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Nymph
A nymph (Greek: νύμφη, nýmphē [nýmpʰɛː]) in Greek and Latin mythology is a minor female nature deity typically associated with a particular location or landform. Different from other goddesses, nymphs are generally regarded as divine spirits who animate nature, and are usually depicted as beautiful, young nubile maidens who love to dance and sing; their amorous freedom sets them apart from the restricted and chaste wives and daughters of the Greek polis. They are beloved by many and dwell in mountainous regions and forests by lakes and streams. Although they would never die of old age nor illness, and could give birth to fully immortal children if mated to a god, they themselves were not necessarily immortal, and could be beholden to death in various forms
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Human Sexual Behavior
Human sexual activity, human sexual practice or human sexual behaviour is the manner in which humans experience and express their sexuality. People engage in a variety of sexual acts, ranging from activities done alone (e.g., masturbation) to acts with another person (e.g., sexual intercourse, non-penetrative sex, oral sex, etc.) in varying patterns of frequency, for a wide variety of reasons. Sexual activity usually results in sexual arousal and physiological changes in the aroused person, some of which are pronounced while others are more subtle. Sexual activity may also include conduct and activities which are intended to arouse the sexual interest of another or enhance the sex life of another, such as strategies to find or attract partners (courtship and display behaviour), or personal interactions between individuals (for instance, foreplay or BDSM)
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Chaste
Chastity
Chastity
is sexual conduct of a person that is deemed praiseworthy and virtuous according to the moral standards and guidelines of their culture, civilization or religion. The term has become closely associated (and is often used interchangeably) with sexual abstinence, especially before marriage and outside marriage.[1][2]Contents1 Etymology 2 In Abrahamic religions2.1 Christianity 2.2 Islam 2.3 Bahá'í Faith3 In Eastern religions3.1 Hinduism 3.2 Sikhism 3.3 Jainism 3.4 Buddhism 3.5 Daoism4 See also 5 References 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The words "chaste" and "chastity" stem from the Latin
Latin
adjective castus meaning "pure". The words entered the English language around the middle of the 13th century; at that time they meant slightly different things
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Latium
Latium
Latium
(/ˈleɪʃiəm/; Latin: [ˈlatjʊ̃]) is the region of central western Italy
Italy
in which the city of Rome
Rome
was founded and grew to be the capital city of the Roman Empire. Latium
Latium
was originally a small triangle of fertile, volcanic soil on which resided the tribe of the Latins or Latians.[1] It was located on the left bank (east and south) of the River Tiber, extending northward to the River Anio (a left-bank tributary of the Tiber) and southeastward to the Pomptina Palus (Pontine Marshes, now the Pontine Fields) as far south as the Circeian promontory.[2] The right bank of the Tiber
Tiber
was occupied by the Etruscan city of Veii, and the other borders were occupied by Italic tribes
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Carmentis
In ancient Roman religion and myth, Carmenta
Carmenta
was a goddess of childbirth and prophecy, associated with technological innovation as well as the protection of mothers and children, and a patron of midwives. She was also said to have invented the Latin alphabet.Contents1 Background 2 See also 3 References3.1 Primary sources 3.2 Secondary sources4 External linksBackground[edit] Porta Carmentalis
Porta Carmentalis
(at location 12)The name Carmenta
Carmenta
is derived from Latin carmen, meaning a magic spell, oracle or song, and also the root of the English word charm. Her original name was Nicostrate, but it was changed later to honor her renown for giving oracles. She was the mother of Evander and along with other followers they founded the town of Pallantium, which later was one of the sites of the start of Rome
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Latin Literature
Latin
Latin
literature includes the essays, histories, poems, plays, and other writings written in the Latin
Latin
language
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Genius Loci
In classical Roman religion, a genius loci (plural genii loci) was the protective spirit of a place. It was often depicted in religious iconography as a figure holding attributes such as a cornucopia, patera (libation bowl) or snake. Many Roman altars found throughout the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
were dedicated to a particular genius locus. The Roman imperial cults of the Emperor and the imperial house developed in part in connections with the sacrifices made by neighborhood associations (vici) to the local genius
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Hesychius Of Alexandria
Hesychius of Alexandria
Alexandria
(Greek: Ἡσύχιος ὁ Ἀλεξανδρεύς), a Greek grammarian who, probably in the 5th or 6th century AD,[1] compiled the richest lexicon of unusual and obscure Greek words that has survived, probably by absorbing the works of earlier lexicographers. The work, titled "Alphabetical Collection of All Words" (Συναγωγὴ Πασῶν Λέξεων κατὰ Στοιχεῖον), includes more than 50,000 entries, a copious list of peculiar words, forms and phrases, with an explanation of their meaning, and often with a reference to the author who used them or to the district of Greece where they were current. Hence, the book is of great value to the student of the Greek dialects, while in the restoration of the text of the classical authors generally, and particularly of such writers as Aeschylus
Aeschylus
and Theocritus, who used many unusual words, its value can hardly be exaggerated
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German Language
German (Deutsch, [dɔʏtʃ] (listen)) is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol
South Tyrol
in Italy, the German-speaking Community
German-speaking Community
of Belgium
Belgium
and Liechtenstein. It is one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship
Opole Voivodeship
in Poland. The languages that are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch, including Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. There are strong similarities in vocabulary with Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although those belong to the North Germanic group
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Walter Burkert
Walter Burkert (German: [ˈbʊɐ̯kɐt]; born 2 February 1931, Neuendettelsau; died 11 March 2015, Zurich)[1] was a German scholar of Greek mythology
Greek mythology
and cult. A professor of classics at the University of Zurich, Switzerland, he taught in the UK and the US
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Naples National Archaeological Museum
The National Archaeological Museum of Naples
Naples
(Italian: Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Napoli, sometimes abbreviated to MANN) is an important Italian archaeological museum, particularly for ancient Roman remains. Its collection includes works from Greek, Roman and Renaissance
Renaissance
times, and especially Roman artifacts from nearby Pompeii, Stabiae
Stabiae
and Herculaneum. It was formerly the Real Museo Borbonico ("royal Bourbon museum").Contents1 Building 2 Collections2.1 Marbles 2.2 Bronzes from the Villa of the Papyri 2.3 Mosaics 2.4 Egyptian Collection 2.5 Secret Cabinet3 Gallery 4 References 5 External linksBuilding[edit] The building was built as a cavalry barracks in 1585. From 1616 to 1777 it was the seat of the University of Naples
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Retinue
A retinue is a body of persons "retained" in the service of a noble or royal personage, a suite (literal French meaning: what follows) of "retainers".Contents1 Etymology 2 Employment 3 Contrast 4 See also 5 Sources 6 External linksEtymology[edit] The word, recorded in English since circa 1375, stems from Old French retenue, itself from retenir, from Latin retenere, hold back, retain. Employment[edit] Such retainers were not necessarily in the domestic service or otherwise normally close to the presence of their lord, but also include others who wore his livery (a kind of uniform, in distinctive colours) and claimed his protection, such as musicians and private teachers. Some were a source of trouble and abuse in the 15th and early 16th century. Often their real importance was very different from their rank: on the one hand, sinecures and supernumerary appointments allowed enjoying benefits without performing full service
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Gaston Bussière
Gaston Bussière
Gaston Bussière
(April 24, 1862 in Cuisery
Cuisery
– October 29, 1928 or 1929[1] in Saulieu) was a French Symbolist
Symbolist
painter and illustrator.Contents1 Biography 2 Gallery 3 References 4 External linksBiography[edit] Bussière studied at l'Académie des Beaux-Arts in Lyon
Lyon
before entering the école des beaux-arts de Paris where he studied under Alexandre Cabanel
Alexandre Cabanel
and Pierre Puvis de Chavannes. In 1884, he won the Marie Bashkirtseff
Marie Bashkirtseff
prize. He was close to Gustave Moreau. He found inspiration in the theatre works of Berlioz
Berlioz
(La Damnation de Faust) as well as William Shakespeare and Wagner. He became in demand as an illustrator, creating works for major authors
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Immortality
Immortality
Immortality
is eternal life, being exempt from death, unending existence.[2] Some modern species may possess biological immortality. Certain scientists, futurists, and philosophers have theorized about the immortality of the human body, with some suggesting that human immortality may be achievable in the first few decades of the 21st century. Other advocates believe that life extension is a more achievable goal in the short term, with immortality awaiting further research breakthroughs. The absence of aging would provide humans with biological immortality, but not invulnerability to death by disease or physical trauma; although mind uploading could solve that issue if it proved possible
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Polis
Polis
Polis
(/ˈpɒlɪs/; Greek: πόλις pronounced [pólis]), plural poleis (/ˈpɒleɪz/, πόλεις [póleːs]), literally means city in Greek. It can also mean a body of citizens. In modern historiography, polis is normally used to indicate the ancient Greek city-states, like Classical Athens
Classical Athens
and its contemporaries, and thus is often translated as "city-state". These cities consisted of a fortified city centre built on an acropolis or harbor and controlled surrounding territories of land (khôra). The Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
city-state developed during the Archaic period as the ancestor of city, state, and citizenship and persisted (though with decreasing influence) well into Roman times, when the equivalent Latin
Latin
word was civitas, also meaning "citizenhood", while municipium applied to a non-sovereign local entity
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