HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Poaceae
Gramineae Juss.Blades of grass Poaceae
Poaceae
(Poe-ay-see-ay) or Gramineae (Grammy-nee-ay) is a large and nearly ubiquitous family of monocotyledonous flowering plants known as grasses. Poaceae
Poaceae
includes the cereal grasses, bamboos and the grasses of natural grassland and cultivated lawns and pasture. Grasses have stems that are hollow except at the nodes and narrow alternate leaves borne in two ranks. The lower part of each leaf encloses the stem, forming a leaf-sheath
[...More...]

"Poaceae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Earth
Earth
Earth
is the third planet from the Sun
Sun
and the only object in the Universe
Universe
known to harbor life. According to radiometric dating and other sources of evidence, Earth
Earth
formed over 4.5 billion years ago.[24][25][26] Earth's gravity interacts with other objects in space, especially the Sun
Sun
and the Moon, Earth's only natural satellite. Earth
Earth
revolves around the Sun
Sun
in 365.26 days, a period known as an Earth
Earth
year
[...More...]

"Earth" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
[...More...]

"Taxonomy (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rubiaceae
See textThe Rubiaceae
Rubiaceae
are a family of flowering plants, commonly known as the coffee, madder, or bedstraw family. It consists of terrestrial trees, shrubs, lianas, or herbs that are recognizable by simple, opposite leaves with interpetiolar stipules. The family contains about 13,500 species in 611 genera, which makes it the fourth-largest angiosperm family. Rubiaceae
Rubiaceae
has a cosmopolitan distribution; however, the largest species diversity is concentrated in the (sub)tropics.[1] Economic importance includes Coffea, the source of coffee, Cinchona, the source of the antimalarial alkaloid quinine, some dye plants (e.g. Rubia), and ornamental cultivars (e.g
[...More...]

"Rubiaceae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fabaceae
The Fabaceae
Fabaceae
or Leguminosae,[6] commonly known as the legume, pea, or bean family, is a large and economically important family of flowering plants. It includes trees, shrubs, and perennial or annual herbaceous plants, which are easily recognized by their fruit (legume) and their compound, stipulated leaves. Many legumes have characteristics of flowers and fruits
[...More...]

"Fabaceae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Orchidaceae
The Orchidaceae
Orchidaceae
are a diverse and widespread family of flowering plants, with blooms that are often colourful and fragrant, commonly known as the orchid family. Along with the Asteraceae, they are one of the two largest families of flowering plants. The Orchidaceae
Orchidaceae
have about 28,000 currently accepted species, distributed in about 763 genera.[2][3] The determination of which family is larger is still under debate, because verified data on the members of such enormous families are continually in flux. Regardless, the number of orchid species nearly equals the number of bony fishes and is more than twice the number of bird species, and about four times the number of mammal species
[...More...]

"Orchidaceae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Asteraceae
Asteroideae
Asteroideae
Lindley Barnadesioideae
Barnadesioideae
Bremer & Jansen Carduoideae
Carduoideae
Sweet Cichorioideae
Cichorioideae
Chevallier Corymbioideae
Corymbioideae
Panero & Funk Famatinanthoideae S.E
[...More...]

"Asteraceae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Family (biology)
In biological classification, family (Latin: familia, plural familiae) is one of the eight major taxonomic ranks; it is classified between order and genus. A family may be divided into subfamilies, which are intermediate ranks above the rank of genus. In vernacular usage, a family may be named after one of its common members; for example, walnuts and hickory trees belong to the family Juglandaceae, commonly known as the walnut family. What does or does not belong to a family—or whether a described family should be recognized at all—are proposed and determined by practicing taxonomists. There are no hard rules for describing or recognizing a family, or any taxa. Taxonomists often take different positions about descriptions of taxa, and there may be no broad consensus across the scientific community for some time
[...More...]

"Family (biology)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Juss.
Antoine Laurent de Jussieu
Antoine Laurent de Jussieu
(French pronunciation: ​[ɑ̃twan loʁɑ̃ də ʒysjø]; 12 April 1748 – 17 September 1836) was a French botanist, notable as the first to publish a natural classification of flowering plants; much of his system remains in use today. His classification was based on and extended unpublished work by his uncle, the botanist Bernard de Jussieu.Contents1 Life 2 Selected publications 3 Legacy 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 WikimediaLife[edit] Jussieu was born in Lyon. He went to Paris
Paris
to study medicine, graduating in 1770. He was professor of botany at the Jardin des Plantes from 1770 to 1826. His son Adrien-Henri also became a botanist. In his study of flowering plants, Genera plantarum (1789), Jussieu adopted a methodology based on the use of multiple characters to define groups, an idea derived from naturalist Michel Adanson
[...More...]

"Juss." on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Synonym (taxonomy)
In scientific nomenclature, a synonym is a scientific name that applies to a taxon that (now) goes by a different scientific name,[1] although the term is used somewhat differently in the zoological code of nomenclature.[2] For example, Linnaeus was the first to give a scientific name (under the currently used system of scientific nomenclature) to the Norway spruce, which he called Pinus abies. This name is no longer in use: it is now a synonym of the current scientific name which is Picea abies. Unlike synonyms in other contexts, in taxonomy a synonym is not interchangeable with the name of which it is a synonym. In taxonomy, synonyms are not equals, but have a different status. For any taxon with a particular circumscription, position, and rank, only one scientific name is considered to be the correct one at any given time (this correct name is to be determined by applying the relevant code of nomenclature)
[...More...]

"Synonym (taxonomy)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Early Cretaceous
The Early Cretaceous/Middle Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(geochronological name) or the Lower Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(chronostratigraphic name), is the earlier or lower of the two major divisions of the Cretaceous. It is usually considered to stretch from 146 Ma to 100 Ma. During this time many new types of dinosaurs appeared or came into prominence, including Psittacosaurus, spinosaurids, carcharodontosaurids and coelurosaurs, while survivors from the Late Jurassic
Jurassic
continued. Angiosperms (flowering plants)[2] appear for the first time. Also, Birds appear for the first time. See also[edit]Geology portal Palaeontology portal Time portalGeologic PeriodReferences[edit]^ http://www.stratigraphy.org/index.php/ics-chart-timescale ^ Sun, G., Q. Ji, D.L. Dilcher, S. Zheng, K.C. Nixon & X. Wang 2002. Archaefructaceae, a New Basal Angiosperm
Angiosperm
Family
[...More...]

"Early Cretaceous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

John Hendley Barnhart
John Hendley Barnhart (October 4, 1871 – November 11, 1949) was an American botanist and author, specializing in biographies of botanists.[1]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Final Years 4 Works 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Barnhart was born in Brooklyn, New York to John Wesley Barnhart and Emma Miller Barnhart.[2] He attended Wesleyan University in Middletown, Connecticut, receiving an A.B. in 1892 and an A.M. the following year
[...More...]

"John Hendley Barnhart" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Commelinids
In plant taxonomy, commelinids (originally commelinoids[1][2]) (plural, not capitalised) is a name used by the APG IV system
APG IV system
for a clade within the monocots, which in its turn is a clade within the angiosperms. The commelinids are the only clade that the APG has informally named within the monocots. The remaining monocots are a paraphyletic unit
[...More...]

"Commelinids" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Plant
Plants are mainly multicellular, predominantly photosynthetic eukaryotes of the kingdom Plantae. They form the clade Viridiplantae (Latin for "green plants") that includes the flowering plants, conifers and other gymnosperms, ferns, clubmosses, hornworts, liverworts, mosses and the green algae, and excludes the red and brown algae. Historically, plants were treated as one of two kingdoms including all living things that were not animals, and all algae and fungi were treated as plants. However, all current definitions of Plantae exclude the fungi and some algae, as well as the prokaryotes (the archaea and bacteria). Green plants have cell walls containing cellulose and obtain most of their energy from sunlight via photosynthesis by primary chloroplasts that are derived from endosymbiosis with cyanobacteria. Their chloroplasts contain chlorophylls a and b, which gives them their green color
[...More...]

"Plant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carl Linnaeus
Carl Linnaeus
Linnaeus
(/lɪˈniːəs, lɪˈneɪəs/;[1][2] 23 May[note 1] 1707 – 10 January 1778), also known after his ennoblement as Carl von Linné[3] (Swedish pronunciation: [kɑːɭ fɔn lɪˈneː] ( listen)), was a Swedish botanist, physician and zoologist, who formalised the modern system of naming organisms called binomial nomenclature. He is known by the epithet "father of modern taxonomy".[4] Many of his writings were in Latin
Latin
and his name is rendered in Latin
Latin
as Carolus Linnæus (after 1761 Carolus a Linné). Linnaeus
Linnaeus
was born in the countryside of Småland, in southern Sweden. He received most of his higher education at Uppsala University
Uppsala University
and began giving lectures in botany there in 1730
[...More...]

"Carl Linnaeus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Neogene
The Neogene
Neogene
( /ˈniːəˌdʒiːn/)[6][7] (informally Upper Tertiary or Late Tertiary) is a geologic period and system that spans 20.45 million years from the end of the Paleogene Period 23.03 million years ago (Mya) to the beginning of the present Quaternary
Quaternary
Period 2.58 Mya. The Neogene
Neogene
is sub-divided into two epochs, the earlier Miocene
Miocene
and the later Pliocene. Some geologists assert that the Neogene
Neogene
cannot be clearly delineated from the modern geological period, the Quaternary. During this period, mammals and birds continued to evolve into roughly modern forms, while other groups of life remained relatively unchanged. Early hominids, the ancestors of humans, appeared in Africa near the end of the period
[...More...]

"Neogene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.