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Kilim
A kilim (Azerbaijani: Kilim
Kilim
کیلیم, Turkish: Kilim, Turkmen: Kilim, Persian: گلیم‎ gelīm) is a flat tapestry-woven carpet or rug traditionally produced in countries of the former Ottoman Empire, Iran, Azerbaijan
Azerbaijan
and Turkic countries
Turkic countries
of Central Asia. Kilims can be purely decorative or can function as prayer rugs. Modern kilims are popular floor-coverings in Western households.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Weaving
Weaving
technique 4 Motifs 5 Rugs and commerce 6 Types6.1 Persian (Iranian) 6.2 Balkans and Eastern Europe 6.3 Anatolian (Turkish)7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 Further reading 11 External linksEtymology[edit] The term 'kilim' originates from the Persian gelīm (گلیم) where it means 'to spread roughly',[1] perhaps of Mongolian origin.[2] History[edit] Like pile carpets, kilim have been produced since ancient times
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Keilim
Keilim
Keilim
or Kelim (Hebrew: כֵּלִים‬, literally "Vessels") is the first tractate in the Order of Tohorot in the Mishnah. It contains thirty chapters, making it the longest tractate in the entire Mishnah. The Tosefta
Tosefta
on Keilim
Keilim
consists of twenty-five chapters,[1] divided into Bava Kama ("First Gate"), Bava Metzia ("Middle Gate"), and Bava Batra ("Final Gate") of Keilim
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Aniline
Aniline
Aniline
is an organic compound with the formula C6H5NH2. Consisting of a phenyl group attached to an amino group, aniline is the prototypical aromatic amine. Its main use is in the manufacture of precursors to polyurethane and other industrial chemicals. Like most volatile amines, it has the odor of rotten fish
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Wolf
refer Subspecies
Subspecies
of Canis
Canis
lupusHistorical (red + green) and modern (green) range of wild subspecies of C. lupusThe gray wolf ( Canis
Canis
lupus),[a] also known as the timber wolf[3][4] or western wolf,[b] is a canine native to the wilderness and remote areas of Eurasia
Eurasia
and North America
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Trousseau Chest
A hope chest, also called dowry chest, cedar chest, trousseau chest or glory box is a piece of furniture traditionally used to collect items such as clothing and household linen, by unmarried young women in anticipation of married life. The term "hope chest" or "cedar chest" is used in the midwest or south of the United States; in the United Kingdom, the term is "bottom drawer"; while "glory box" is used by women in Australia.[1]Girl inspecting her hope chest, by Poul Friis Nybo, c
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Fetter
Legcuffs
Legcuffs
are physical restraints used on the ankles of a person to allow walking only with a restricted stride and to prevent running and effective physical resistance.[1] Frequently used alternative terms are leg cuffs, (leg/ankle) shackles, footcuffs, fetters[2] or leg irons. The term "fetter" shares a root with the word "foot". With respect to humans, shackles are typically used on prisoners and slaves. Leg shackles also are used for chain gangs to keep them together.[3]Chain Gang Street Sweepers, 1909Metaphorically, a fetter may be anything that restricts or restrains in any way, hence the word "unfettered".Contents1 History 2 Controversial use 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit]Standard type leg irons made in TaiwanThe earliest fetters found in archaeological excavations date from the prehistoric age and are mostly of the puzzle lock type[clarification needed]
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Bird
Birds (Aves) are a group of endothermic vertebrates, characterised by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart, and a strong yet lightweight skeleton. Birds live worldwide and range in size from the 5 cm (2 in) bee hummingbird to the 2.75 m (9 ft) ostrich. They rank as the world’s most numerically-successful class of tetrapods, with approximately ten thousand living species, more than half of these being passerines, sometimes known as perching birds. Birds have wings which are more or less developed depending on the species; the only known groups without wings are the extinct moa and elephant birds. Wings, which evolved from forelimbs, gave birds the ability to fly, although further evolution has led to the loss of flight in flightless birds, including ratites, penguins, and diverse endemic island species of birds
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Polygonatum
Polygonatum
Polygonatum
/ˌpɒlɪˈɡɒnətəm/,[2] also known as King Solomon's-seal or Solomon's seal, is a genus of flowering plants. In the APG III classification system, it is placed in the family Asparagaceae, subfamily Nolinoideae
Nolinoideae
(formerly the family Ruscaceae).[3] It has also been classified in the former family Convallariaceae and, like many lilioid monocots, was formerly classified in the lily family, Liliaceae. The genus is distributed throughout the temperate Northern Hemisphere
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Yin/Yang
Model humanity:Xian ZhenrenWen and wuPracticesFenxiang JingxiangFeng shui MiaohuiWu shamanismJitong mediumshipPrecious scrollsInstitutions and templesAssociations of good-doingLineage associations or churchesChinese temple Ancestral shrineChinese Folk Temples' AssociationFestivalsQingming Zhongyuan Zhongqiu Jiuhuangye Qixi Duanwu NianInternal traditions Major cultural formsChinese ancestral religionChinese communal deity religionChinese mother goddess worshipNortheast China
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Victorian Era
In the history of the United Kingdom, the Victorian era
Victorian era
was the period of Queen Victoria's reign, from 20 June 1837 until her death on 22 January 1901. The era followed the Georgian period and preceded the Edwardian period, and its later half overlaps with the first part of the Belle Époque
Belle Époque
era of continental Europe. Defined according to sensibilities and political concerns, the period is sometimes considered to begin with the passage of the Reform Act 1832
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Mathematics And Fiber Arts
Ideas from Mathematics
Mathematics
have been used as inspiration for fiber arts including quilt making, knitting, cross-stitch, crochet, embroidery and weaving. A wide range of mathematical concepts have been used as inspiration including topology, graph theory, number theory and algebra
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Nomad
A nomad (Greek: νομάς, nomas, plural tribe) is a member of a community of people who live in different locations, moving from one place to another in search of grasslands for their animals.[2] Among the various ways nomads relate to their environment, one can distinguish the hunter-gatherer, the pastoral nomad owning livestock, or the "modern" peripatetic nomad. As of 1995, there were an estimated 30–40 million nomads in the world.[3] Nomadic hunting and gathering, following seasonally available wild plants and game, is by far the oldest human subsistence method.[citation needed] Pastoralists raise herds, driving them, or moving with them, in patterns that normally avoid depleting pastures beyond their ability to recover.[citation needed] Nomadism is also a lifestyle adapted to infertile regions such as steppe, tundra, or ice and sand, where mobility is the most efficient strategy for exploiting scarce resources
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Harsin
Harsin
Harsin
(Persian: هرسين‎; also Romanized as Harsīn)[1] is a city and capital of Harsin
Harsin
County, Kermanshah
Kermanshah
Province, Iran. At the 2006 census, its population was 51,562, in 12,001 families.[2] Harsin is situated 44 km east of Kermanshah, and lies 1,570 metres (5,150 ft) above sea level. References[edit]^ Harsin
Harsin
can be found at GEOnet Names Server, at this link, by opening the Advanced Search box, entering "-3065919" in the "Unique Feature Id" form, and clicking on "Search Database". ^ "Census of the Islamic Republic of Iran, 1385 (2006)". Islamic Republic of Iran
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Kermanshah
Kermanshah
Kermanshah
(Southern Kurdish: کرماشان, Kirmashan; Persian: کرمانشاه‎, Kermānshāh; also known as Bākhtarān or Kermānshāhān),[1] the capital of Kermanshah
Kermanshah
Province, is located 525 kilometres (326 miles) from Tehran
Tehran
in the western part of Iran. According to the 2011 census, its population is 851,405. A majority of the population speaks Southern Kurdish
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Konya
Konya
Konya
(Turkish pronunciation: [ˈkon.ja]; Greek: Ἰκόνιον Ikónion, Latin: Iconium) is a major city in south-western edge of the Central Anatolian Plateau and is the seventh-most-populous city in Turkey
Turkey
with a metropolitan population of over 2.1 million
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Malatya
Malatya
Malatya
(Armenian: Մալաթիա Malat'ya; Kurdish: Meletî‎[3]; Classical Syriac: ܡܠܝܛܝܢܐ‎ Malīṭīná; Ottoman Turkish: مالاتيا‎) is a large city in the Eastern Anatolia
Eastern Anatolia
region of Turkey
Turkey
and the capital of Malatya
Malatya
Province. The city has been a human settlement for thousands of years. The Assyrians called the city Meliddu.[4] Strabo says that the city was known "to the ancients"[5] as Melitene
Melitene
(Ancient Greek Μελιτηνή), a name adopted by the Romans following Roman expansion into the east
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