campbell more independence. Over the next few years Campbell published many stories that became classics in the field, including Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, A.E
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Karel Čapek
Karel Čapek
Karel Čapek
(Czech: [ˈkarɛl ˈtʃapɛk] ( listen); 9 January 1890 – 25 December 1938) was a Czech writer of the early 20th century. He had multiple roles throughout his career, including playwright, dramatist, essayist, publisher, literary reviewer, photographer and art critic. Nonetheless, he is best known for his science fiction including his novel War with the Newts
War with the Newts
and the play R.U.R.
R.U.R.
(Rossum's Universal Robots), which introduced the word robot.[1][2] He also wrote many politically charged works dealing with the social turmoil of his time. Largely influenced by American pragmatic liberalism,[3] he campaigned in favor of free expression and utterly despised the rise of both fascism and communism in Europe.[4][5] Čapek was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature
Nobel Prize in Literature
seven times,[6] but he never won
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Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia, or Czecho-Slovakia[1] (/ˌtʃɛkoʊsloʊˈvækiə, -kə-, -slə-, -ˈvɑː-/;[2][3] Czech and Slovak: Československo, Česko-Slovensko[4][5]), was a sovereign state in Central Europe that existed from October 1918, when it declared its independence from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, until its peaceful dissolution into the Czech Republic and Slovakia
Slovakia
on 1 January 1993. From 1939 to 1945, following its forced division and partial incorporation into Nazi Germany, the state did not de facto exist but its government-in-exile continued to operate. From 1948 to 1990, Czechoslovakia
Czechoslovakia
was part of the Soviet bloc with a command economy. Its economic status was formalized in membership of Comecon
Comecon
from 1949 and its defense status in the Warsaw Pact
Warsaw Pact
of May 1955
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Manufacturing
Manufacturing
Manufacturing
is the production of merchandise for use or sale using labour and machines, tools, chemical and biological processing, or formulation. The term may refer to a range of human activity, from handicraft to high tech, but is most commonly applied to industrial production, in which raw materials are transformed into finished goods on a large scale. Such finished goods may be sold to other manufacturers for the production of other, more complex products, such as aircraft, household appliances, furniture, sports equipment or automobiles, or sold to wholesalers, who in turn sell them to retailers, who then sell them to end users and consumers. Manufacturing engineering
Manufacturing engineering
or manufacturing process are the steps through which raw materials are transformed into a final product. The manufacturing process begins with the product design, and materials specification from which the product is made
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Space Exploration
Space exploration
Space exploration
is the ongoing discovery and exploration of celestial structures in outer space by means of continuously evolving and growing space technology. While the study of space is carried out mainly by astronomers with telescopes, the physical exploration of space is conducted both by unmanned robotic space probes and human spaceflight. While the observation of objects in space, known as astronomy, predates reliable recorded history, it was the development of large and relatively efficient rockets during the mid-twentieth century that allowed physical space exploration to become a reality
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Mass Production
Mass production, also known as flow production or continuous production, is the production of large amounts of standardized products, including and especially on assembly lines. Together with job production and batch production, it is one of the three main production methods.[1] The term mass production was popularized by a 1926 article in the Encyclopædia Britannica supplement that was written based on correspondence with Ford Motor Company
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Consumer Goods
In economics, any commodity which is produced and subsequently consumed by the consumer, to satisfy his current wants or needs, is a consumer good or final good. Consumer
Consumer
goods are goods that are ultimately consumed rather than used in the production of another good. For example, a microwave oven or a bicycle which is sold to a consumer is a final good or consumer good, whereas the components which are sold to be used in those goods are called intermediate goods. For example, textiles or transistors which can be used to make some further goods. When used in measures of national income and output, the term "final goods" only includes new goods. For instance, the GDP excludes items counted in an earlier year to prevent double counting of production based on resales of the same item second and third hand
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Lie Zi
The Liezi (Chinese: 列子; Wade–Giles: Lieh-tzu) is a Daoist
Daoist
text attributed to Lie Yukou, a c. 5th century BCE Hundred Schools of Thought philosopher, but Chinese and Western scholars believe it was compiled around the 4th century CE.Contents1 Textual history 2 Contents 3 Authenticity 4 Translations 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksTextual history[edit] The first two references to the Liezi book are from the Former Han Dynasty. The editor Liu Xiang notes he eliminated repetitions in Liezi and rearranged it into eight chapters (pian 篇). The Book of Han bibliography section (藝文志) says it has eight chapters (篇) and concludes that since the Zhuangzi quotes Liezi, he must have lived before Zhuangzi. There is a three-century historical gap until the next evidence of the Liezi: the Jin dynasty commentary by Zhang Zhan 張湛 (fl. ca. 370 CE)
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King Mu Of Zhou
King Mu of Zhou
King Mu of Zhou
(Chinese: 周穆王; pinyin: Zhōu Mù Wáng) was the fifth king of the Zhou dynasty
Zhou dynasty
of China. The dates of his reign are 976–922 BC or 956–918 BC.[1][2]Contents1 Life 2 In mythology 3 Automaton 4 Family4.1 Spouses4.1.1 Queens 4.1.2 Concubines4.2 Issue4.2.1 Sons5 Ancestry 6 See also 7 Notes 8 ReferencesLife[edit] Joseon
Joseon
Korean painting Yoji yeondo (요지연도) depicting King Mu of Zhou visiting the goddess Queen Mother of the West
Queen Mother of the West
at Yaochi in the mythical mountain Kunlun.King Mu came to the throne after his father King Zhao’s death during his tour to the South. King Mu was perhaps the most pivotal king of the Zhou dynasty, reigning nearly 55 years, from ca. 976 BC to ca. 922 BC
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Hero Of Alexandria
Hero of Alexandria
Alexandria
(/ˈhɪəroʊ/; Greek: Ἥρων[1] ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς, Heron ho Alexandreus; also known as Heron of Alexandria
Alexandria
/ˈhɛrən/; c. 10 AD – c. 70 AD) was a mathematician and engineer who was active in his native city of Alexandria, Roman Egypt. He is considered the greatest experimenter of antiquity[2] and his work is representative of the Hellenistic scientific tradition.[3] Hero published a well recognized description of a steam-powered device called an aeolipile (sometimes called a "Hero engine"). Among his most famous inventions was a windwheel, constituting the earliest instance of wind harnessing on land.[4][5] He is said to have been a follower of the atomists
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Bomb Disposal
Bomb
Bomb
disposal is the process by which hazardous explosive devices are rendered safe
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