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Listicle
In journalism and blogging, a listicle is a short-form of writing that uses a list as its thematic structure, but is fleshed out with sufficient copy to be published as an article.[citation needed] A typical listicle will prominently feature a cardinal number in its title, with subsequent subheadings within the text itself reflecting this schema. The word is a portmanteau derived from list and article. It has also been suggested that the word evokes "popsicle", emphasising the fun but "not too nutritious" nature of the listicle.[1] A ranked listicle (such as Rolling Stone's "The 100 Best Albums of the Last Twenty Years") implies a qualitative judgement, conveyed by the order of the topics within the text.[citation needed] These are often presented in countdown order, and the "Number One" item is the last in the sequence
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Journalism
Journalism
Journalism
is the production and the distribution of reports on recent events. The word journalism applies to the occupation (professional or not), the methods of gathering information, and the organizing literary styles. Journalistic media include: print, television, radio, Internet, and, in the past, newsreels. Concepts of the appropriate role for journalism vary between countries. In some nations, the news media is controlled by a government intervention, and is not a fully independent body.[1] In others, the news media is independent from the government but the profit motive is in tension with constitutional protections of freedom of the press. Access to freely available information gathered by independent and competing journalistic enterprises with transparent editorial standards can enable citizens to effectively participate in the political process
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Blog
A blog (a truncation of the expression "weblog")[1] is a discussion or informational website published on the World Wide Web
World Wide Web
consisting of discrete, often informal diary-style text entries ("posts"). Posts are typically displayed in reverse chronological order, so that the most recent post appears first, at the top of the web page. Until 2009, blogs were usually the work of a single individual,[citation needed] occasionally of a small group, and often covered a single subject or topic. In the 2010s, "multi-author blogs" (MABs) have developed, with posts written by large numbers of authors and sometimes professionally edited. MABs from newspapers, other media outlets, universities, think tanks, advocacy groups, and similar institutions account for an increasing quantity of blog traffic. The rise of Twitter
Twitter
and other "microblogging" systems helps integrate MABs and single-author blogs into the news media
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is an American business-focused, English-language international daily newspaper based in New York City. The Journal, along with its Asian and European editions, is published six days a week by Dow Jones & Company, a division of News Corp. The newspaper is published in the broadsheet format and online. The Wall Street
Wall Street
Journal is the largest newspaper in the United States by circulation. According to News Corp, in their June 2017 10-K Filing with the SEC, the Journal had a circulation of about 2.277 million copies (including nearly 1,270,000 digital subscriptions) as of June 2017[update],[2] compared with USA Today's 1.7 million. The newspaper has won 40 Pulitzer Prizes through 2017[3] and derives its name from Wall Street
Wall Street
in the heart of the Financial District of Lower Manhattan
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List Song
A list song is a song based wholly or in part on a list. List songs typically develop by working through a list, sometimes using items of escalating absurdity. Examples of list songs (and their composers/performers) include the following
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Clickbait
Clickbait is a pejorative term for web content whose main goal is to entice users to click on a link to go to a certain webpage or video. Clickbait headlines typically aim to exploit the "curiosity gap", providing just enough information to make readers curious, but not enough to satisfy their curiosity without clicking through to the linked content.[1][2][3] From a historical perspective, the techniques employed by clickbait authors can be considered derivative of yellow journalism, which presented little or no legitimate well-researched news and instead used eye-catching headlines that included exaggerations of news events, scandal-mongering, or sensationalism.[4][5] For sites that thrive on thousands of click-thro
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The Infinity Of Lists
The Infinity of Lists is a book by Umberto Eco on the topic of lists (2009) ISBN 978-0847832965. The title of the original Italian edition was La Vertigine della Lista (The Vertigo of Lists) (2009) ISBN 978-8845263453
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Umberto Eco
Umberto Eco
Umberto Eco
OMRI (/ˈɛkoʊ/; Italian: [umˈbɛrto ˈɛːko]; 5 January 1932 – 19 February 2016) was an Italian novelist, literary critic, philosopher, semiotician, and university professor. He is best known internationally for his 1980 novel Il nome della rosa (The Name of the Rose), a historical mystery combining semiotics in fiction with biblical analysis, medieval studies, and literary theory. He later wrote other novels, including Il pendolo di Foucault (Foucault's Pendulum) and L'isola del giorno prima (The Island of the Day Before). His novel Il cimitero di Praga (The Prague Cemetery), released in 2010, topped the bestseller charts in Italy.[2] Eco also wrote academic texts, children's books, and essays
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The Analytical Language Of John Wilkins
"The Analytical Language of John Wilkins" (Spanish: El idioma analitico de John Wilkins) is a short essay by Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges originally published in Otras Inquisiciones (1937–1952).[1][2] It is a critique of the English natural philosopher and writer John Wilkins's proposal for a universal language and of the representational capacity of language generally. In it, Borges imagines a bizarre and whimsical (and fictional) Chinese taxonomy later quoted by Michel Foucault, David Byrne, and others.[3][4]Contents1 Summary 2 Commentary and uses by others 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksSummary[edit] Borges begins by noting John Wilkins's absence from the 14th edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
and makes the case for Wilkins's significance, highlighting in particular the universal language scheme detailed in his An Essay towards a Real Character and a Philosophical Language (1668)
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Jorge Luis Borges
Jorge Francisco Isidoro Luis Borges Acevedo KBE (/ˈbɔːrhɛs/;[1] Spanish: [ˈxorxe ˈlwis ˈborxes]  audio (help·info); 24 August 1899 – 14 June 1986) was an Argentine short-story writer, essayist, poet and translator, and a key figure in Spanish-language literature. His best-known books, Ficciones (Fictions) and El Aleph (The Aleph), published in the 1940s, are compilations of short stories interconnected by common themes, including dreams, labyrinths, libraries, mirrors, fictional writers, philosophy, and religion.[2] Borges' works have contributed to philosophical literature and the fantasy genre
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Steven Poole
Steven Poole (born in 1972) is a British author and journalist. He particularly concerns himself with the abuse of language and has written two books on the subject: Unspeak (2006) and Who Touched Base In My Thought Shower? (2013).Contents1 Biography 2 Books2.1 Trigger Happy 2.2 Unspeak 2.3 Who Touched Base In My Thought Shower? 2.4 Rethink: the Surprising History of Ideas3 Journalism 4 Media 5 Other activities 6 References 7 External linksBiography[edit] Poole studied English at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, and has subsequently written for publications including The Independent, The Guardian, The Times Literary Supplement, The Sunday Times, and the New Statesman
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Facebook
Facebook
Facebook
is an American online social media and social networking service company based in Menlo Park, California. Its website was launched on February 4, 2004, by Mark Zuckerberg, along with fellow Harvard College
Harvard College
students and roommates Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz, and Chris Hughes. The founders initially limited the website's membership to Harvard students. Later they expanded it to higher education institutions in the Boston area, the Ivy League
Ivy League
schools, and Stanford
Stanford
University. Facebook
Facebook
gradually added support for students at various other universities, and eventually to high school students. Since 2006, anyone who claims to be at least 13 years old has been allowed to become a registered user of Facebook, though variations exist in this requirement, depending on local laws
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Internet Phenomenon
This is a partial list of social and cultural phenomena specific to the Internet, also known as Internet
Internet
memes, such as popular themes, catchphrases, images, viral videos, and jokes
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Men's Journal
Men's Journal
Men's Journal
is a monthly men's lifestyle magazine focused on outdoor recreation and comprising editorials on the outdoors, environmental issues, health and fitness, style and fashion, and gear. It was founded in 1992[2][3] by Jann Wenner of Wenner Media, who sought to create a publication for "active, accomplished men to fuel an adventurous and discerning lifestyle".[4] Wenner Media sold Men's Journal to American Media, Inc.
American Media, Inc.
in 2017
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Cosmopolitan (magazine)
Cosmopolitan is an international fashion magazine for women, which was formerly titled The Cosmopolitan. The magazine was first published and distributed in 1886 in the United States
United States
as a family magazine; it was later transformed into a literary magazine and eventually became a women's magazine (since 1965). Often referred to as Cosmo, its content as of 2011 includes articles discussing: relationships, sex, health, careers, self-improvement, celebrities, fashion, and beauty
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