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Pictones
The Pictones
Pictones
were a tribe inhabiting a region along the Bay of Biscay in what is now western France, along the south bank of the Loire.[1] During the reign of Augustus
Augustus
(27 BC – 14 AD), the Pictones
Pictones
were included in the larger province of Gallia Aquitania, along with most of western Gaul. They gave their name to the Roman appellation of Poitiers
Poitiers
- Limonum Pictonum / Pictavi,[2] as well as to the modern region of Poitou.Contents1 Prior to Roman rule 2 During and after Roman rule 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesPrior to Roman rule[edit] Pictones
Pictones
coin depicting warrior 1st century BC.The Pictones
Pictones
minted coins from the end of the 2nd century BC. The tribe was first noted in written sources when encountered by Julius Caesar
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Roman Aqueducts
The Romans constructed aqueducts throughout the Empire to bring water into cities and towns—often from distant sources. The water supplied public baths, latrines, fountains, and private households. Aqueducts also provided water for mining operations, milling, farms, and gardens. Aqueducts moved water through gravity alone, usually along a slight overall downward gradient within conduits of stone, brick, or concrete, but sometimes through steeper gradients. Most conduits were buried beneath the ground and followed the contours of the terrain; obstructing peaks were circumvented or, less often, tunneled through. Where valleys or lowlands intervened, the conduit was carried on bridgework, or its contents fed into high-pressure lead, ceramic, or stone pipes and siphoned across. Most aqueduct systems included sedimentation tanks, which helped reduce any water-borne debris. Sluices and castella aquae (distribution tanks) regulated the supply to individual destinations
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Catalauni
The Catalauni were a tribe of Belgic Gaul. Etymologically, their name is not connected to the British Catuvellauni
Catuvellauni
so there is no basis to make an equation between the two
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Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
Gallia Belgica
("Belgic Gaul") was a province of the Roman empire located in the north-eastern part of Roman Gaul, in what is today primarily Belgium, Luxembourg
Luxembourg
and the Netherlands. In 50 BC after the conquest by Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
during his Gallic Wars, it became one of the three main provinces of Gaul
Gaul
(known as the Tres Galliae, the other two being Gallia Aquitania
Gallia Aquitania
and Gallia Lugdunensis).[1] An official Roman province
Roman province
was later created by emperor Augustus
Augustus
in 22 BC. The province was named for the Belgae, as the largest tribal confederation in the area, but also included the territories of the Treveri, Mediomatrici, Leuci, Sequani, Helvetii
Helvetii
and others
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Elizabeth Rawson
Elizabeth Donata Rawson (13 April 1934[1] – 10 December 1988[2]) was a classical scholar known primarily for her work in the intellectual history of the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and her biography of Cicero.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 Scholarship 4 Works4.1 Books 4.2 Selected essays 4.3 Reference works5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Elizabeth Rawson was the daughter of Graham Stanhope Rawson and Ivy Marion née Enthoven, who married in 1930. The Rawsons were originally a Yorkshire
Yorkshire
family whose lineage can be traced back to around 1500, but Elizabeth's great-great-grandfather had settled in Kent
Kent
in the early 19th century. The family lived at 8 Campden Hill Square, Kensington. Rawson grew up in an environment where classical music, theatre, and intellectual achievement were highly valued
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Bay Of Biscay
Coordinates: 45°30′N 04°20′W / 45.500°N 4.333°W / 45.500; -4.333The Bay
Bay
of Biscay
Biscay
(/ˈbɪskeɪ, -ki/; French: Golfe de Gascogne, Spanish: Golfo de Vizcaya, Breton: Pleg-mor Gwaskogn, Basque: Bizkaiko Golkoa) is a gulf of the northeast Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
located south of the Celtic Sea
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Commentarii De Bello Gallico
Commentāriī dē Bellō Gallicō (English: Commentaries on the Gallic War), also Bellum Gallicum (English: Gallic War), is Julius Caesar's firsthand account of the Gallic Wars, written as a third-person narrative
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Roman Republic
The Roman Republic
Republic
(Latin: Res publica Romana; Classical Latin: [ˈreːs ˈpuːb.lɪ.ka roːˈmaː.na]) was the era of classical Roman civilization beginning with the overthrow of the Roman Kingdom, traditionally dated to 509 BC, and ending in 27 BC with the establishment of the Roman Empire. It was during this period that Rome's control expanded from the city's immediate surroundings to hegemony over the entire Mediterranean
Mediterranean
world. Roman government was headed by two consuls, elected annually by the citizens and advised by a senate composed of appointed magistrates. As Roman society was very hierarchical by modern standards, the evolution of the Roman government was heavily influenced by the struggle between the patricians, Rome's land-holding aristocracy, who traced their ancestry to the founding of Rome, and the plebeians, the far more numerous citizen-commoners
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Poitevin (language)
Poitevin (Poetevin) is a language spoken in Poitou, France. It is one of the regional languages of France
France
and is not as commonly spoken as it once was, as the standard form of French now predominates. Poitevin is now classified as one of the langues d'oïl but is distinguished by certain features of the langue d'oc. The language is spoken on what was the border between the two language families of oïl and oc (placenames in the region clearly show historical settlement of oc speakers). The langue d’oïl subsequently spread south, absorbing oc features. Poitevin is also widely referred to as parlanjhe (the language). François Rabelais
François Rabelais
wrote that he learned this dialect, along with many other languages and dialects, since he was educated in Fontenay-le-Comte
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Roman Britain
Roman Britain
Roman Britain
(Latin: Britannia
Britannia
or, later, Britanniae, "the Britains") was the area of the island of Great Britain
Great Britain
that was governed by the Roman Empire, from 43 to 410 AD.[1]:129–131[2]
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British Isles
The British Isles
British Isles
are a group of islands off the north-western coast of continental Europe
Europe
that consist of the islands of Great Britain, Ireland
Ireland
and over six thousand smaller isles.[7] Situated in the North Atlantic, the islands have a total area of approximately 315,159 km2,[5] and a combined population of just under 70 million. Two sovereign states are located on the islands: the Republic of Ireland
Ireland
(which covers roughly five-sixths of the island of Ireland)[8] and the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
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Christianity
Christianity[note 1] is an Abrahamic monotheistic[1] religion based on the life, teachings, and miracles of Jesus
Jesus
of Nazareth, known by Christians
Christians
as the Christ, or "Messiah", who is the focal point of the Christian
Christian
faiths
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Gallia Narbonensis
Gallia Narbonensis
Gallia Narbonensis
( Latin
Latin
for " Gaul
Gaul
of Narbonne", from its chief settlement)[n 1] was a Roman province
Roman province
located in what is now Languedoc and Provence, in southern France. It was also known as Provincia Nostra ("Our Province"), from its having been the first Roman province
Roman province
north of the Alps, and as Gallia Transalpina ("Transalpine Gaul"), distinguishing it from Cisalpine Gaul
Cisalpine Gaul
in northern Italy. It became a Roman province
Roman province
in the late 2nd century BC. Its boundaries were roughly defined by the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
to the south and the Cévennes
Cévennes
and Alps
Alps
to the north and west
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