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M42 Motorway
The M42 motorway
M42 motorway
is a major road in England. The motorway runs north east from Bromsgrove
Bromsgrove
in Worcestershire
Worcestershire
to just south west of Ashby-de-la-Zouch
Ashby-de-la-Zouch
in Leicestershire, passing Redditch, Solihull, the National Exhibition Centre
National Exhibition Centre
(NEC) and Tamworth on the way. The section between the M40 and junction 4 of the M6 forms – though unsigned as such – a part of Euroroute E05
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A5 Road
A5 Road may refer to:AfricaA5 highway (Nigeria), a road connecting Lagos and Ibadan A5 road (Zimbabwe), a road connecting Harare and FrancistownAmericasQuebec Autoroute 5, a road in Quebec, Canada County Route A5 (California)
County Route A5 (California)
or Bowman Road, California, USA A005 road (Argentina), a road connecting National Route 8 and National Route 36 in the city of Río Cuarto, Córdoba ProvinceAsiaA5 road (Malaysia), a road in Sabah connecting the Route A4 (Sandakan) and Tawau A 5 road (Sri
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Driver Location Signs
Driver location signs are signs placed every 500 metres (550 yd) along each side of English motorways, and some other major English roads, to provide information that will allow motorists to know their precise location. As of July 2009[update], only roads in England feature these signs; they are not found on roads in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland. This information might be useful in the event of an emergency or breakdown. They were first introduced in 2003, and they complement distance marker posts (small roadside posts used for road maintenance and administrative purposes). Both types of sign display a unique location number
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Measham
Measham
Measham
is a large English village in Leicestershire
Leicestershire
close to the borders with Derbyshire, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
and Warwickshire
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Manchester
Coordinates: 53°28′46″N 2°14′43″W / 53.47944°N 2.24528°W / 53.47944; -2.24528Manchester City
City
and Metropolitan boroughClockwise from top: Skyline of Manchester
Manchester

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Rush Hour
A rush hour (American English, British English) is a part of the day during which traffic congestion on roads and crowding on public transport is at its highest. Normally, this happens twice every weekday—once in the morning and once in the afternoon or evening, the times during which the most people commute. The term is often used for a period of peak congestion that may last for more than one hour. The term is very broad, but often refers specifically to private automobile transportation traffic, even when there is a large volume of cars on a road but not a large number of people, or if the volume is normal but there is some disruption of speed
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International E-road Network
The international E-road network is a numbering system for roads in Europe developed by the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (UNECE). The network is numbered from E 1 up and its roads cross national borders. It also reaches Central Asian countries like Kyrgyzstan, since they are members of the UNECE. European main international traffic arteries are defined by ECE/TRANS/SC.1/2016/3/Rev.1 which consider three types of roads: motorways, express roads, and ordinary roads. In most countries, roads carry the European route designation beside national road numbers. Other countries like Belgium, Norway
Norway
and Sweden have roads with exclusive European route signage (Examples: E 18 and E 6), while at the other end of the scale, British road signs do not show the routes at all
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Intersection (road)
An intersection is an at-grade junction where two or more roads meet or cross. Intersections may be classified by number of road segments, traffic controls, and/or lane design.Contents1 Types1.1 Road
Road
segments 1.2 Traffic controls 1.3 Lane
Lane
design2 Turns2.1 Turn lanes 2.2 Turn signals 2.3 Lane
Lane
management3 Pedestrians 4 Protected intersections for bicycles 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksTypes[edit] Road
Road
segments[edit] One way to classify intersections is by the number of road segments (arms) that are involved.A three-way intersection is a junction between three road segments (arms): a T junction when two arms form one road, or a Y junction – the latter also known as a fork if approached from the stem of the Y. A four-way intersection, or crossroads, usually involves a crossing over of two streets or roads
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Leicestershire
Leicestershire (/ˈlɛstərʃər, -ʃɪər/ ( listen); abbreviation Leics.) is a landlocked county in the English Midlands. The county borders Nottinghamshire to the north, Lincolnshire to the north-east, Rutland to the east, Northamptonshire to the south-east, Warwickshire to the south-west, Staffordshire to the west, and Derbyshire to the north-west. The border with most of Warwickshire is Watling Street (the A5). Leicestershire takes its name from the city of Leicester (unitary authority) located at its centre and administered separately from the rest of the county. The ceremonial county (non-metropolitan county plus the city of Leicester) has a total population of just over 1 million (2016 estimate), more than half of which (c
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Ashby-de-la-Zouch
Ashby-de-la-Zouch
Ashby-de-la-Zouch
(/ˌæʃbɪ dələ ˈzuːʃ/ [2]), often shortened to Ashby, is a small market town and civil parish in North West Leicestershire, England, within the National Forest. It is a sister city with Pithiviers
Pithiviers
in north-central France and lies close to the Derbyshire
Derbyshire
border. The population of the town according to the 2001 census was 11,410 which increased to 12,370 in the 2011 census.[3] Ashby-de-la-Zouch Castle
Ashby-de-la-Zouch Castle
was of importance from the 15th to the 17th centuries. In the 19th century its main industries were ribbon manufacture, coal mining, and brickmaking
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Worcestershire
Worcestershire (/ˈwʊstərʃər/ ( listen) WUUS-tər-shər, /-ʃɪər/ -sheer; written abbreviation: Worcs) is a county in the West Midlands of England. Between 1974 and 1998, it was merged with the neighbouring county of Herefordshire as Hereford and Worcester. The cathedral city of Worcester is the largest settlement and county town. Other major towns in the county include Bromsgrove, Droitwich, Evesham, Kidderminster, Malvern, Redditch, and Stourport-on-Severn. The north-east of Worcestershire includes part of the industrial West Midlands; the rest of the county is largely rural
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Motorway
A controlled-access highway is a type of highway which has been designed for high-speed vehicular traffic, with all traffic flow and ingress/egress regulated. Common English terms are freeway (in Australia, South Africa
South Africa
and parts of the United States
United States
and Canada), motorway (in the United Kingdom, Ireland, New Zealand
New Zealand
and parts of Australia), expressway (in some parts of Canada, parts of the United States, and many Asian countries), and autoroute (in Québec, Canada). Other similar terms include Interstate and parkway
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List Of Roads Zones In Great Britain
A roads are numbered routes in Great Britain. See the article Great Britain road numbering scheme for the rationale behind the numbers allocated. Depending on the first digit of the road's number see:Zone 1 (road beginning with 1) Zone 2 (road beginning with 2) Zone 3 (road beginning with 3) Zone 4 (road beginning with 4) Zone 5 (road beginning with 5) Zone 6 (road beginning with 6) Zone 7 (road beginning with 7) Zone 8 (road beginning with 8) Zone 9 (road beginning with 9)B roads[edit] B roads are numbered routes in Great Britain
Great Britain
of lesser importance than A roads
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Roads In The United Kingdom
The United Kingdom has a network of roads, of varied quality and capacity, totalling about 262,300 miles (422,100 km). Road distances are shown in miles or yards and UK speed limits are indicated in miles per hour (mph) or by the use of the national speed limit (NSL) symbol. Some vehicle categories have various lower maximum limits enforced by speed limiters. Enforcement of UK road speed limits increasingly uses speed guns, automated in-vehicle systems and automated roadside traffic cameras. A unified numbering system is in place for Great Britain, whilst in Northern Ireland, there is no available explanation for the allocation of road numbers.[1] The earliest specifically engineered roads were built during the British Iron Age. The road network was expanded during the Roman occupation. Some of these survive and others were lost. New roads were added in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and from the 17th century onwards
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Stourbridge
Stourbridge
Stourbridge
/ˈstaʊərbrɪdʒ/ is a town in the Metropolitan Borough of Dudley, in the West Midlands county of England. Historically part of Worcestershire
Worcestershire
and situated on the River Stour, Stourbridge developed during the industrial revolution into a centre of glass making. As of 2018[update] the town includes the suburbs of Amblecote, Lye, Norton, Oldswinford, Pedmore, Wollaston, Wollescote, and Wordsley. The 2011 UK census recorded the town's population as 63,298
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Primary Status
The United Kingdom has a network of roads, of varied quality and capacity, totalling about 262,300 miles (422,100 km). Road distances are shown in miles or yards and UK speed limits are indicated in miles per hour (mph) or by the use of the national speed limit (NSL) symbol. Some vehicle categories have various lower maximum limits enforced by speed limiters. Enforcement of UK road speed limits increasingly uses speed guns, automated in-vehicle systems and automated roadside traffic cameras. A unified numbering system is in place for Great Britain, whilst in Northern Ireland, there is no available explanation for the allocation of road numbers.[1] The earliest specifically engineered roads were built during the British Iron Age. The road network was expanded during the Roman occupation. Some of these survive and others were lost. New roads were added in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and from the 17th century onwards
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