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Pierre Caroli
Pierre Caroli (born 1480 in Rozay-en-Brie, died in 1550, possibly in Rome) was a French refugee and religious figure.[1] He was a Doctor of theology of the University of Paris, and was receptive to the ideas of the Protestant Reformation. However, he entered into open confrontation with John Calvin, the central figure of French Protestantism. In a theological dispute, Caroli accused Calvin and Guillaume Farel
Guillaume Farel
of Arianism
Arianism
and Sabellianism. Caroli was a teacher of theology in Paris
Paris
in 1520. There he had been under the influence of a leader of the humanists, Jacques Faber Stapulensis (Lefèvre d'Etaples), and belonged to the group supporting the return of the bishop Guillaume Briçonnet de Meaux. He was professor in the Sorbonne for some years
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Rozay-en-Brie
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.Rozay-en-Brie is a commune in the Seine-et-Marne department in the Île-de-France region in north-central France.Contents1 Demographics 2 Population 3 Notable people 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDemographics[edit] Inhabitants of Rozay-en-Brie are called Rozéens. Population[edit]Date of Population1793 1800 1806 1820 1821 1831 1836 1841 1846 18511 600 1 450 1 370 - 1 417 1 383 1 456 1 513 1 420 1 5021856 1861 1866 1872 1876 1881 1886 1891 18961 417 - 1 568 1 548 1 593 1 569 1 531 1 368 1 3901901 1906 1911 1921 1926 1931 1936 1946 19541 354 1 406 1 246 1 079 1 108 1 120 1 127 1 214 1 3381962 1968 1975 1982 1990 1999 2004 2007 2012<
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Geneva
Geneva
Geneva
(/dʒɪˈniːvə/, French: Genève [ʒənɛv], Arpitan: Genèva [dzəˈnɛva], German: Genf [ɡɛnf], Italian: Ginevra [dʒiˈneːvra], Romansh: Genevra) is the second-most populous city in Switzerland
Switzerland
(after Zürich) and is the most populous city of the Romandy, the French-speaking part of Switzerland
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Swiss People
The Swiss (German: die Schweizer, French: les Suisses, Italian: gli Svizzeri, Romansh: ils Svizzers) are citizens of Switzerland.[e] The demonym derives from the toponym of Schwyz
Schwyz
and has been in widespread use to refer to the Old Swiss Confederacy
Old Swiss Confederacy
since the 16th century.[6] Although the Swiss Confederation, the modern state of Switzerland, originated in 1848, the period of romantic nationalism, it is not a nation-state, and the Swiss are not usually considered to form a single ethnic group, but a confederacy (Eidgenossenschaft) or Willensnation ("nation of will", "nation by choice", that is, a consociational state), a term coined in conscious contrast to "nation" in the conventionally linguistic or ethnic sense of the term
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Neuenberg
Neuchâtel
Neuchâtel
(French pronunciation: ​[nøʃatɛl]), or Neuchatel; (Old French: neu(f) "new" and chatel "castle" (French: château); German: Neuenburg; Italian: Neuchâtel; Romansh: Neuchâtel
Neuchâtel
or Neufchâtel)[notes 1] is a town, a municipality, and the capital of the Swiss canton of Neuchâtel
Neuchâtel
on Lake Neuchâtel. The city has approximately 34,000 inhabitants (80,000 in the metropolitan area).[3] The city is sometimes referred to historically by the German name  Neuenburg (help·info), which has the same meaning
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Montpellier
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Montpellier
Montpellier
(pronounced [mɔ̃pəlje, -pɛ-] ( listen);[1][2] Occitan: Montpelhièr [mumpeˈʎɛ]) is a city in southern France. It is the capital of the Hérault department. Montpellier
Montpellier
is the 7th-largest city of France, and is also the fastest-growing city in the country over the past 25 years. In 2014, 589,610 people live in the urban area and 275,318 in the city itself
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Pastor
A pastor (UK: /ˈpɑːstə/; US: /ˈpæstər/) is an ordained leader of a Christian
Christian
congregation
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Bern
The city of Bern
Bern
(German: [bɛrn] ( listen)) or Berne (French: [bɛʁn]; Italian: Berna [ˈbɛrna]; Romansh: Berna  [ˈbɛrnɐ]; Bernese German: Bärn [b̥æːrn]) is the de facto capital of Switzerland, referred to by the Swiss as their (e.g
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Lausanne
Lausanne
Lausanne
(/loʊˈzæn/, French pronunciation: ​[lozan], German: Lausanne, and also Lausannen[3] Italian: Losanna, Romansh: Losanna)[4] is a city in the French-speaking part of Switzerland, and the capital and biggest city of the canton of Vaud. The city is situated on the shores of Lake Geneva
Lake Geneva
(French: Lac Léman, or simply Le Léman).[5] It faces the French town of Évian-les-Bains, with the Jura Mountains
Jura Mountains
to its north-west
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Oswald Myconius
Oswald Myconius
Oswald Myconius
(1488, Lucerne
Lucerne
– 14 October 1552, Basel) was Swiss Protestant theologian. He was a follower of Huldrych Zwingli.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 Further readingLife[edit] He was born at Lucerne, Switzerland. His family name was Geisshüsler, and his father was a miller; hence he was also called Molitoris (Latin molitor, "miller"). The name Myconius is said to have been given him by Erasmus; it alludes to the proverbial expression bald-headed Myconian. From the school at Lucerne
Lucerne
he went to the University of Basel
Basel
to study classics. From 1514 he obtained teaching posts at Basel, where he married, and made the acquaintance of Erasmus
Erasmus
and of Hans Holbein, the painter. In 1516 he was called, as schoolmaster, to Zürich, where (1518) he attached himself to the reforming party of Zwingli
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Simon Grynaeus
Simon Grynaeus (born Simon Griner; 1493 – 1 August 1541) was a German scholar and theologian of the Protestant Reformation.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Grynaeus was the son of Jacob Gryner, a Swabian peasant, and was born at Veringendorf, in Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen. He adopted the name "Grynaeus" from the epithet of Apollo
Apollo
in Virgil. He was a schoolmate of Melanchthon at Pforzheim, whence he went to the University of Vienna, distinguishing himself there as a Latinist and Hellenist. His appointment as rector of a school at Buda
Buda
was of no long continuance: his views excited the zeal of the Dominicans, and he was thrown into prison
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Hebrew
Hebrew (/ˈhiːbruː/; עִבְרִית, Ivrit [ʔivˈʁit] ( listen) or [ʕivˈɾit] ( listen)) is a Northwest Semitic language native to Israel, spoken by over 9 million people worldwide.[8][9] Historically, it is regarded as the language of the Israelites
Israelites
and their ancestors, although the language was not referred to by the name Hebrew in the Tanakh.[note 1] The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date from the 10th century BCE.[10] Hebrew belongs to the West Semitic branch of the Afroasiatic language family
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Basel
Basel
Basel
(/ˈbɑːzəl/; also Basle /bɑːl/; German: Basel
Basel
[ˈbaːzl̩]; French: Bâle [bɑːl]; Italian: Basilea [baziˈlɛːa]) is a city in northwestern Switzerland
Switzerland
on the river Rhine. Basel
Basel
is Switzerland's third-most-populous city (after Zürich
Zürich
and Geneva) with about 175,000 inhabitants.[3] Located where the Swiss, French and German borders meet, Basel
Basel
also has suburbs in France
France
and Germany
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Alençon
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Alençon
Alençon
(French pronunciation: [a.lɑ̃.sɔ̃] ( listen)) is a commune in Normandy, France, capital of the Orne
Orne
department. It is situated 173 kilometres (107 mi) west of Paris
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