HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

National Center For Biotechnology Information
The National Center for Biotechnology
Biotechnology
Information (NCBI) is part of the United States National Library of Medicine
United States National Library of Medicine
(NLM), a branch of the National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
(NIH). The NCBI is located in Bethesda, Maryland and was founded in 1988 through legislation sponsored by Senator Claude Pepper. The NCBI houses a series of databases relevant to biotechnology and biomedicine and is an important resource for bioinformatics tools and services. Major databases include GenBank
GenBank
for DNA
DNA
sequences and PubMed, a bibliographic database for the biomedical literature. Other databases include the NCBI Epigenomics database
[...More...]

"National Center For Biotechnology Information" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gene
A gene is a sequence of DNA
DNA
or RNA
RNA
which codes for a molecule that has a function. During gene expression, the DNA
DNA
is first copied into RNA. The RNA
RNA
can be directly functional or be the intermediate template for a protein that performs a function. The transmission of genes to an organism's offspring is the basis of the inheritance of phenotypic traits. These genes make up different DNA
DNA
sequences called genotypes. Genotypes along with environmental and developmental factors determine what the phenotypes will be. Most biological traits are under the influence of polygenes (many different genes) as well as gene–environment interactions
[...More...]

"Gene" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Comparative Genomics
Comparative genomics
Comparative genomics
is a field of biological research in which the genomic features of different organisms are compared.[2][3] The genomic features may include the DNA
DNA
sequence, genes, gene order, regulatory sequences, and other geno
[...More...]

"Comparative Genomics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Peer Review
Peer review
Peer review
is the evaluation of work by one or more people of similar competence to the producers of the work (peers). It constitutes a form of self-regulation by qualified members of a profession within the relevant field. Peer review
Peer review
methods are employed to maintain standards of quality, improve performance, and provide credibility. In academia, scholarly peer review is often used to determine an academic paper's suitability for publication. Peer review
Peer review
can be categorized by the type of activity and by the field or profession in which the activity occurs, e.g., medical peer review.Contents1 Professional 2 Scholarly 3 Government policy 4 Medical 5 See also 6 ReferencesProfessional[edit] Professional peer review focuses on the performance of professionals, with a view to improving quality, upholding standards, or providing certification
[...More...]

"Peer Review" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Virology
Virology
Virology
is the study of viruses – submicroscopic, parasitic particles of genetic material contained in a protein coat[1][2] – and virus-like agents. It focuses on the following aspects of viruses: their structure, classification and evolution, their ways to infect and exploit host cells for reproduction, their interaction with host organism physiology and immunity, the diseases they cause, the techniques to isolate and culture them, and their use in research and therapy
[...More...]

"Virology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Microbiology
Microbiology
Microbiology
(from Greek μῑκρος, mīkros, "small"; βίος, bios, "life"; and -λογία, -logia) is the study of microorganisms, those being unicellular (single cell), multicellular (cell colony), or acellular (lacking cells).[1] Microbiology
Microbiology
encompasses numerous sub-disciplines including virology, parasitology, mycology and bacteriology. Eukaryotic microorganisms possess membrane-bound cell organelles and include fungi and protists, whereas prokaryotic organisms—all of which are microorganisms—are conventionally classified as lacking membrane-bound organelles and include eubacteria and archaebacteria. Microbiologists traditionally relied on culture, staining, and microscopy
[...More...]

"Microbiology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Molecular Biology
Molecular biology
Molecular biology
/məˈlɛkjʊlər/ is a branch of biochemistry which concerns the molecular basis of biological activity between biomolecules in the various systems of a cell, including the interactions between DNA, RNA, and proteins and their biosynthesis, as well as the regulation of these interactions.[1] Writing in Nature in 1961, William Astbury described molecular biology as:"...not so much a technique as an approach, an approach from the viewpoint of the so-called basic sciences with the leading idea of searching below the large-scale manifestations of classical biology for the corresponding molecular plan. It is concerned particularly with the forms of biological molecules and [...] is predominantly three-dimensional and structural—which does not mean, however, that it is merely a refinement of morphology
[...More...]

"Molecular Biology" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

World Wide Web
The World Wide Web
World Wide Web
(abbreviated WWW or the Web) is an information space where documents and other web resources are identified by Uniform Resource Locators (URLs), interlinked by hypertext links, and can be accessed via the Internet.[1] English scientist Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
in 1989
[...More...]

"World Wide Web" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

National Institutes Of Health
The National Institutes of Health
National Institutes of Health
(NIH) is the primary agency of the United States government
United States government
responsible for biomedical and public health research, founded in the late 1870s. It is part of the United States Department of Health and Human Services with facilities mainly located in Bethesda, Maryland
[...More...]

"National Institutes Of Health" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pfam
Pfam
Pfam
is a database of protein families that includes their annotations and multiple sequence alignments generated using hidden Markov models.[1][2][3] The most recent version, Pfam
Pfam
31.0, was released in March 2017 and contains 16,712 families.[4]Contents1 Uses 2 Features2.1 Creation of new entries 2.2 Domains of unknown f
[...More...]

"Pfam" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
[...More...]

"Digital Object Identifier" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

DNA Data Bank Of Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3]Government Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan shown in green—claimed, but uncontrolled shown in light greenCapital and largest city Tokyo[4] 35°41′N 139°46′E / 35.683°N 139.767°E / 35.683; 139.767Official languages None[5]Recognised regional languages11 languages[6]Ainu Itak Amami Ōshima Kikai Kunigami Miyako Okinawan Okinoerabu Tokunoshima Yaeyama Yonaguni YoronNational language Japanese[5]Ethnic groups (2011[7])98.5% Japanese 0.5% Korean 0.4% Chinese 0.6% otherReligion51.82% Shinto 34.9% Buddhism 4% Shinto sects 2.3% Christianity 7.0% No answer[8]Demonym JapaneseGovernment Unitary parliament
[...More...]

"DNA Data Bank Of Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

XML
In computing, Extensible Markup Language
Language
(XML) is a markup language that defines a set of rules for encoding documents in a format that is both human-readable and machine-readable. The W3C's XML
XML
1.0 Specification[2] and several other related specifications[3]—all of them free open standards—define XML.[4] The design goals of XML
XML
emphasize simplicity, generality, and usability across the Internet.[5] It is a textual data format with strong support via Unicode
Unicode
for different human languages
[...More...]

"XML" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Registry Of Research Data Repositories
The Registry of Research Data Repositories (re3data.org) is an Open Science tool that offers researchers, funding organizations, libraries and publishers an overview of existing international repositories for research data.Contents1 Background 2 Content 3 Features 4 Inclusion criteria 5 Partners and Cooperation 6 See also 7 External links 8 ReferencesBackground[edit] re3data.org is a global registry of research data repositories from all academic disciplines. It provides an overview of existing research data repositories in order to help researchers to identify a suitable repository for their data and thus comply with requirements set out in data policies.[1] The registry was officially launched in May 2013.[2] Content[edit] In March 2014 the registry lists 634 research data repositories from around the world covering all academic disciplines
[...More...]

"Registry Of Research Data Repositories" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

European Molecular Biology Laboratory
The European Molecular Biology Laboratory
European Molecular Biology Laboratory
(EMBL) is a molecular biology research institution supported by 22 member states, four prospect and two associate member states.[2] EMBL was created in 1974 and is an intergovernmental organisation funded by public research money from its member states. Research at EMBL is conducted by approximately 85 independent groups covering the spectrum of molecular biology. The Laboratory operates from five sites: the main laboratory in Heidelberg, and outstations in Hinxton
Hinxton
(the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI), in England), Grenoble
Grenoble
(France), Hamburg
Hamburg
(Germany), Monterotondo
Monterotondo
(near Rome) and Barcelona
Barcelona
(Spain)
[...More...]

"European Molecular Biology Laboratory" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Claude Pepper
Claude Denson Pepper (September 8, 1900 – May 30, 1989) was an American politician of the Democratic Party, and a spokesman for left-liberalism and the elderly. He represented Florida
Florida
in the United States Senate from 1936 to 1951 and the Miami area in the United States House of Representatives from 1963 until 1989. Born in Chambers County, Alabama, Pepper established a legal practice in Perry, Florida
Florida
after graduating from Harvard Law School. After serving a single term in the Florida
Florida
House of Representatives, Pepper won a 1936 special election to succeed Senator Duncan U
[...More...]

"Claude Pepper" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.