HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

picture info

Parnassiaceae
Parnassiaceae
Parnassiaceae
Gray are a family of flowering plants in the eudicot order Celastrales.[1] It is not recognized in the APG III system of plant classification.[2] When that system was published in 2009, Parnassiaceae
Parnassiaceae
were treated as a segregate of an expanded Celastraceae.[3] Parnassiaceae
Parnassiaceae
have only two genera, Lepuropetalon and Parnassia.[4] Lepuropetalon has only one species, Lepuropetalon spathulatum, a winter annual that usually prefers sandy soil
[...More...]

"Parnassiaceae" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Samuel Frederick Gray
Samuel Frederick Gray
Samuel Frederick Gray
(10 December 1766 – 12 April 1828) was a British botanist, mycologist, and pharmacologist. He was the father of the zoologists John Edward Gray
John Edward Gray
and George Robert Gray.Contents1 Background 2 Medical writings 3 The Natural Arrangement of British Plants 4 Bibliography 5 ReferencesBackground[edit] He was the son of Samuel Gray, a London seedsman. He received no inheritance and, after failing to qualify for medicine, turned to medical and botanical writing. He married Elizabeth Forfeit in 1794 and moved to Walsall, Staffordshire, where he established an assay office before he moved back to London in 1800. He set up an apothecary business in Wapping, which failed within a few years. Then, he seems to have maintained himself by writing and lecturing.[1] Medical writings[edit] Gray wrote a Supplement to the Pharmacopoeia, published in 1818 with several subsequent editions
[...More...]

"Samuel Frederick Gray" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Tannin
A tannin (or tannoid) is an astringent, polyphenolic biomolecule that binds to and precipitates proteins and various other organic compounds including amino acids and alkaloids. The term tannin (from tanna, an Old High German
Old High German
word for oak or fir tree, as in Tannenbaum) refers to the use of wood tannins from oak in tanning animal hides into leather; hence the words "tan" and "tanning" for the treatment of leather
[...More...]

"Tannin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Biodiversity
Biodiversity
Biodiversity
refers to the variety and variability of life on Earth. Biodiversity
Biodiversity
is typically a measure of variation at the genetic, species, and ecosystem level.[1] Terrestrial biodiversity is usually greater near the equator,[2] which is the result of the warm climate and high primary productivity.[3] Biodiversity
Biodiversity
is not distributed evenly on Earth, and is richest in the tropics. These tropical forest ecosystems cover less than 10 percent of earth's surface, and contain about 90 percent of the world's species.[4] Marine biodiversity is usually highest along coasts in the Western Pacific, where sea surface temperature is highest, and in the mid-latitudinal band in all oceans
[...More...]

"Biodiversity" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

North America
North America
North America
is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas.[3][4] It is bordered to the north by the Arctic
Arctic
Ocean, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
[...More...]

"North America" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Parnassia Palustris
Parnassia
Parnassia
palustris, commonly called marsh grass of Parnassus, northern grass-of-Parnassus, or just grass-of-Parnassus,[1] and bog-star, is a species of the genus Parnassia.[2] It is the county flower of Cumbria
Cumbria
and Sutherland
Sutherland
in the United Kingdom, and appears on the county arms of the former county.[3] The name comes from ancient Greece: evidently the cattle on Mount Parnassus appreciated the plant; hence it was an "honorary grass".[4] The species epithet palustris is Latin for "of the marsh" and indicates its common habitat.[5] It was described by the Greek physician Dioscorides, growing up a mountain in 1st century A.D.[6]Contents1 Description 2 Range and distribution 3 Uses 4 References 5 External linksDescription[edit] It is not a grass, nor does it look like one, but grows from a short underground stem
[...More...]

"Parnassia Palustris" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Eurasia
Eurasia
Eurasia
/jʊəˈreɪʒə/ is a combined continental landmass of Europe and Asia.[3][4][5] The term is a portmanteau of its constituent continents ( Europe
Europe
and Asia)
[...More...]

"Eurasia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Canada
Coordinates: 60°N 95°W / 60°N 95°W / 60; -95Canada Flag Coat of arms Motto: A Mari Usque Ad Mare  (Latin)"From Sea to Sea"Anthem: "O Canada" Royal anthem: "God Save the Queen"[1]CapitalOttawa45°24′N 75°40′W / 45.400°N 75.667°W / 45.400; -75.667Largest cityTorontoOfficial languagesEnglishFrenchEthnic groups (2016)[2] List of ethnicities 74.3% European 14.5% Asian 5.1% Indigenous 3.4% Caribbean and Latin American 2.9% African 0.2% Oceanian Religion (2011)[3] List of religions 67.2% Christianity
[...More...]

"Canada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Gardening
Gardening
Gardening
is the practice of growing and cultivating plants as part of horticulture. In gardens, ornamental plants are often grown for their flowers, foliage, or overall appearance; useful plants, such as root vegetables, leaf vegetables, fruits, and herbs, are grown for consumption, for use as dyes, or for medicinal or cosmetic use. Gardening
Gardening
is considered by many people to be a relaxing activity. Gardening
Gardening
ranges in scale from fruit orchards, to long boulevard plantings with one or more different types of shrubs, trees, and herbaceous plants, to residential yards including lawns and foundation plantings, to plants in large or small containers grown inside or outside. Gardening
Gardening
may be very specialized, with only one type of plant grown, or involve a large number of different plants in mixed plantings
[...More...]

"Gardening" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Ornamental Plant
Ornamental plants are plants that are grown for decorative purposes in gardens and landscape design projects, as houseplants, for cut flowers and specimen display. The cultivation of these, called floriculture, forms a major branch of horticulture.Contents1 Garden
Garden
plants 2 Trees 3 Grasses 4 Cultivation 5 The term 6 References 7 External links Garden
Garden
plants[edit] Commonly, ornamental [garden] plants are grown for the display of aesthetic features including: flowers, leaves, scent, overall foliage texture, fruit, stem and bark, and aesthetic form. In some cases, unusual features may be considered to be of interest, such as the prominent thorns of Rosa sericea
Rosa sericea
and cacti
[...More...]

"Ornamental Plant" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Rhizomatous
In botany and dendrology, a rhizome (/ˈraɪzoʊm/, from Ancient Greek: rhízōma "mass of roots",[1] from rhizóō "cause to strike root")[2] is a modified subterranean stem of a plant that sends out roots and shoots from its nodes. Rhizomes are also called creeping rootstalks and rootstocks. Rhizomes develop from axillary buds and grow horizontally. The rhizome also retains the ability to allow new shoots to grow upwards.[3] If a rhizome is separated each piece may be able to give rise to a new plant. The plant uses the rhizome to store starches, proteins, and other nutrients. These nutrients become useful for the plant when new shoots must be formed or when the plant dies back for the winter.[3] This is a process known as vegetative reproduction and is used by farmers and gardeners to propagate certain plants. This also allows for lateral spread of grasses like bamboo and bunch grasses
[...More...]

"Rhizomatous" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vascular Bundle
A vascular bundle is a part of the transport system in vascular plants. The transport itself happens in vascular tissue, which exists in two forms: xylem and phloem. Both these tissues are present in a vascular bundle, which in addition will include supporting and protective tissues. The xylem typically lies adaxial with phloem positioned abaxial. In a stem or root this means that the xylem is closer to the centre of the stem or root while the phloem is closer to the exterior. In a leaf, the adaxial surface of the leaf will usually be the upper side, with the abaxial surface the lower side
[...More...]

"Vascular Bundle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Epidermis (botany)
The epidermis (from the Greek ἐπιδερμίς, meaning "over-skin") is a single layer of cells that covers the leaves, flowers, roots and stems of plants. It forms a boundary between the plant and the external environment. The epidermis serves several functions: it protects against water loss, regulates gas exchange, secretes metabolic compounds, and (especially in roots) absorbs water and mineral nutrients
[...More...]

"Epidermis (botany)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Stipule
In botany, stipule ( Latin
Latin
stipula: straw, stalk) is a term coined by Linnaeus[1] which refers to outgrowths borne on either side (sometimes just one side) of the base of a leafstalk (the petiole). A pair of stipules is considered part of the anatomy of the leaf of a typical flowering plant, although in many species the stipules are inconspicuous or entirely absent (and the leaf is then termed exstipulate)
[...More...]

"Stipule" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Temperate Zone
In geography, the temperate or tepid climates of Earth
Earth
occur in the middle latitudes, which span between the tropics and the polar regions.[1] These zones generally have wider temperature ranges throughout the year and more distinct seasonal changes compared to tropical climates, where such variations are often small. In the Koppen climate classification, a climate is termed "temperate" when the coldest month has a mean temperature above -3 C (26.6 F) but below 18 C (64.4 F)
[...More...]

"Temperate Zone" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Leaf Shape
The following is a defined list of terms which are used to describe leaf morphology in the description and taxonomy of plants. Leaves may be simple (a single leaf blade or lamina) or compound (with several leaflets). The edge of the leaf may be regular or irregular, may be smooth or bearing hair, bristles or spines. For more terms describing other aspects of leaves besides their overall morphology see the leaf article.Chart illustrating leaf morphology termsContents1 Leaf
Leaf
structure 2 Leaf
Leaf
and leaflet shapes 3 Edge 4 Leaf
Leaf
folding 5 Latin descriptions 6 See also 7 References 8 Bibliography 9 External links Leaf
Leaf
structure[edit]A ternate compound leaf with a petiole but no rachis (or rachillae)Leaves of most plants include a flat structure called the blade or lamina, but not all leaves are flat, some are cylindrical
[...More...]

"Leaf Shape" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.