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Novella
A novella is a text of written, fictional, narrative prose normally longer than a short story but shorter than a novel, somewhere between 7,500 and 40,000 words. The English word "novella" derives from the Italian novella,[1] derived from nuovo, which means "new"
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Realism (arts)
Realism in the arts is the attempt to represent subject matter truthfully, without artificiality and avoiding artistic conventions, implausible, exotic, and supernatural elements. Realism has been prevalent in the arts at many periods, and is in large part a matter of technique and training, and the avoidance of stylization. In the visual arts, illusionistic realism is the accurate depiction of lifeforms, perspective, and the details of light and colour. Realist works of art may emphasize the mundane, ugly or sordid, such as works of social realism, regionalism, or kitchen sink realism. There have been various realism movements in the arts, such as the opera style of verismo, literary realism, theatrical realism, and Italian neorealist cinema
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Media (communication)
Media are the collective communication outlets or tools used to store and deliver information or data.[1][2] It is either associated with communication media, or the specialized mass media communication businesses such as print media and the press, photography, advertising, cinema, broadcasting (radio and television), publishing[3] and point of sale.Contents1 Origin and definition 2 Electronic media 3 Social impact 4 Games as a medium for communication 5 See also 6 References 7 Further readingOrigin and definition[edit] The term media is defined as "one of the means or channels of general communication in society, as newspapers, radio, television etc.."[4] The beginning of human communication through designed channels, i.e. not vocalization or gestures, dates back to ancient cave paintings, drawn maps, and writing. The Persian Empire (centred on present-day Iran) played an important role in the field of communication
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Heptameron
For the medieval grimoire called the Heptameron, see Pietro d'Abano.Hinchliff's engraving of Marguerite, Queen of Navarre, from an 1864 edition of The HeptaméronThe Gentleman's Spur catching in the Sheet. Illustration from an 1894 edition of The Tales of the Heptameron.The Heptaméron
Heptaméron
is a collection of 72 short stories written in French by Marguerite of Navarre (1492–1549), published posthumously in 1558. It has the form of a frame narrative and was inspired by The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio. It was originally intended to contain one hundred stories covering ten days just as The Decameron
The Decameron
does, but at Marguerite’s death it was only completed as far as the second story of the eighth day. Many of the stories deal with love, lust, infidelity, and other romantic and sexual matters
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Marguerite De Navarre
Marguerite may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Entertainment 4 Ships 5 Other uses 6 See alsoPeople[edit] Marguerite (given name), including a list of people with the namePlaces[edit]Marguerite, California, a former settlement Marguerite, Pennsylvania, an unincorporated community Marguerite Bay, Antarctic Peninsula Marguerite Island, Adélie Land, AntarcticaEntertainment[edit]
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Black Death
The Black Death, also known as the Black Plague, Great Plague or simply Plague, was one of the most devastating pandemics in human history, resulting in the deaths of an estimated 75 to 200 million people in Eurasia
Eurasia
and peaking in Europe
Europe

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Warren Cariou
Warren Cariou is a writer and associate professor of English at the University of Manitoba.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Honours 3 Works 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Cariou received a B.A. (Hons) from the University of Saskatchewan and an MA and PhD from the University of Toronto (1998). In 1999 he published a book of short stories, The Exalted Company of Roadside Martyrs, with Coteau Books. This was followed up in 2002 with his memoir Lake of the Prairies, which gained him a wider audience. It won the 2002 Drainie-Taylor Prize for Biography and was shortlisted for the 2004 Charles Taylor Prize.[2] In 2005 Cariou served on the jury for the prestigious Scotiabank Giller Prize.[3] Cariou was one of three featured authors in Coming Attractions '95, and has had short stories appear in Stag Line: Stories by Men and Due West, both published by Coteau Books
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H. G. Wells
Herbert George Wells[3][4] (21 September 1866 – 13 August 1946), usually referred to as H. G. Wells, was an English writer. He was prolific in many genres, writing dozens of novels, short stories, and works of social commentary, satire, biography, and autobiography, including even two books on war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called a "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne
Jules Verne
and Hugo Gernsback.[5][6][a] During his own lifetime, however, he was most prominent as a forward-looking, even prophetic social critic who devoted his literary talents to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. A futurist, he wrote a number of utopian works and foresaw the advent of airplanes, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television and something resembling the World Wide Web.[7] His science fiction imagined time travel, alien invasion, invisibility, and biological engineering
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Giovanni Boccaccio
Giovanni Boccaccio
Giovanni Boccaccio
(/boʊˈkɑːtʃioʊ, bə-, -tʃoʊ/; Italian: [dʒoˈvanni bokˈkattʃo]; 16 June 1313 – 21 December 1375)[1] was an Italian writer, poet, correspondent of Petrarch, and an important Renaissance
Renaissance
humanist. Boccaccio wrote a number of notable works, including The Decameron
The Decameron
and On Famous Women. He wrote his imaginative literature mostly in the Italian vernacular, as well as other works in Latin, and is particularly noted for his realistic dialogue which differed from that of his contemporaries, medieval writers who usually followed formulaic models for character and plot.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early life 1.2 Adult years2 Works 3 See also 4 Citations 5 Sources 6 Further reading 7 External linksBiography[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification
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Renaissance
The Renaissance
Renaissance
(UK: /rɪˈneɪsəns/, US: /rɛnəˈsɑːns/)[1] is a period in European history, covering the span between the 14th and 17th centuries. It is an extension of the Middle Ages, and is bridged by the Age of Enlightenment
Age of Enlightenment
to modern history. It grew in fragments, with the very first traces found seemingly in Italy, coming to cover much of Europe, for some scholars marking the beginning of the modern age. The intellectual basis of the Renaissance
Renaissance
was its own invented version of humanism, derived from the concept of Roman Humanitas and the rediscovery of classical Greek philosophy, such as that of Protagoras, who said that "Man is the measure of all things." This new thinking became manifest in art, architecture, politics, science and literature
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Critical Theory
Critical Theory is a school of thought that stresses the reflective assessment and critique of society and culture by applying knowledge from the social sciences and the humanities. As a term, Critical Theory has two meanings with different origins and histories: the first originated in sociology and the second originated in literary criticism, whereby it is used and applied as an umbrella term that can describe a theory founded upon critique; thus, the theorist Max Horkheimer described a theory as critical insofar as it seeks "to liberate human beings from the circumstances that enslave them".[1] In sociology and political philosophy, the term Critical Theory describes the neo- Marxist philosophy
Marxist philosophy
of the Frankfurt School, which was developed in Germany in the 1930s
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Lists Of Books
This is a list of book lists (bibliographies) on, organized by various criteria.Contents1 General lists 2 Selective lists 3 Subject lists3.1 History 3.2 People3.2.1 People in general 3.2.2 Specific persons3.3 Regions and places 3.4 Religion4 Writer lists 5 Series lists 6 Lists of fictional books 7 Lists of manuscripts 8 Mixed media lists 9 Lists by setting 10 See also10.1 Other lists 10.2 Digital libraries11 Further readingGeneral lists[edit]List of 18th-century British children's literature titles List of 19th-century British children's literature titles List of American children's books List of anonymously published works List of autobiographies List of banned books List of books written by teenagers List of book titles taken from literature List of books by year of publication List of children's books made into feature films List of Christian novels List of comic books Lists of dictionaries Lists of encyclopedias
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The War Of The Worlds
The War of the Worlds
War of the Worlds
is a science fiction novel by English author H. G. Wells first serialised in 1897 by Pearson's Magazine
Pearson's Magazine
in the UK and by Cosmopolitan magazine in the US. The novel's first appearance in hardcover was in 1898 from publisher William Heinemann
William Heinemann
of London. Written between 1895 and 1897,[2] it is one of the earliest stories that detail a conflict between mankind and an extraterrestrial race.[3] The novel is the first-person narrative of both an unnamed protagonist in Surrey
Surrey
and of his younger brother in London as southern England is invaded by Martians. The novel is one of the most commented-on works in the science fiction canon.[4] The plot has been related to invasion literature of the time
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Performance
Performance
Performance
is completion of a task with application of knowledge, skills and abilities.[1] In work place, performance or job performance means good ranking with the hypothesized conception of requirements of a task role, whereas citizenship performance means a set of individual activity/contribution (prosocial organizational behavior) that supports the organizational culture.[2][3] In the performing arts, a performance generally comprises an event in which a performer or group of performers present one or more works of art to an audience. Usually the performers participate in rehearsals beforehand. An effective performance is determined by competency of the performer - level of skill and knowledge
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Stefan Zweig
Stefan Zweig
Stefan Zweig
(/zwaɪɡ, swaɪɡ/;[1] German: [tsvaɪk]; 28 November 1881 – 22 February 1942) was an Austrian novelist, playwright, journalist and biographer
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George Orwell
Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 – 21 January 1950),[1] better known by his pen name George Orwell, was an English novelist, essayist, journalist, and critic. His work is marked by lucid prose, awareness of social injustice, opposition to totalitarianism, and outspoken support of democratic socialism.[2][3] Orwell wrote literary criticism, poetry, fiction, and polemical journalism. He is best known for the allegorical novella Animal Farm (1945) and the dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four
Nineteen Eighty-Four
(1949). His non-fiction works, including The Road to Wigan Pier
The Road to Wigan Pier
(1937), documenting his experience of working class life in the north of England, and Homage to Catalonia
Homage to Catalonia
(1938), an account of his experiences in the Spanish Civil War, are widely acclaimed, as are his essays on politics, literature, language, and culture
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