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Playwright
A playwright or dramatist (rarely dramaturge) is a person who writes plays.Contents1 Etymology 2 History2.1 Early playwrights 2.2 Aristotle's Poetics techniques 2.3 Neo-classical theory 2.4 Well-made play3 Play formats 4 Contemporary playwrights in America 5 New play development in America 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is not a variant spelling of the common misspelling "playwrite": the word wright is an archaic English term for a craftsman or builder (as in a wheelwright or cartwright). Hence the prefix and the suffix combine to indicate someone who has "wrought" words, themes, and other elements into a dramatic form - someone who crafts plays
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Theatre Communications Group
Theatre Communications Group (TCG) is a non-profit service organization headquartered in New York City that promotes professional non-profit theatre in the United States.[2] The organization also publishes American Theatre magazine and ARTSEARCH, a theatrical employment bulletin,[3] as well as trade editions of theatrical scripts.Contents1 History 2 TCG Books 3 Periodicals 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit]The Goodman Theatre in Chicago, one of the original founding members of TCGTheatre Communications Group was established in 1961 with a grant from the Ford Foundation in response to their then arts and humanities director W
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Ethos
Ethos
Ethos
(/ˈiːθɒs/ or US: /ˈiːθoʊs/) is a Greek word meaning "character" that is used to describe the guiding beliefs or ideals that characterize a community, nation, or ideology. The Greeks also used this word to refer to the power of music to influence emotions, behaviours, and even morals.[1] Early Greek stories of Orpheus
Orpheus
exhibit this idea in a compelling way
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Italian Renaissance
Transition from the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
to the Modern era Renaissance
Renaissance
spreads to the rest of Europe Development of capitalism, banking, merchantilism and accounting: beginning of the European Great Divergence Explorers from the Italian maritime r
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Commedia Dell'arte
Commedia dell'arte
Commedia dell'arte
(Italian pronunciation: [komˈmɛːdja delˈlarte], comedy of the profession[1]) was an early form of professional theatre, originating from Italy, that was popular in Europe from the 16th through the 18th century.[2][3][4] Commedia dell'arte also is known as commedia alla maschera, commedia improvviso, and commedia dell'arte all'improvviso.[5] Commedia is a form of theatre characterized by masked "types" which began in Italy in the 16th century and was responsible for the advent of actresses (Isabella Andreini[6]) and improvised performances based on sketches or scenarios.[7][8] A commedia, such as The Tooth Puller, is both scripted and improvised.[7][9] Characters' entrances and exits are scripted. A special characteristic of commedia dell'arte are the lazzi
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Speed-the-Plow
Speed-the-Plow is a 1988 play by David Mamet
David Mamet
that is a satirical dissection of the American movie business, a theme Mamet would revisit in his later films Wag the Dog
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David Mamet
David Alan Mamet (/ˈmæmɪt/; born November 30, 1947) is an American playwright, film director, screenwriter and author. He won a Pulitzer Prize and received Tony nominations for his plays Glengarry Glen Ross (1984) and Speed-the-Plow (1988). He first gained critical acclaim for a trio of off-Broadway plays in 1976: The Duck Variations, Sexual Perversity in Chicago, and American Buffalo.[2] His play Race opened on Broadway on December 6, 2009, and his play The Penitent previewed off-Broadway on February 8, 2017. Feature films that Mamet both wrote and directed include House of Games (1987), The Spanish Prisoner
The Spanish Prisoner
(1997), The Winslow Boy (1999), Heist (2001), Redbelt
Redbelt
(2008), and Phil Spector
Phil Spector
(2013)
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Interregnum (British Isles)
The "interregnum" in England, Scotland, and Ireland started with the execution of Charles I in January 1649 (September 1651 in Scotland) and ended in May 1660 when his son Charles II was restored to the thrones of the three realms, although he had been already acclaimed king in Scotland since 1650. The precise start and end of the interregnum, as well as the social and political events that occurred during the interregnum, varied in the three kingdoms and the English dominions.Contents1 Prelude 2 England 3 Ireland 4 Scotland 5 See also 6 Notes 7 ReferencesPrelude[edit] After the Second English Civil War
Second English Civil War
the leadership of the New Model Army felt deeply betrayed by the King because they thought that while they had been negotiating in good faith he had duplicitously gone behind their backs in making The Engagement with the Scots and encouraging a new civil war
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Restoration (England)
The Restoration of the English monarchy
English monarchy
took place in the Stuart period. It began in 1660 when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under King Charles II
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Mimesis
Mimesis (/maɪˈmiːsəs/; Ancient Greek: μίμησις (mīmēsis), from μιμεῖσθαι (mīmeisthai), "to imitate", from μῖμος (mimos), "imitator, actor") is a critical and philosophical term that carries a wide range of meanings, which include imitation, representation, mimicry, imitatio, receptivity, nonsensuous similarity, the act of resembling, the act of expression, and the presentation of the self.[1] In ancient Greece, mimesis was an idea that governed the creation of works of art, in particular, with correspondence to the physical world understood as a model for beauty, truth, and the good. Plato contrasted mimesis, or imitation, with diegesis, or narrative
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Tragedy
Tragedy
Tragedy
(from the Greek: τραγῳδία, tragōidia[a]) is a form of drama based on human suffering that invokes an accompanying catharsis or pleasure in audiences.[2][3] While many cultures have developed forms that provoke this paradoxical response, the term tragedy often refers to a specific tradition of drama that has played a unique and important role historically in the self-definition of Western civilisation.[2][4] That tradition has been multiple and discontinuous, yet the term has often been used to invoke a powerful effect of cultural identity and historical continuity—"the Greeks and the Elizabethans, in one cultural form; Hel
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Greek Tragedy
Greek tragedy
Greek tragedy
is a form of theatre from Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
and Asia Minor. It reached its most significant form in Athens
Athens
in the 5th century BC, the works of which are sometimes called Attic tragedy. Greek tragedy is widely believed to be an extension of the ancient rites carried out in honor of Dionysus, and it heavily influenced the theatre of Ancient Rome and the Renaissance. Tragic plots were most often based upon myths from the oral traditions of archaic epics. In tragic theatre, however, these narratives were presented by actors
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Mythology
Mythology
Mythology
refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people[1] or to the study of such myths.[2] A folklore genre, myth is a feature of every culture. Many sources for myths have been proposed, ranging from personification of nature or personification of natural phenomena, to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events to explanations of existing rituals. A culture's collective mythology helps convey belonging, shared and religious experiences, behavioral models, and moral and practical lessons. The study of myth began in ancient history. Rival classes of the Greek myths by Euhemerus, Plato
Plato
and Sallustius were developed by the Neoplatonists
Neoplatonists
and later revived by Renaissance
Renaissance
mythographers
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Melody
A melody (from Greek μελῳδία, melōidía, "singing, chanting"),[1] also tune, voice, or line, is a linear succession of musical tones that the listener perceives as a single entity. In its most literal sense, a melody is a combination of pitch and rhythm, while more figuratively, the term can include successions of other musical elements such as tonal color. It may be considered the foreground to the background accompaniment. A line or part need not be a foreground melody. Melodies often consist of one or more musical phrases or motifs, and are usually repeated throughout a composition in various forms. Melodies may also be described by their melodic motion or the pitches or the intervals between pitches (predominantly conjunct or disjunct or with further restrictions), pitch range, tension and release, continuity and coherence, cadence, and shape.The true goal of music—its proper enterprise—is melody
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Lexis (Aristotle)
In philosophical discourse, lexis (from the Greek: λέξις "word") is a complete group of words in a language, vocabulary, the total set of all words in a language, and all words that have meaning or a function in grammar.Contents1 Lexis according to Plato 2 Lexis according to Aristotle 3 Elements of rhetorical diction according to Aristotle 4 Two forms of lexis 5 ReferencesLexis according to Plato[edit] According to Plato, lexis is the manner of speaking. Plato said that lexis can be divided into mimesis (imitation properly speaking) and diegesis (simple narrative). Gerard Genette states: "Plato's theoretical division, opposing the two pure and heterogeneous modes of narrative and imitation, within poetic diction, elicits and establishes a practical classification of genres, which includes the two distinct modes...and a mixed mode, for example the Iliad".[1] In the Iliad, a Greek epic written by Homer, the mixed mode is very prevalent
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Dianoia
Dianoia (Greek: διάνοια, ratio in Latin) is a term used by Plato for a type of thinking, specifically about mathematical and technical subjects. It is the capacity for, process of, or result of discursive thinking, in contrast with the immediate apprehension that is characteristic of noesis
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