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Proteales
Nelumbonaceae
Nelumbonaceae
(lotus) Platanaceae
Platanaceae
(plane trees) Proteaceae Sabiaceae Proteales
Proteales
is the botanical name of an order of flowering plants consisting of two (or three) families
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National Center For Biotechnology Information
The National Center for Biotechnology
Biotechnology
Information (NCBI) is part of the United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM), a branch of the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
(NIH). The NCBI is located in Bethesda, Maryland and was founded in 1988 through legislation sponsored by Senator Claude Pepper. The NCBI houses a series of databases relevant to biotechnology and biomedicine and is an important resource for bioinformatics tools and services. Major databases include GenBank
GenBank
for DNA
DNA
sequences and PubMed, a bibliographic database for the biomedical literature. Other databases include the NCBI Epigenomics database
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Magnoliopsida
Magnoliopsida
Magnoliopsida
is a valid botanical name for a class of flowering plants
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Cretaceous
The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
( /krɪˈteɪʃəs/, kri-TAY-shəs) is a geologic period and system that spans 79 million years from the end of the Jurassic
Jurassic
Period 145 million years ago (mya) to the beginning of the Paleogene Period 66 mya. It is the last period of the Mesozoic
Mesozoic
Era. The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period is usually abbreviated K, for its German translation Kreide (chalk). The Cretaceous
Cretaceous
was a period with a relatively warm climate, resulting in high eustatic sea levels that created numerous shallow inland seas. These oceans and seas were populated with now-extinct marine reptiles, ammonites and rudists, while dinosaurs continued to dominate on land. During this time, new groups of mammals and birds, as well as flowering plants, appeared
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Engler System
One of the prime systems of plant taxonomy, the Engler system
Engler system
was devised by Adolf Engler
Adolf Engler
(1844–1930), and is featured in two major taxonomic texts he authored or coauthored. His influence is reflected in the use of the terms "Engler School" and "Engler Era"
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Archichlamydeae
Polypetalae was a taxonomic grouping used in the identification of plants, but it is now considered to be artificial group, one that does not reflect evolutionary history. The grouping was based on similar morphological plant characteristics. Polypetalae was defined as including plants with the petals free from the base or only slightly connected. See also[edit]Plant identification CalycifloraeExternal links[edit]For an illustrated summary of polypetalae, see botanic gardens information John Shaffner's key (1911)in the Ohio Naturalist [1]This botany article is a stub
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APG IV System
A system is a regularly interacting or interdependent group of items forming an integrated whole.[1] Every system is delineated by its spatial and temporal boundaries, surrounded and influenced by its environment, described by its structure and purpose and expressed in its functioning.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Concepts3.1 Subsystem4 Analysis4.1 Cultural system 4.2 Economic system5 Application of the system concept5.1 In information and computer science 5.2 In engineering and physics 5.3 In social and cognitive sciences and management research 5.4 Pure logical systems 5.5 Applied to strategic thinking6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The term "system" comes from the Latin
Latin
word systēma, in turn from Greek σύστημα systēma: "whole concept made of several parts or members, system", literary "composition".[2] History[edit] According to Marshall McLuhan,"System" means "something to look at"
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Angiosperm Phylogeny Website
The Angiosperm
Angiosperm
Phylogeny Website (or APweb) is a well-known[1][2] website dedicated to research on angiosperm phylogeny and taxonomy. The site is hosted by the Missouri Botanical Garden
Missouri Botanical Garden
website and maintained by researchers, Peter F. Stevens and Hilary M. Davis.[3] Peter F. Stevens is a member of the Angiosperm
Angiosperm
Phylogeny Group (APG). The taxonomy presented is broadly based on the work of the APG, with modifications to incorporate new results. References[edit]^ APWebsite is a resource for NCBI (NCBI) ^ A useful site for Kew Gardens (Kew Gardens) ^ Stevens, Peter F. (2006). "The angiosperm phylogeny Website - a tool for reference and teaching in a time of change". Proceedings of the American Society for Information Science and Technology
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Monochlamydeae
Monochlamydae is an artificial taxonomic group[1] used in the identification of plants. It was largely abandoned by taxonomists in the 19th century, but has been often used since
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Choripetalae
Choripetalae Eichler (1876), is a descriptive botanical name used in the Eichler and Wettstein systems for a group in the flowering plants. It was one of two groups within the Dicotyledones, the other being the Sympetalae. The latter have fused petals (sympetally) which distinguishes them from the free, unfused petals of the Choripetalae.[1] Thus if the petals are free from one another in the corolla, the plant is polypetalous or choripetalous; while if the petals are at least partially fused together, it is gamopetalous or sympetalous. See also[edit]PetalReferences[edit]^ History of Taxonomy, 1875-1926. Bihrmann's Caudiciforms. Accessed on August 10, 2011.This botany article is a stub
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Superorder
In biological classification, the order (Latin: ordo) isa taxonomic rank used in the classification of organisms and recognized by the nomenclature codes. Other well-known ranks are life, domain, kingdom, phylum, class, family, genus, and species, with order fitting in between class and family. An immediately higher rank, superorder, may be added directly above order, while suborder would be a lower rank. a taxonomic unit, a taxon, in that rank. In that case the plural is orders (Latin ordines).Example: All owls belong to the order Strigiformes.What does and does not belong to each order is determined by a taxonomist, as is whether a particular order should be recognized at all. Often there is no exact agreement, with different taxonomists each taking a different position. There are no hard rules that a taxonomist needs to follow in describing or recognizing an order
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Rolf Dahlgren
Rolf Martin Theodor Dahlgren (7 July 1932 – 14 February 1987) was a Swedish-Danish botanist, professor at the University of Copenhagen from 1973 to his death.Contents1 Life 2 Career 3 Selected publications 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksLife[edit] Dahlgren was born in Örebro
Örebro
on July 7, 1932 to apothecary Rudolf Dahlgren and wife Greta née Dahlstrand.[1] He took his MSc
MSc
degree in Biology in (1955) and PhD
PhD
degree in Botany
Botany
in (1963) at Lund University.[2] He was killed in a car crash in Scania, Sweden
Sweden
on February 14, 1987).[3] Career[edit] He continued working on South African plants during expeditions in 1956-57 and 1965–66, while affiliated with the Botanical Museum in Lund as docent. In 1973, he became professor of botany at the University of Copenhagen
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Order (biology)
In biological classification, the order (Latin: ordo) isa taxonomic rank used in the classification of organisms and recognized by the nomenclature codes. Other well-known ranks are life, domain, kingdom, phylum, class, family, genus, and species, with order fitting in between class and family. An immediately higher rank, superorder, may be added directly above order, while suborder would be a lower rank. a taxonomic unit, a taxon, in that rank. In that case the plural is orders (Latin ordines).Example: All owls belong to the order Strigiformes.What does and does not belong to each order is determined by a taxonomist, as is whether a particular order should be recognized at all. Often there is no exact agreement, with different taxonomists each taking a different position. There are no hard rules that a taxonomist needs to follow in describing or recognizing an order
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Botanical Name
A botanical name is a formal scientific name conforming to the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants
International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants
(ICN) and, if it concerns a plant cultigen, the additional cultivar or Group epithets must conform to the International Code of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants (ICNCP). The code of nomenclature covers "all organisms traditionally treated as algae, fungi, or plants, whether fossil or non-fossil, including blue-green algae (Cyanobacteria), chytrids, oomycetes, slime moulds and photosynthetic protists with their taxonomically related non-photosynthetic groups (but excluding Microsporidia)."[1] The purpose of a formal name is to have a single name that is accepted and used worldwide for a particular plant or plant group
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