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Peter Oluf Brøndsted
Peter Oluf Brøndsted
Peter Oluf Brøndsted
(17 November 1780 – 26 June 1842), Danish archaeologist and traveller. Biography[edit] Brøndsted was born at Fruering in Jutland. After studying at the University of Copenhagen
University of Copenhagen
(initially majoring in theology but moving to philology from 1802 onwards) he visited Paris in 1806 with his friend Georg Koës. After remaining there two years, they went together to Italy. Both were zealously attached to the study of antiquities and the tastes and interests they held in common led them, in 1810, to join an expedition to Greece
Greece
with Otto Magnus von Stackelberg, Carl Haller von Hallerstein, the German painter Jakob Linckh, and the then Austrian consul in Greece
Greece
George Christian Gropius. Unexpectedly, the following year, Koës died on Zante
Zante
at the age of 29 of pneumonia
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Christian Albrecht Jensen
Christian Albrecht Jensen
Christian Albrecht Jensen
(26 June 1792 – 13 July 1870) was a Danish portrait painter who was active during the Golden Age of Danish Painting in the first half of the 19th century. Painting more than 400 portraits over the course of his career, he depicted most of the leading figures of the Danish Golden Age, including the writer Hans Christian Andersen, the painter Christoffer Wilhelm Eckersberg, the sculptor Bertel Thorvaldsen, the physicist Hans Christian Ørsted
Hans Christian Ørsted
and the theologian N. F. S. Grundtvig. Although Jensen experienced considerable commercial success, he received little official appreciation from the artistic establishment of his day
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Elgin Marbles
The Elgin Marbles
Elgin Marbles
(/ˈel gin/), also known pars pro toto ("a part taken for the whole") as the Parthenon
Parthenon
Marbles, are a collection of Classical Greek marble sculptures made under the supervision of the architect and sculptor Phidias
Phidias
and his assistants. They were originally part of the temple of the Parthenon
Parthenon
and other buildings on the Acropolis
Acropolis
of Athens.[1][2] In 1801, Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin
Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin
obtained a firman, which was an official decree,[3] from the Sublime Porte, the central government of the Ottoman Empire
Ottoman Empire
which were then the rulers of Greece. Elgin was also later approved by a second firman which allowed for the shipping of the marbles from the Piraeus
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British Museum
5,906,716 (2017)[2]Ranked 1st nationallyChairman Sir Richard LambertDirector Hartwig FischerPublic transit access Goodge Street; Holborn; Tottenham Court Road; Russell Square;Website britishmuseum.orgArea 807,000 sq ft (75,000 m2) in 94 GalleriesThe centre of the museum was redeveloped in 2001 to become the Great Court, surrounding the original Reading Room.The British Museum, located in the Bloomsbury
Bloomsbury
area of London, United Kingdom, is a public institution dedicated to human history, art and culture
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CEOs
Kea (Greek: Κέα), also known as or Tzia (Greek: Τζια) and in antiquity Keos (Greek: Κέως, Latin: Ceos), is a Greek island in the Cyclades
Cyclades
archipelago in the Aegean Sea. Kea is part of the Kea-Kythnos
Kea-Kythnos
regional unit.Contents1 Geography1.1 Local Communities2 History 3 Ecclesiastical History3.1 Orthodox Eparchy 3.2 Latin Catholic residential diocese4 Historical population 5 Scuba diving 6 Notable people 7 In literature 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksGeography[edit] It is the island of the Cyclades
Cyclades
complex that is closest to Attica (about 1 hour by ferry from Lavrio) and is also 20 km (12 mi) from Cape Sounio as well as 60 km (37 mi) SE of Athens. Its climate is arid, and its terrain is hilly. Kea is 19 km (12 mi) long from north to south and 9 km (6 mi) wide from west to east
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Metope (architecture)
In classical architecture, a metope (μετόπη) is a rectangular architectural element that fills the space between two triglyphs in a Doric frieze, which is a decorative band of alternating triglyphs and metopes above the architrave of a building of the Doric order. Metopes often had painted or sculptural decoration; the most famous example are the 92 metopes of the Parthenon marbles
Parthenon marbles
some of which depict the battle between the Centaurs and the Lapiths. The painting on most metopes has been lost, but sufficient traces remain to allow a close idea of their original appearance. In terms of structure, metopes may be carved from a single block with a triglyph (or triglyphs), or they may be cut separately and slide into slots in the triglyph blocks as at the Temple of Aphaea. Sometimes the metopes and friezes were cut from different stone, so as to provide color contrast
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Parthenon
Coordinates: 37°58′17″N 23°43′35″E / 37.9714°N 23.7265°E / 37.9714; 23.7265ParthenonΠαρθενώναςThe ParthenonGeneral informationType TempleArchitectural style ClassicalLocation Athens, GreeceConstruction started 447 BC[1][2]Completed 432 BC[1][2]Destroyed Partially on 26 September 1687Height 13.72 m (45.0 ft)[3]DimensionsOther dimensions Cella: 29.8 by 19.2 m (98 by 63 ft)Technical detailsSize 69.5 by 30.9 m (228 by 101 ft)Design and constructionArchitect Iktinos, CallicratesOther designers Phidias
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5]
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Hans Christian Ørsted
Hans Christian Ørsted
Hans Christian Ørsted
(/ˈɜːrstɛd/;[2] Danish: [hans kʁæsdjan ˈɶɐ̯sdɛð]; often rendered Oersted
Oersted
in English; 14 August 1777 – 9 March 1851) was a Danish physicist and chemist who discovered that electric currents create magnetic fields, which was the first connection found between electricity and magnetism. He is still known today for Oersted's Law
Oersted's Law
and the oersted (Oe), the cgs unit of magnetic H-field strength, is named after him. He shaped post-Kantian philosophy and advances in science throughout the late 19th century.[3] In 1824, Ørsted founded Selskabet for Naturlærens Udbredelse (SNU), a society to disseminate knowledge of the natural sciences. He was also the founder of predecessor organizations which eventually became the Danish Meteorological Institute and the Danish Patent and Trademark Office
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Sicily
Sicily
Sicily
(/ˈsɪsɪli/ SISS-i-lee; Italian: Sicilia [siˈtʃiːlja], Sicilian: Sicìlia) is the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea. It is an autonomous region of Italy, in Southern Italy
Italy
along with surrounding minor islands, officially referred to as Regione Siciliana. Sicily
Sicily
is located in the central Mediterranean Sea, south of the Italian Peninsula, from which it is separated by the narrow Strait of Messina. Its most prominent landmark is Mount Etna, the tallest active volcano in Europe,[4] and one of the most active in the world, currently 3,329 m (10,922 ft) high
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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LIBRIS
LIBRIS (Library Information System) is a Swedish national union catalogue maintained by the National Library of Sweden
Sweden
in Stockholm.[1] It is possible to freely search about 6.5 million titles nationwide.[2] In addition to bibliographic records, one for each book or publication, LIBRIS also contains an authority file of people
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Système Universitaire De Documentation
The système universitaire de documentation or SUDOC is a system used by the libraries of French universities and higher education establishments to identify, track and manage the documents in their possession. The catalog, which contains more than 10 million references, allows students and researcher to search for bibliographical and location information in over 3,400 documentation centers. It is maintained by the Bibliographic Agency for Higher Education (fr) (ABES). External links[edit]Official websiteThis article relating to library science or information science is a stub
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