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Lancer Evolution
The Mitsubishi Lancer
Mitsubishi Lancer
Evolution, also known as a Lan Evo or just Evo,[1] was a sports sedan based on the Lancer that was manufactured by Japanese manufacturer Mitsubishi Motors. There have been ten official versions to date, and the designation of each model is most commonly a Roman numeral. All use two litre turbocharged inline four-cylinder engines and all-wheel drive systems.[2] The Evolution was originally intended only for Japanese markets, but demand on the "grey import" market led the Evolution series to be offered through Ralliart
Ralliart
dealer networks in the United Kingdom and in various European markets from around 1998
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Shock Absorber
A shock absorber (in reality, a shock "damper") is a mechanical or hydraulic device designed to absorb and damp shock impulses. It does this by converting the kinetic energy of the shock into another form of energy (typically heat) which is then dissipated. Most shock absorbers are a form of dashpot (a damper which resists motion via viscous friction).Contents1 Description1.1 Vehicle suspension2 Early history 3 Types of vehicle shock absorbers3.1 Twin-tube3.1.1 Basic twin-tube 3.1.2 Twin-tube gas charged 3.1.3 Position sensitive damping 3.1.4 Acceleration sensitive damping 3.1.5 Coilover3.2 Mono-tube 3.3 Spool valve4 Theoretical approaches 5 Special
Special
features 6 See also 7 References 8 Sources 9 Bibliography 10 External linksDescription[edit] Pneumatic
Pneumatic
and hydraulic shock absorbers are used in conjunction with cushions and springs
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Wheelbase
In both road and rail vehicles, the wheelbase is the distance between the centers of the front and rear wheels. For road vehicles with more than two axles (e.g. some trucks), the wheelbase is defined as the distance between the steering (front) axle and the centerpoint of the driving axle group. In the case of a tri-axle truck, the wheelbase would be the distance between the steering axle and a point midway between the two rear axles. Wheelbase
Wheelbase
(measured between rotational centers of wheels)Contents1 Vehicles1.1 Varying wheelbases within nameplate 1.2 Bikes 1.3 Skateboards2 Rail 3 See also 4 ReferencesVehicles[edit] The wheelbase of a vehicle equals the distance between its front and rear wheels. At equilibrium, the total torque of the forces acting on a vehicle is zero
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Turbocharger
A turbocharger, or colloquially turbo, is a turbine-driven forced induction device that increases an internal combustion engine's efficiency and power output by forcing extra air into the combustion chamber.[1][2] This improvement over a naturally aspirated engine's power output is due to the fact that the compressor can force more air—and proportionately more fuel—into the combustion chamber than atmospheric pressure (and for that matter, ram air intakes) alone. Turbochargers were originally known as turbosuperchargers when all forced induction devices were classified as superchargers. Today the term "supercharger" is typically applied only to mechanically driven forced induction devices. The key difference between a turbocharger and a conventional supercharger is that a supercharger is mechanically driven by the engine, often through a belt connected to the crankshaft, whereas a turbocharger is powered by a turbine driven by the engine's exhaust gas
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FIA
The Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile
Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile
(FIA, English: International Automobile Federation) is an association established as the Association Internationale des Automobile Clubs Reconnus (AIACR, English: 'International Association of Recognized Automobile Clubs') on 20 June 1904 to represent the interests of motoring organisations and motor car users. To the general public, the FIA is mostly known as the governing body for many auto racing events
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Okazaki, Aichi
Okazaki (岡崎市, Okazaki-shi) is a city located in Aichi Prefecture, Japan. In 2010, the city had an estimated population of 372,357 and a population density of 991.88 persons per km2. The total area was 387.20 km2 (149.50 sq mi).Contents1 Geography1.1 Surrounding municipalities2 History 3 Demographics3.1 Language4 Transportation4.1 Railway 4.2 Expressways 4.3 Japan
Japan
National Route5 Education5.1 Universities and colleges 5.2 Primary and secondary schools6 Local attractions6.1 Okazaki Castle 6.2 Fireworks 6.3 Hatchō miso 6.4 Takisan7 Twin towns/sister cities 8 Noted people from Okazaki 9 References 10 External linksGeography[edit] Okazaki is in the coastal plains of southeastern Aichi Prefecture. The ground rises to undulating hills in the former Nukata area to the northeast
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Car Dealership
A car dealership or vehicle local distribution is a business that sells new or used cars at the retail level, based on a dealership contract with an automaker or its sales subsidiary. It employs automobile salespeople to sell their automotive vehicles. It may also provide maintenance services for cars, and employ automotive technicians to stock and sell spare automobile parts and process warranty claims.Contents1 History of car dealerships 2 Multibrand car dealers 3 Auto transport 4 See also4.1 Organizations5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory of car dealerships[edit] The early cars were sold by automakers to customers directly, or through a variety of channels that included mail order, department stores, and traveling representatives. The first dealership in the United States was established in 1898 by William E. Metzger. Direct sales by an automaker to consumers are now limited by most states in the U.S
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Subaru
Coordinates: 36°17′51″N 139°22′05″E / 36.2975685°N 139.368058°E / 36.2975685; 139.368058SubaruConfidence in Motion Subaru
Subaru
corporate headquarters buildingNative nameスバルIndustry Automobile
Automobile
manufacturingFounde
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Gentlemen's Agreement
A gentlemen's agreement or gentleman's agreement is an informal and legally non-binding agreement between two or more parties. It is typically oral, though it may be written, or simply understood as part of an unspoken agreement by convention or through mutually beneficial etiquette. The essence of a gentlemen's agreement is that it relies upon the honor of the parties for its fulfillment, rather than being in any way enforceable. It is, therefore, distinct from a legal agreement or contract, which can be enforced if necessary.Contents1 History1.1 Industry 1.2 International relations 1.3 Trade policies 1.4 As a discriminatory tactic2 See also 3 ReferencesHistory[edit] The phrase appears in British Parliamentary records of 1821,[1] and in Massachusetts public records of 1835.[2] The Oxford English Dictionary cites P. G
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Automobile Platform
A car platform is a shared set of common design, engineering, and production efforts, as well as major components over a number of outwardly distinct models and even types of cars, often from different, but related marques.[2] It is practiced in the automotive industry to reduce the costs associated with the development of products by basing those products on a smaller number of platforms. This further allows companies to create distinct models from a design perspective on similar underpinnings.[2]Contents1 Definition and benefits 2 Examples 3 Advantages 4 Disadvantages 5 Top Hat 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksDefinition and benefits[edit] Platform sharing is a product development method where different products and the brand attached share the same components.[3] The purpose with platform sharing is to reduce the cost and have a more efficient product development process.[4] The companies gain on reduced procurement cost by taking advantage of the commona
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Curb Weight
Curb weight (American English) or kerb weight (British English) is the total weight of a vehicle with standard equipment, all necessary operating consumables such as motor oil, transmission oil, coolant, air conditioning refrigerant, and sometimes a full tank of fuel, while not loaded with either passengers or cargo. This definition may differ from definitions used by governmental regulatory agencies or other organizations
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Manual Transmission
Animation: shifting mechanism of a gearbox with 4 gearsA manual transmission, also known as a manual gearbox, or colloquially in some countries (e.g. the United States) as a stick shift is a type of transmission used in motor vehicle applications. It uses a driver-operated clutch engaged and disengaged by a foot pedal (automobile) or hand lever (motorcycle), for regulating torque transfer from the engine to the transmission; and a gear selector operated by hand (automobile) or by foot (motorcycle). A conventional 5-speed manual transmission is often the standard equipment in a base-model vehicle, while more expensive manual vehicles are usually equipped with a 6-speed transmission instead; other options include automatic transmissions such as a traditional automatic (hydraulic planetary) transmission (often a manumatic), a semi-automatic transmission, or a continuously variable transmission (CVT)
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Double Overhead Camshaft
Overhead camshaft,[1][2] commonly abbreviated to OHC,[1][2] is a valvetrain configuration which places the camshaft of an internal combustion engine of the reciprocating type within the cylinder heads ("above" the pistons and combustion chambers) and drives the valves or lifters in a more direct manner compared with overhead valves (OHV) and pushrods.Contents1 Overview 2 Single overhead camshaft2.1 Alternative SOHC layouts3 Dual overhead camshaft 4 Triple overhead camshaft 5 Camshaft
Camshaft
drive systems5.1 Timing belt 5.2 Timing chain 5.3 Bevel shaft 5.4 Gear train 5.5 Cranks and rods6 Variable valve timing 7 History7.1
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Anti-lock Brakes
An anti-lock braking system or anti-skid braking system[1] (ABS) is an automobile safety system that allows the wheels on a motor vehicle to maintain tractive contact with the road surface according to driver inputs while braking, preventing the wheels from locking up (ceasing rotation) and avoiding uncontrolled skidding. It is an automated system that uses the principles of threshold braking and cadence braking which were practiced by skillful drivers with previous generation braking systems. It does this at a much faster rate and with better control than many drivers could manage. ABS generally offers improved vehicle control and decreases stopping distances on dry and slippery surfaces; however, on loose gravel or snow-covered surfaces, ABS can significantly increase braking distance, although still improving vehicle steering control.[2][3][4] Since initial widespread use in production cars, anti-lock braking systems have been improved considerably
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Sydney International Motor Show
The Australian International Motor Show
Australian International Motor Show
(AIMS) was an annual auto show held in Australia, alternating between the cities of Sydney
Sydney
and Melbourne. Prior to the Sydney
Sydney
event in 2010, both cities previously hosted separate annual exhibitions
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Torque Steer
Torque steer
Torque steer
is the unintended influence of engine torque on the steering, especially in front-wheel drive vehicles. For example, during heavy acceleration the steering may pull to one side, which may be disturbing to the driver. The effect is manifested either as a tugging sensation in the steering wheel, or a veering of the vehicle from the intended path. Torque steer
Torque steer
is directly related to differences in the forces in the contact patches of the left and right drive wheels. The effect becomes more evident when high torques are applied to the drive wheels either because of a high overall reduction ratio between the engine and wheels,[1] high engine torque, or some combination of the two
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