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French Language

The majority of French words derive from Vulgar Latin or were constructed from Latin or Greek roots. In many cases, a single etymological root appears in French in a "popular" or native form, inherited from Vulgar Latin, and a learned form, borrowed later from Classical Latin. The following pairs consist of a native noun and a learned adjective:



Einar Haugen
Einar Ingvald Haugen (/ˈhɡən/; April 19, 1906 – June 20, 1994) was an American linguist, author, and professor at University of Wisconsin–Madison and Harvard University. [1] Haugen was born in Sioux City, Iowa, to Norwegian immigrants from the village of Oppdal in Trøndelag, Norway. When he was a young child, the family moved back to Oppdal for a few years, but then returned to the United States. He attended Morningside College in Sioux City but transferred to St. Olaf College to study with Ole Edvart Rølvaag. He earned his B.A. in 1928 and immediately went on to graduate studies in Scandinavian languages under professor George T. Flom at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he was awarded the Ph.D. in 1931.[2] In 1931 Haugen joined the faculty of the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he stayed until 1962. He was made Victor S
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Uriel Weinreich
Uriel Weinreich (Yiddish: אוריאל ווײַנרײַךUriel Vaynraykh, [uriˈɛl ˈvajnrajx]; 23 May 1926 – 30 March 1967)[1] was a Polish-American linguist. Uriel Weinreich was born in Wilno, Poland, (since 1945, Vilnius, Lithuania) to a family that paternally hailed from Courland in Latvia and maternally came from a well-respected and established Wilno Jewish family, the first child of Max Weinreich (Polish: Mejer Weinreich) and Regina Szabad. He earned his Ph.D. from Columbia University, and went on to teach there, specializing in Yiddish studies, sociolinguistics, and dialectology
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Hawaiian Language
Hawaiian (Hawaiian: ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi, pronounced [ʔoːˈlɛlo həˈvɐjʔi])[3] is a Polynesian language that takes its name from Hawaiʻi, the largest island in the tropical North Pacific archipelago where it developed. Hawaiian, along with English, is an official language of the State of Hawaii.[4] King Kamehameha III established the first Hawaiian-language constitution in 1839 and 1840. For various reasons, including territorial legislation establishing English as the official language in schools, the number of native speakers of Hawaiian gradually decreased during the period from the 1830s to the 1950s. Hawaiian was essentially displaced by English on six of seven inhabited islands. In 2001, native speakers of Hawaiian amounted to less than 0.1% of the statewide population
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ʻokina
The ʻokina (Hawaiian pronunciation: [ʔoˈkinɐ]), also called by several other names, is a unicameral consonant letter used within the Latin script to mark the phonemic glottal stop, in many Polynesian languages. The ʻokina is a letter in the Hawaiian alphabet. It is unicameral—that is, it does not have separate uppercase (capital) and lowercase ("small") forms—unlike the other letters, all of which are basic Latin letters
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Macron (diacritic)
A macron (/ˈmækrɒn, ˈm-/) is a diacritical mark: it is a straight bar (¯) placed above a letter, usually a vowel. Its name derives from Ancient Greek μακρόν (makrón) "long", since it was originally used to mark long or heavy syllables in Greco-Roman metrics. It now more often marks a long vowel
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Soprano

A soprano [soˈpraːno] is a type of classical female singing voice and has the highest vocal range of all voice types. The soprano's vocal range (using scientific pitch notation) is from approximately middle C (C4) = 261 Hz to "high A" (A5) = 880 Hz in choral music, or to "soprano C" (C6, two octaves above middle C) = 1046 Hz or higher in operatic music
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