HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Offa's Dyke
Coordinates: 52°20′38″N 3°02′56″W / 52.344°N 3.049°W / 52.344; -3.049 Offa's Dyke
Offa's Dyke
(Welsh: Clawdd Offa) is a large linear earthwork that roughly follows the current border between England
England
and Wales. The structure is named after Offa, the Anglo-Saxon king of Mercia
Mercia
from AD 757 until 796, who is traditionally believed to have ordered its construction. Although its precise original purpose is debated, it delineated the border between Anglian Mercia
Mercia
and the Welsh kingdom of Powys. The Dyke, which was up to 65 feet (20 m) wide (including its flanking ditch) and 8 feet (2.4 m) high, traversed low ground, hills and rivers. Today the earthwork is protected as a scheduled monument
[...More...]

"Offa's Dyke" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Eutropius (historian)
Flavius Eutropius was an Ancient Roman
Ancient Roman
historian who flourished in the latter half of the 4th century AD. Eutropius held the office of secretary (magister memoriae) at Constantinople, accompanied the Emperor Julian (361–363) on his expedition against the Persians (363), and was alive during the reign of Valens
Valens
(364–378), to whom he dedicates his Breviarium historiae Romanae and where his history ends.[1] Possibly he held higher state offices in later years, becoming Praetorian prefect
Praetorian prefect
for Illyria in 380 and - together with emperor Valentinian II
Valentinian II
- consul in 387
[...More...]

"Eutropius (historian)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Anglo-Saxons
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
[...More...]

"Anglo-Saxons" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Vassal
A vassal[1] is a person regarded as having a mutual obligation to a lord or monarch, in the context of the feudal system in medieval Europe. The obligations often included military support and mutual protection, in exchange for certain privileges, usually including land held as a tenant or fief.[2] The term is applied to similar arrangements in other feudal societies. In contrast, fealty (fidelitas) was sworn, unconditional loyalty to a monarch.[3]Contents1 Western vassalage 2 Difference between "vassal" and "vassal state" 3 Feudal
Feudal
Japanese equivalents 4 See also4.1 Similar terms5 Notes 6 References 7 External linksWestern vassalage[edit] In fully developed vassalage, the lord and the vassal would take part in a commendation ceremony composed of two parts, the homage and the fealty, including the use of Christian sacraments to show its sacred importance
[...More...]

"Vassal" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Presteigne
Presteigne
Presteigne
(/prɛsˈtiːn/; Welsh: Llanandras (the church of St. Andrew)) is a town and community in Powys, Wales. It was the county town of the historic county of Radnorshire. Despite lying on a minor B road the town has, in common with several other towns close to the Wales-England border, assumed the motto, "Gateway to Wales". The town sits on the south bank of the River Lugg, which forms the England– Wales
Wales
border as it passes the town — the border effectively wraps around three sides of the town (north, east and south). Nearby towns are Kington to the south and Knighton to the north, and surrounding villages include Norton and Stapleton
[...More...]

"Presteigne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Asser
Asser
Asser
(died c. 909) was a Welsh monk from St David's, Dyfed, who became Bishop of Sherborne in the 890s. About 885 he was asked by Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
to leave St David's
St David's
and join the circle of learned men whom Alfred was recruiting for his court. After spending a year at Caerwent
Caerwent
because of illness, Asser
Asser
accepted. In 893 Asser
Asser
wrote a biography of Alfred, called the Life of King Alfred. The manuscript survived to modern times in only one copy, which was part of the Cotton library. That copy was destroyed in a fire in 1731, but transcriptions that had been made earlier, together with material from Asser's work which was included by other early writers, have enabled the work to be reconstructed
[...More...]

"Asser" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

River Dee, Wales
The River Dee (Welsh: Afon Dyfrdwy, Latin: Deva Fluvius) is a river in the United Kingdom. It flows through parts of both Wales
Wales
and England, forming part of the border between the two countries. The river rises in Snowdonia, Wales, flows east via Chester, England, and discharges to the sea in an estuary between Wales
Wales
and the Wirral Peninsula in England
[...More...]

"River Dee, Wales" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Estuary
An estuary is a partially enclosed coastal body of brackish water with one or more rivers or streams flowing into it, and with a free connection to the open sea.[1] Estuaries form a transition zone between river environments and maritime environments. They are subject both to marine influences—such as tides, waves, and the influx of saline water—and to riverine influences—such as flows of fresh water and sediment. The mixing of sea water and fresh water provide high levels of nutrients both in the water column and in sediment, making estuaries among the most productive natural habitats in the world.[2] Most existing estuaries formed during the Holocene
Holocene
epoch with the flooding of river-eroded or glacially scoured valleys when the sea level began to rise about 10,000–12,000 years ago.[3] Estuaries are typically classified according to their geomorphological features or to water-circulation patterns
[...More...]

"Estuary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

River Wye
The River Wye
River Wye
(Welsh: Afon Gwy) is the fifth-longest river in the UK, stretching some 215 kilometres (134 miles) from its source on Plynlimon
Plynlimon
in mid Wales
Wales
to the Severn
Severn
estuary. For much of its length the river forms part of the border between England
England
and Wales
[...More...]

"River Wye" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Frank Stenton
Sir Frank Merry Stenton (17 May 1880 – 15 September 1967) was a 20th-century historian of Anglo-Saxon England, and president of the Royal Historical Society (1937–1945).[1] He was the author of Anglo-Saxon England, a volume of the Oxford History of England, first published in 1943 and widely considered a classic history of the period. He delivered the Ford Lectures
Ford Lectures
at Oxford University
Oxford University
in 1929. Stenton was a professor of history at the University of Reading (1926-1946), and subsequently the university's vice-chancellor (1946-1950). During Stenton's period as vice-chancellor at Reading, he presided over the university's purchase of Whiteknights Park, creating the new campus that allowed for the expansion of the university in later decades
[...More...]

"Frank Stenton" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

MPhil
The Master of Philosophy
Philosophy
(abbr. M.Phil. or MPhil, sometimes Ph.M.; Latin
Latin
Magister Philosophiae or Philosophiae Magister) is a postgraduate degree. In most cases, it is an advanced research degree with the prerequisites required for a Master of Philosophy
Philosophy
degree making it the most advanced research degree before the Doctor of Philosophy
Philosophy
( Ph.D.
Ph.D.
or D.Phil.).[1] An M.Phil. is in most cases thesis-only, and is regarded as a senior or second Master's degree, standing between a taught Master's and a Ph.D.[2] An M.Phil
[...More...]

"MPhil" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Historiography
Historiography
Historiography
is the study of the methods of historians in developing history as an academic discipline, and by extension is any body of historical work on a particular subject. The historiography of a specific topic covers how historians have studied that topic using particular sources, techniques, and theoretical approaches. Scholars discuss historiography by topic – such as the "historiography of the United Kingdom", the "historiography of Canada", "historiography of the British Empire", the "historiography of early Islam", the "historiography of China" – and different approaches and genres, such as political history and social history. Beginning in the nineteenth century, with the ascent of academic history, there developed a body of historiographic literature
[...More...]

"Historiography" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Palisade
A palisade—sometimes called a stakewall or a paling—is typically a fence or wall made from wooden stakes or tree trunks and used as a defensive structure or enclosure.Contents1 Typical construction 2 Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
and Rome 3 Precolumbian North America 4 Colonial America 5 Adirondacks 6 Modern uses 7 References 8 External linksTypical construction[edit] Typical construction consisted of small or mid-sized tree trunks aligned vertically, with no free space in between. The trunks were sharpened or pointed at the top, and were driven into the ground and sometimes reinforced with additional construction. The height of a palisade ranged from around a metre to as high as 3-4 m. As a defensive structure, palisades were often used in conjunction with earthworks. Palisades were an excellent option for small forts or other hastily constructed fortifications
[...More...]

"Palisade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Archaeological
Archaeology, or archeology,[1] is the study of human activity through the recovery and analysis of material culture. The archaeological record consists of artifacts, architecture, biofacts or ecofacts, and cultural landscapes. Archaeology
Archaeology
can be considered both a social science and a branch of the humanities.[2][3] In North America, archaeology is considered a sub-field of anthropology,[4] while in Europe
Europe
archaeology is often viewed as either a discipline in its own right or a sub-field of other disciplines. Archaeologists study human prehistory and history, from the development of the first stone tools at Lomekwi
Lomekwi
in East Africa
Africa
3.3 million years ago up until recent decades. Archaeology
Archaeology
as a field is distinct from the discipline of palaeontology, the study of fossil remains
[...More...]

"Archaeological" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Long-distance Footpath
A long-distance trail (or long-distance track, path, footpath or greenway) is a longer recreational trail mainly through rural areas, used for non-motorized recreational walking, backpacking, cycling, horse riding or cross-country skiing.[1] Any route named as a "trail" (or "way", in the UK) will probably be marked, or identified on a map, but it will usually only be described as "long-distance" if it takes the average user more than one day to travel from end to end. Typically, a "long-distance" trail, way or path will be at least 50 km (30 mi) long, but some in Britain are several hundred miles long, and many in the US are much longer. In some countries, official "trails" will have the surface specially prepared to make the going easier. In the UK long-distance paths are usually existing rights of way (often over private land) "joined together" (perhaps with specially negotiated linking sections) to make a named route
[...More...]

"Long-distance Footpath" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

John Davies (historian)
John Davies (25 April 1938 – 16 February 2015) was a Welsh historian, and a television and radio broadcaster. He attended university at Cardiff
Cardiff
and Cambridge and taught Welsh at Aberystwyth. He wrote a number of books on Welsh history.Contents1 Education 2 Life and work 3 Works 4 ReferencesEducation[edit] Davies was born in the Rhondda, Wales,[2] and studied at both University College, Cardiff, and Trinity College, Cambridge. Life and work[edit] Davies was married with four children. After teaching Welsh history at the University of Wales, Aberystwyth, he retired to Cardiff, and appeared frequently as a presenter and contributor to history programmes on television and radio. In the mid-1980s, Davies was commissioned to write a concise history of Wales
Wales
by Penguin Books
Penguin Books
to add to its Pelican series of the histories of nations
[...More...]

"John Davies (historian)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.