HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Militarism
Militarism
Militarism
is the belief or the desire of a government or a people that a state should maintain a strong military capability to use it aggressively to expand national interests and/or values; examples of modern militarist states include the United States, Russia
Russia
and France.[1] It may also
[...More...]

"Militarism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Swarming (military)
Military swarming is a battlefield tactic designed to overwhelm or saturate the defenses of the principal target or objective. On the other-hand, defenders can overcome attempts at swarming, by launching counter-swarming measures that are designed to neutralize or otherwise repel such attacks. Military swarming is often encountered in asymmetric warfare where opposing forces are not of the same size, or capacity. In such situations, swarming involves the use of a decentralized force against an opponent, in a manner that emphasizes mobility, communication, unit autonomy and coordination or synchronization.[1] Historically military forces have used the principles of swarming without really examining them explicitly, but there is now active research in consciously examining military doctrines that draw ideas from swarming
[...More...]

"Swarming (military)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Military Tactics
Military
Military
tactics are the science and art of organizing a military force, and the techniques for combining and using weapons and military units to engage and defeat an enemy in battle.[1] Changes in philosophy and technology have been reflected in changes to military tactics. In contemporary military science, tactics are the lowest of three planning levels: (i) strategic, (ii) operational, and (iii) tactical. The highest level of planning is strategy: how force is translated into political objectives by bridging the means and ends of war. The intermediate level, operational, the conversion of strategy into tactics, deals with formations of units
[...More...]

"Military Tactics" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Biological Warfare
Biological warfare
Biological warfare
(BW)—also known as germ warfare—is the use of biological toxins or infectious agents such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi with the intent to kill or incapacitate humans, animals or plants as an act of war. Biological weapons (often termed "bio-weapons", "biological threat agents", or "bio-agents") are living organisms or replicating entities (viruses, which are not universally considered "alive") that reproduce or replicate within their host victims. Entomological (insect) warfare is also considered a type of biological weapon. This type of warfare is distinct from nuclear warfare and chemical warfare, which together with biological warfare make up NBC, the military acronym for nuclear, biological, and chemical warfare using weapons of mass destruction (WMDs)
[...More...]

"Biological Warfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Cavalry
Cavalry
Cavalry
(from French cavalerie, cf. cheval 'horse') or horsemen were soldiers or warriors who fought mounted on horseback. Cavalry
Cavalry
were historically the most mobile of the combat arms. An individual soldier in the cavalry is known by a number of designations such as cavalryman, horseman, dragoon or trooper. The designation of cavalry was not usually given to any military forces that used other animals, such as camels, mules or elephants. Infantry
Infantry
who moved on horseback, but dismounted to fight on foot, were known in the 17th and early 18th centuries as dragoons, a class of mounted infantry which later evolved into cavalry proper while retaining their historic title. Cavalry
Cavalry
had the advantage of improved mobility, and a man fighting from horseback also had the advantages of greater height, speed, and inertial mass over an opponent on foot
[...More...]

"Cavalry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Chemical Warfare
Chemical warfare
Chemical warfare
(CW) involves using the toxic properties of chemical substances as weapons. This type of warfare is distinct from nuclear warfare and biological warfare, which together make up NBC, the military acronym for nuclear, biological, and chemical (warfare or weapons), all of which are considered "weapons of mass destruction" (WMDs). None of these fall under the term conventional weapons which are primarily effective due to their destructive potential. With proper protective equipment, training, and decontamination measures, the primary effects of chemical weapons can be overcome. Many nations possess vast stockpiles of weaponized agents in preparation for wartime use
[...More...]

"Chemical Warfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Conventional Warfare
Conventional warfare is a form of warfare conducted by using conventional weapons and battlefield tactics between two or more states in open confrontation. The forces on each side are well-defined, and fight using weapons that primarily target the opponent's military. It is normally fought using conventional weapons, and not with chemical, biological, or nuclear weapons. The general purpose of conventional warfare is to weaken or destroy the opponent's military, thereby negating its ability to engage in conventional warfare. In forcing capitulation, however, one or both sides may eventually resort to unconventional warfare tactics.Contents1 Formation of the state 2 The Clausewitzian paradigm 3 Prevalence 4 Decline 5 Replacement 6 See also 7 Footnotes 8 External linksFormation of the state[edit] Further information: State formation The state was first advocated by Plato, then found more acceptance in the consolidation of power under the Roman Catholic Church
[...More...]

"Conventional Warfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Cyberweapon
A cyberweapon is a malware agent employed for military, paramilitary, or intelligence objectives.[citation needed]Contents1 General characteristics1.1 Sponsor 1.2 Objectives 1.3 Target 1.4 Distinctions from viruses and other malware2 Probable cyberweapons 3 Control and disarmament 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeneral characteristics[edit] Requirements for the term vary widely; the most common criteria seem to be for a malware agent which:Is sponsored or employed by a state or non-state actor. Meets an objective which would otherwise require espionage or the use of force. Is employed against specific targets.Sponsor[edit] Part of the distinction from other malware is that the agent is sponsored—that is, commissioned, developed, and/or actually used—not by a black-hat hacker or organized criminal group, but instead by a state or a non-state actor, the latter potentially including terrorist groups and other entities proposed
[...More...]

"Cyberweapon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Electronic Warfare
Electronic warfare
Electronic warfare
(EW) is any action involving the use of the electromagnetic spectrum or directed energy to control the spectrum, attack of an enemy, or impede enemy assaults via the spectrum. The purpose of electronic warfare is to deny the opponent the advantage of, and ensure friendly unimpeded access to, the EM spectrum
[...More...]

"Electronic Warfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Infantry
Infantry
Infantry
is the branch of an army that engages in military combat on foot, distinguished from cavalry, artillery, and tank forces. Also known as foot soldiers, infantry traditionally relies on moving by foot between combats as well, but may also use mounts, military vehicles, or other transport
[...More...]

"Infantry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nuclear Warfare
Nuclear warfare
Nuclear warfare
(sometimes atomic warfare or thermonuclear warfare) is a military conflict or political strategy in which nuclear weaponry is used to inflict damage on the enemy. Nuclear weapons are weapons of mass destruction; in contrast to conventional warfare, nuclear warfare can produce destruction in a much shorter time and can have a long-lasting radiological warfare result
[...More...]

"Nuclear Warfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Psychological Warfare
Psychological
Psychological
warfare (PSYWAR), or the basic aspects of modern psychological operations (PSYOP), have been known by many other names or terms, including MISO, Psy Ops, political warfare, "Hearts and Minds", and propaganda.[1] The term is used "to denote any action which is practiced mainly by psychological methods with the aim of evoking a planned psychological reaction in other people".[2] Various techniques are used, and are aimed at influencing a target audience's value system, belief system, emotions, motives, reasoning, or behavior. It is used to induce confessions or reinforce attitudes and behaviors favorable to the originator's objectives, and are sometimes combined with black operations or false flag tactics. It is also used to destroy the morale of enemies through tactics that aim to depress troops' psychological states.[3][4] Target audiences can be governments, organizations, groups, and individuals, and is not just limited to soldiers
[...More...]

"Psychological Warfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Unconventional Warfare
Unconventional warfare
Unconventional warfare
(abbreviated UW) is the support of a foreign insurgency or resistance movement against its government or an occupying power. Whereas conventional warfare is used to reduce the opponent's military capability directly through attacks and maneuvers, unconventional warfare is an attempt to achieve victory indirectly through a proxy force.[1] UW contrasts with conventional warfare in that forces are often covert or not well-defined and it relies heavily on subversion and guerrilla warfare.Contents1 Objectives 2 Methods and organization 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksObjectives[edit] As with all forms of warfare, the general objective of unconventional warfare is to instill a belief that peace and security are not possible without compromise or concession. Two original definition are claiming: "The intent of U.S
[...More...]

"Unconventional Warfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Air Combat Manoeuvring
Air combat manoeuvring
Air combat manoeuvring
(also known as ACM or dogfighting) is the tactical art of moving, turning and/or situating one's fighter aircraft in order to attain a position from which an attack can be made on another aircraft. Air combat manoeuvres rely on offensive and defensive basic fighter manoeuvring (BFM) to gain an advantage over an aerial opponent.Contents1 Historical overview 2 Tactics 3 Example manoeuvring 4 See also 5 Further reading 6 References 7 External linksHistorical overview[edit] Military aviation appeared in World War I
World War I
where aircraft were initially used to spot enemy troop concentrations, field gun positions and movements. Early aerial combat consisted of aviators shooting at one another with hand held weapons.[1] The first recorded aircraft to be shot down by another aircraft, which occurred on October 5, 1914, was a German Aviatik
[...More...]

"Air Combat Manoeuvring" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Armoured Warfare
Armoured warfare, mechanised warfare or tank warfare is the use of armoured fighting vehicles in modern warfare
[...More...]

"Armoured Warfare" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Battle
A battle is a combat in warfare between two or more armed forces, or combatants. A war sometimes consists of many battles. Battles generally are well defined in duration, area, and force commitment.[1] A battle with only limited engagement between the forces and without decisive results is sometimes called a skirmish. Wars and military campaigns are guided by strategy, whereas battles take place on a level of planning and execution known as operational mobility.[2] German strategist Carl von Clausewitz
Carl von Clausewitz
stated that "the employment of battles ..
[...More...]

"Battle" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.