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Manzanar
Manzanar
Manzanar
is most widely known as the site of one of ten American concentration camps where over 110,000 Japanese Americans
Japanese Americans
were unjustly incarcerated during World War II
World War II
from December 1942 to 1945. Located at the foot of the Sierra Nevada in California's Owens Valley between the towns of Lone Pine to the south and Independence to the north, it is approximately 230 miles (370 km) north of Los Angeles
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National Register Of Historic Places
The National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
(NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property. The passage of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) in 1966 established the National Register and the process for adding properties to it. Of the more than one million properties on the National Register, 80,000 are listed individually
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Miwok
Subgroups:Plains & Sierra Miwok Coast Miwok Lake Miwok Bay MiwokThe Miwok
Miwok
(also spelled Miwuk, Mi-Wuk, or Me-Wuk) are members of four linguistically related Native American groups indigenous to what is now Northern California, who traditionally spoke one of the Miwok languages in the Utian family. The word Miwok
Miwok
means people in their native language.Contents1 Subgroups 2 Federally recognized tribes2.1 Non-federally recognized tribes3 History 4 Culture4.1 Cuisine 4.2 Religion 4.3 Languages 4.4 Sports5 Population 6 Influences on popular culture 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksSubgroups[edit] Anthropologists commonly divide the Miwok
Miwok
into four geographically and culturally diverse ethnic subgroups
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Ellis Island
Ellis Island, in Upper New York Bay, was the gateway for over 12 million immigrants to the U.S. as the United States' busiest immigrant inspection station for over 60 years[8] from 1892 until 1954. Ellis Island was opened January 1, 1892. The island was greatly expanded with land reclamation between 1892 and 1934. Before that, the much smaller original island was the site of Fort Gibson and later a naval magazine
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American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Committee
(AJC) is a Jewish advocacy group established on November 11, 1906.[1][5] It is one of the oldest Jewish advocacy organizations and, according to The New York Times, is "widely regarded as the dean of American Jewish organizations".[6] Besides working in favor of civil liberties for Jews, the organization has a history of fighting against forms of discrimination in the United States
United States
and working on behalf of social equality, such as filing a friend-of-the-court brief in the May 1954 case of Brown v
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New York Times
The New York Times
The New York Times
(sometimes abbreviated as The NYT or The Times) is an American newspaper based in New York City
New York City
with worldwide influence and readership.[6][7][8] Founded in 1851, the paper has won 122 Pulitzer Prizes, more than any other newspaper.[9][10] As of September 2016, it had the largest combined print-and-digital circulation of any daily newspaper in the United States.[11] The New York Times is ranked 18th in the world by circulation. The paper is owned by The New York Times
The New York Times
Company, which is publicly traded but primarily controlled by the Ochs-Sulzberger family through a dual-class share structure.[12] It has been owned by the family since 1896; A.G
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The Jewish Week
The Jewish Week is a weekly newspaper serving the Jewish community of the metropolitan New York City
New York City
area.[2] The Jewish Week covers news relating to the Jewish community in NYC. In March 2016, The Jewish Week announced its partnership with the online newspaper The Times of Israel.[3]Contents1 Editorial staff 2 Awards 3 References 4 External linksEditorial staff[edit] Gary Rosenblatt has been the editor and publisher since 1993. Awards[edit] In 2016, The Jewish Week became a finalist for awards in two categories by the Deadline Club, the New York City
New York City
chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, for its series on the battle to improve secular education in chasidic schools
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Paiute
Paiute (/ˈpaɪjuːt/; also Piute) refers to three non-continguous groups of indigenous peoples of the Great Basin. These three groups, although related within the Numic group of Uto-Aztecan
Uto-Aztecan
languages, do not form a single node within that group.[1] The term "Paiute" does not refer to a single, unique, unified group of Great Basin tribes, but is a historical label.[2] Northern Paiute
Northern Paiute
of California, Idaho, Nevada and Oregon. Southern Paiute of Arizona, Nevada and Utah. Mono of California, divided into Owens Valley Paiute (Eastern Mono) and Western Mono (Monache).References[edit]^ Glottolog ^ d'Azevedo, Warren L
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Long Valley Caldera
Long Valley Caldera
Caldera
is a depression in eastern California that is adjacent to Mammoth Mountain. The valley is one of the Earth's largest calderas, measuring about 20 miles (32 km) long (east-west), 11 miles (18 km) wide (north-south), and up to 3,000 feet (910 m) deep. Long Valley was formed 760,000 years ago when a supervolcanic eruption released very hot ash that later cooled to form the Bishop tuff
Bishop tuff
that is common to the area. The eruption emptied the magma chamber under the area to the point of collapse. The second phase of the eruption released pyroclastic flows that burned and buried thousands of square miles
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Owens Lake
Owens Lake
Owens Lake
is a mostly dry lake in the Owens Valley
Owens Valley
on the eastern side of the Sierra Nevada in Inyo County, California. It is about 5 miles (8.0 km) south of Lone Pine, California. Unlike most dry lakes in the Basin and Range Province
Basin and Range Province
that have been dry for thousands of years, Owens held significant water until 1913, when much of the Owens River
Owens River
was diverted into the Los Angeles Aqueduct, causing Owens Lake to desiccate by 1926.[2] Today, some of the flow of the river has been restored, and the lake now contains some water
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Inyo Mountains
The Inyo Mountains
Inyo Mountains
are a short mountain range east of the Sierra Nevada mountains in eastern California
California
in the United States.[3] The range separates the Owens Valley
Owens Valley
to the west from Saline Valley to the east, extending for approximately 70 mi (130 km) SSE from the southern end of the White Mountains, from which they are separated by Westgard Pass, to east of Owens Lake.Inyo Mountain WildernessInyo Mountain crest, north of New York ButteGeologically, the mountains are a fault block range in the Basin and Range Province, at the western end of the Great Basin
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Mono Tribe
The Mono /ˈmoʊnoʊ/ are a Native American people who traditionally live in the central Sierra Nevada, the Eastern Sierra (generally south of Bridgeport), the Mono Basin, and adjacent areas of the Great Basin.Contents1 Culture and geography 2 Tribal groups2.1 Eastern Mono ( Owens Valley
Owens Valley
Paiute) 2.2 Western Mono (Monache or Mono Lake Paiute)3 Language 4 Population 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksCulture and geography[edit] Throughout recorded history, the Mono have also been known as "Mona," "Monache," or "Northfork Mono," as labeled by E.W. Gifford, an ethnographer studying people in the vicinity of the San Joaquin River in the 1910s
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San Francisco State University
San Francisco
San Francisco
State University (commonly referred to as San Francisco State, SF State and SFSU) is a public research university located in San Francisco, California, United States. As part of the 23-campus California State University
California State University
system, the university offers 118 different Bachelor's degrees, 94 Master's degrees, 5 Doctoral degrees (including two Doctor of Education degrees, a Doctor of Physical Therapy, a Ph.D
Ph.D
in Education and a Doctor of Physical Therapy Science), along with 26 teaching credentials among six academic colleges.[6][8][9] The university was originally founded in 1899 as a state-run normal school for training school teachers, obtaining state college status in 1921 and state university status in 1972. The 141 acre campus is located in the southwest part of the city, less than two miles from the Pacific coast
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Tübatulabal People
The Tübatulabal
Tübatulabal
are an indigenous people of Kern River
Kern River
Valley in the Sierra Nevada range of Southern California. They may have been the first people to make this area their permanent home.[3] Today many of them are enrolled in the Tule River Indian Tribe.[4] They are descendants of the people of the Uto-Aztecan language group, separating from Shoshone
Shoshone
people about 3000 years ago.[3]Contents1 Territory 2 Name 3 Bands 4 Culture 5 Language 6 Historical Trauma 7 Population 8 Contemporary tribe 9 Notes 10 References 11 See also 12 Further readingTerritory[edit] The Tübatulabal's traditional homelands extended over 1300 square miles including the Kern and South Fork Kern Rivers drainages (located in the Kern Valley area of California) extending from very high mountainous terrain in the north to about 41 miles below the junction of the two rivers in the south
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Shoshone
The Shoshone
Shoshone
or Shoshoni (/ʃoʊˈʃoʊniː/ ( listen) or /ʃəˈʃoʊniː/ ( listen)) are a Native American tribe with four large cultural/linguistic divisions:Eastern Shoshone: Wyoming Northern Shoshone: southeastern Idaho Western Shoshone: Nevada, northern Utah Gosiute: western Utah, eastern NevadaThey traditionally speak the Shoshoni language, part of the Numic languages branch of the large Uto-Aztecan language family
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Mono Lake
Mono Lake
Mono Lake
(/ˈmoʊnoʊ/ MOH-noh) is a large, shallow saline soda lake in Mono County, California, formed at least 760,000 years ago as a terminal lake in an endorheic basin. The lack of an outlet causes high levels of salts to accumulate in the lake
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