HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Kim Sul-song
Kim Sol-song (Korean: 김설송, born 30 December 1974), is the daughter of North Korea's former leader Kim Jong-il
Kim Jong-il
and Kim Young-sook. She has reportedly been active within the propaganda department, been in charge of literary affairs, and in charge of the security and schedule of her father as his secretary.[1][2] "Seol-song" literally means "snow pine", and the name was reportedly given by her grandfather, Kim Il-sung.[1] Career[edit] Reportedly, she was a favourite of her father
[...More...]

picture info

Kim Il-sung University
Kim Il-sung
Kim Il-sung
University, founded on 1 October 1946, is the first university built in North Korea.[2] It is located on a 15-hectare campus in Pyongyang, the nation's capital. Along with the main academic buildings, the campus contains 10 separate offices, 50 laboratories, libraries, museums, a printing press, an R&D centre, dormitories and a hospital.[3] There is a sizeable computer lab, but it has only limited internet access.[4] The university is named in honour of Kim Il-sung,[2] the founder and first leader of North Korea. Courses in both the department of social sciences and the department of natural sciences take five years to complete.[3]Contents1 History 2 Departments 3 Notable alumni 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] On 25 May 1946 the Preparatory Committee was composed by the founding universities
[...More...]

picture info

Propaganda
Propaganda
Propaganda
is information that is used primarily to influence an audience and further an agenda, which may not be objective and may be presenting facts selectively to encourage a particular synthesis or perception, or using loaded language to produce an emotional rather than a rational response to the information that is presented.[2] Propaganda
Propaganda
is often associated with material prepared by governments, but activist groups, companies, religious organizations, the media, and individuals can also produce propaganda. In the 20th century, the term propaganda had often been associated with a manipulative approach, but propaganda historically is a neutral descriptive term.[2][3] A wide range of materials and media are used for conveying propaganda messages, which changed as new technologies were invented, including paintings, cartoons, posters, pamphlets, films, radio shows, TV shows, and websites
[...More...]

Lieutenant Colonel
Lieutenant
Lieutenant
colonel is a rank of commissioned officer in the armies, most marine forces and some air forces of the world, above a major and below a colonel
[...More...]

picture info

Women In North Korea
The status of women in North Korea
North Korea
is not fully understood outside the country, due to the political isolation of North Korea, the unwillingness of the North Korean authorities to allow foreign investigators access in the country, and the existence of conflicting reports. The official position of the North Korean government
North Korean government
is that women have equal rights with men.[4] North Korea
North Korea
has enacted laws such as the Law on Sex Equality, the Labor Law, and the Law on Nationalization of Essential Industries. Although these social systems have not entirely been successful, they have been integrated into daily life to help women. The reforms implemented provided women's rights at work, rights of inheriting and sharing of properties, and rights of free marriage and divorce. North Korea
Korea
also outlawed polygamy
[...More...]

picture info

Politics Of North Korea
The politics of North Korea
North Korea
(officially the Democratic People's Republic of Korea) takes place within the framework of the official state philosophy, Juche, a concept created by Hwang Jang-yop
Hwang Jang-yop
and later attributed to Kim Il-sung. The Juche
Juche
theory is the belief that through self-reliance and a strong independent state, true socialism can be achieved.[1][2] North Korea's political system is built upon the principle of centralization. While the North Korean constitution
North Korean constitution
formally guarantees protection of human rights, in practice there are severe limits on freedom of expression, and the government closely supervises the lives of North Korean citizens
[...More...]

picture info

Korean Romanization
The romanization of Korean is a system for representing the Korean language using the Latin script. Korea's alphabetic script is called Hangul, and is occasionally written using the combination of, or independently from Hanja
Hanja
(Chinese characters). Romaja literally means Roman letters in Korean, and refers to the Latin script. "Romaja" is not to be confused with "romanization"
[...More...]

picture info

Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilometre (4
[...More...]

picture info

Pyongyang
Pyongyang
Pyongyang
or P'yŏngyang (UK: /ˌpjɒŋˈjæŋ/, US: /ˌpjʌŋˈjɑːŋ/;[6] Korean pronunciation: [pʰjʌŋ.jaŋ]) is the capital and largest city of North Korea. Pyongyang
Pyongyang
is located on the Taedong River
Taedong River
about 109 kilometres (68 mi) upstream from its mouth on the Yellow Sea. According to the 2008 population census, it has a population of 3,255,288.[7] The city was split from the South Pyongan province in 1946
[...More...]

picture info

North Korean Army
The Korean People's Army
Army
(KPA; Chosŏn'gŭl: 조선인민군; MR: Chosŏn inmin'gun) is an institution of the Workers' Party of Korea, and constitutes the de facto military force of North Korea. Under the Songun
Songun
policy, it is the central institution of North Korean community. Kim Jong-un
Kim Jong-un
is the Supreme Commander of the Korean People's Army
Army
and Chairman of the Central Military
Military
Commission. The KPA consists of five branches: Ground Force, the Navy, the Air Force, the Strategic Rocket Forces, and the Special
Special
Operation Force. The Worker-Peasant Red Guards also come under the control of the KPA. The KPA faces its primary adversaries, the Republic of Korea Armed Forces and United States Forces Korea, across the Korean Demilitarized Zone, as it has since the Armistice Agreement of July 1953
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

picture info

Hangul
Hangul
Hangul
(/ˈhɑːnˌɡuːl/ HAHN-gool;[1] from Korean hangeul 한글 [ha(ː)n.ɡɯl]) is the Korean alphabet. It has been used to write the Korean language
Korean language
since its creation in the 15th century under Sejong the Great.[2][3] It is the official writing system of South Korea
South Korea
and North Korea. It is a co-official writing system in the Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture and Changbai Korean Autonomous County
Changbai Korean Autonomous County
in Jilin
Jilin
Province, China. It is sometimes used to write the Cia-Cia language
Cia-Cia language
spoken near the town of Bau-Bau, Indonesia. The alphabet consists of 19 consonants and 21 vowels. Hangul
Hangul
letters are grouped into syllabic blocks, vertically and horizontally
[...More...]

picture info

North Korea
Coordinates: 40°00′N 127°00′E / 40.000°N 127.000°E / 40.000; 127.000Democratic People's Republic of Korea 조선민주주의인민공화국 Chosŏn Minjujuŭi Inmin KonghwagukFlagEmblemAnthem: "Aegukka" Korean: 애국가, The Patriotic SongArea controlled by the North Korean state are shown in dark green; North Korean-claimed but uncontrolled regions shown in light green.Status Sovereign stateCapital and largest city Pyongyang 39°2′N 125°45′E / 39.033°N 125.750°E / 39.033; 125.750Official languages Korean[1]Official script Chosŏn'gŭl[2]DemonymNorth Korean KoreanGovernment Unitary one-party Juche
[...More...]

picture info

Korean Language
The Language Research Institute, Academy of Social Science 사회과학원 어학연구소 / 社會科學院 語學研究所 (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) National Institute of the Korean Language 국립국어원 / 國立國語院 (Republic of Korea) China
China
Korean Language Regulatory Commission 중국조선어규범위원회 中国朝鲜语规范委员会 (People's Republic of China)Language codesISO 639-1 koISO 639-2 korISO 639-3 Variously: kor – Modern Korean jje – Jeju okm – Middle Korean oko – Old Korean oko – Proto KoreanLinguist Listokm Middle Korean  oko Old KoreanGlottolog kore1280[2]Linguasphere 45-AAA-aCountries with native Korean-speaking populations (established immigrant communities in green).This article contains IPA phonetic symbols
[...More...]

picture info

McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
romanization (/məˈkuːn ˈraɪʃaʊ.ər/) is one of the two most widely used Korean language
Korean language
romanization systems. A modified version of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
was the official romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
until 2000, when it was replaced by the Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
system. A variant of McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
is still used as the official system in North Korea.[citation needed] The system was created in 1937 by George M. McCune and Edwin O. Reischauer
[...More...]

picture info

Revised Romanization Of Korean
The Revised Romanization of Korean
Romanization of Korean
(국어의 로마자 표기법; gugeoui romaja pyogibeop. op; lit. "Roman-letter notation of the national language") is the official Korean language romanization system in South Korea
South Korea
proclaimed by the Ministry of Culture and Tourism to replace the older McCune–Reischauer
McCune–Reischauer
system. The new system eliminates diacritics in favor of digraphs and adheres more closely to Korean phonology than to a suggestive rendition of Korean phonetics for non-native speakers. The Revised Romanization limits itself to the ISO basic Latin alphabet, apart from limited, often optional use of the hyphen. It was developed by the National Academy of the Korean Language from 1995 and was released to the public on 7 July 2000 by South Korea's Ministry of Culture and Tourism in Proclamation No
[...More...]

.