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Nintendo
Nintendo
Nintendo
Co., Ltd.[a] is a Japanese multinational consumer electronics and video game company headquartered in Kyoto
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1964 Summer Olympics
The 1964 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XVIII Olympiad (Japanese: 第十八回オリンピック競技大会, Hepburn: Dai Jūhachi-kai Orinpikku Kyōgi Taikai), was an international multi-sport event held in Tokyo, Japan, from 10 to 24 October 1964
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Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) is a professional baseball organization, the oldest of the four major professional sports leagues in the United States and Canada. A total of 30 teams play in the National League (NL) and American League
American League
(AL), with 15 teams in each league. The NL and AL were formed as separate legal entities in 1876 and 1901 respectively. After cooperating but remaining legally separate entities beginning in 1903, the leagues merged into a single organization led by the Commissioner of Baseball
Baseball
in 2000.[6] The organization also oversees Minor League Baseball, which comprises about 240 teams affiliated with the Major League clubs
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Lists Of Video Game Companies
The following lists of video game companies are available:List of video game developers List of video game publishers List of indie game developersSee also[edit] Game development
Game development
and Video game
Video game

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Subsidiary
A subsidiary, subsidiary company or daughter company[1][2][3] is a company that is owned or controlled by another company, which is called the parent company, parent, or holding company.[4][5] The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. In some cases, particularly in the music and book publishing industries, subsidiaries are referred to as imprints. In the United States railroad industry, an operating subsidiary is a company that is a subsidiary but operates with its own identity, locomotives and rolling stock
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Romanization
Romanization
Romanization
(also spelled romanisation: see spelling differences), in linguistics, is the conversion of writing from a different writing system to the Roman (Latin) script, or a system for doing so. Methods of romanization include transliteration, for representing written text, and transcription, for representing the spoken word, and combinations of both
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Playing Card
A playing card is a piece of specially prepared heavy paper, thin cardboard, plastic-coated paper, cotton-paper blend, or thin plastic, marked with distinguishing motifs and used as one of a set for playing card games. Playing cards are typically palm-sized for convenient handling, and were first invented in China
China
during the Tang dynasty.[1]Contents1 History1.1 Early history 1.2 Persia and Arabia 1.3 Egypt 1.4 Spread across Europe and early design changes 1.5 Later design changes2 Modern deck formats2.1 French suits3 Symbols in Unicode 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 Cited sources 8 External linksHistory[edit] Early history[edit]A Chinese printed playing card dated c
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Love Hotel
A love hotel is a type of short-stay hotel found around the world operated primarily for the purpose of allowing guests privacy for sexual activities. The name originates from "Hotel Love" in Osaka, which was built in 1968 and had a rotating sign.[1]Contents1 Distinguishing characteristics 2 Around the world2.1 Japan 2.2 South Korea 2.3 Thailand 2.4 Other countries3 Economic aspects 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksDistinguishing characteristics[edit] Love hotel
Love hotel
with no windowsLove hotels can usually be identified using symbols such as hearts and the offer of a room rate for a "rest" (休憩, kyūkei) as well as for an overnight stay.[2] The period of a "rest" varies, typically ranging from one to three hours. Cheaper daytime off-peak rates are common. In general, reservations are not possible, and leaving the hotel will forfeit access to the room; overnight-stay rates become available only after 22:00
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Division (business)
A division of a business, sometimes called a business sector, is one of the parts into which a business, organization or company is divided.[1] The divisions are distinct parts of that business. If these divisions are all part of the same company, then that company is legally responsible for all of the obligations and debts of the divisions. However, in a large organization, various parts of the business may be run by different subsidiaries, and a business division may include one or many subsidiaries. Each subsidiary is a separate legal entity owned by the primary business or by another subsidiary in the hierarchy. Often a division operates under a separate name and is the equivalent of a corporation or limited liability company obtaining a fictitious name or "doing business as" certificate and operating a business under that fictitious name. Companies often set up business units to operate in divisions prior to the legal formation of subsidiaries. Generally, only an "entity", e.g
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Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
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Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
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Net Income
In business, net income (total comprehensive income, net earnings, net profit, informally, bottom line) is an entity's income minus cost of goods sold, expenses and taxes for an accounting period.[1] It is computed as the residual of all revenues and gains over all expenses and losses for the period,[2] and has also been defined as the net increase in shareholders' equity that results from a company's operations.[3] In the context of the presentation of financial statements, the IFRS Foundation
IFRS Foundation
defines net income as synonymous with profit and loss.[1] Net income
Net income
is the same as net profit but a distinct accounting concept from profit
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Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all expenses except interest and income tax expenses.[1] It is the difference between operating revenues and operating expenses. When a firm does not have non-operating income, operating income is sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT and operating profit.[2]EBIT = revenue – operating expenses (OPEX)Operating income = revenue – operating expenses[1] A professional investor contemplating a change to the capital structure of a firm (e.g., through a leveraged buyout) first evaluates a firm's fundamental earnings potential (reflected by earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and EBIT), and then determines the optimal use of debt vs. equity. To calculate EBIT, expenses (e.g
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Japanese Yen
The yen (Japanese: 円, Hepburn: en, symbol: ¥; code: JPY; also abbreviated as JP¥) is the official currency of Japan. It is the third most traded currency in the foreign exchange market after the United States dollar
United States dollar
and the euro.[4] It is also widely used as a reserve currency after the U.S. dollar, the euro, and the pound sterling. The concept of the yen was a component of the Meiji government's modernization program of Japan's economy; which postulated the pursuit of a uniform currency throughout the country modeled after the European decimal currency system. Before the Meiji Restoration, Japan's feudal fiefs all issued their own money, hansatsu, in an array of incompatible denominations. The New Currency
Currency
Act of 1871 did away with these and established the yen, which was defined as 1.5 g (0.048 troy ounces) of gold, or 24.26 g (0.780 troy ounces) of silver, as the new decimal currency
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Contract Bridge
Contract bridge, or simply bridge, is a trick-taking card game using a standard 52-card deck. It is played by four players in two competing partnerships,[1] with partners sitting opposite each other around a table.[2] Millions of people play bridge worldwide in clubs, tournaments, online and with friends at home, making it one of the world's most popular card games, particularly among seniors.[3][4] The World Bridge Federation
World Bridge Federation
(WBF) is the governing body for international competitive bridge, with numerous other bodies governing bridge at the regional level. The game consists of several deals,[5] each progressing through four phases. The cards are dealt to the players, and then the players auction or bid to take the contract, specifying how many tricks the partnership receiving the contract (the declaring side) needs to take to receive points for the deal
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Public Company
A public company, publicly traded company, publicly held company, publicly listed company, or public corporation is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over the counter markets. In some jurisdictions, public companies over a certain size must be listed on an exchange
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