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Keelmen
The Keelmen
Keelmen
of Tyne and Wear
Tyne and Wear
were a group of men who worked on the keels, large boats that carried the coal from the banks of both rivers to the waiting collier ships. Because of the shallowness of both rivers, it was difficult for ships of any significant draught to move up river and load with coal from the place where the coal reached the riverside. Thus the need for shallow-draught keels to transport the coal to the waiting ships
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Tyne And Wear
Tyne and Wear
Tyne and Wear
(/taɪn ... wɪər/) is a metropolitan county in the North East region of England
England
around the mouths of the rivers Tyne and Wear. It came into existence in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972. It consists of the five metropolitan boroughs of South Tyneside, North Tyneside, City of Newcastle upon Tyne, Gateshead and City of Sunderland
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Sou'wester
A Sou'wester
Sou'wester
is a traditional form of collapsible oilskin rain hat that is longer in the back than the front to protect the neck fully.[1] A gutter front brim is sometimes featured. A possible theory for the derivation of the name is to do with the Sou'wester
Sou'wester
wind which is the prevailing wind in the seas around the UK. A Sou'west wind tends to bring warm air containing moisture, thus rain. A fishing net would always be brought up in the lee of the wind so that a fisherman facing the net would have his back to the wind and without a hat the rain would be driven down the fisherman's neck, above his oilskin jacket. A Sou'wester
Sou'wester
hat has a roll up brim at the front which works like a gutter whilst keeping the face clear. The hat extends down the back, bridging and protecting the neck
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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County Durham
County Durham (/ˈdʌrəm/, locally /ˈdɜːrəm/) is a county[N 1] in North East England.[2] The county town is Durham, a cathedral city. The largest settlement is Darlington, closely followed by Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees. It borders Tyne and Wear to the north east, Northumberland to the north, Cumbria to the west and North Yorkshire to the south.[3] The county's historic boundaries stretch between the rivers Tyne and Tees, and so includes places such as Gateshead, Jarrow, South Shields and Sunderland. During the Middle Ages the county was an ecclesiastical centre; this was mainly due to the shrine of St Cuthbert being in Durham Cathedral, and the extensive powers granted to the Bishop of Durham as ruler of the County Palatine of Durham. The county has a mixture of mining and farming heritage, as well as a heavy railway industry, particularly in the southeast of the county in Darlington, Shildon and Stockton
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Seaham
Seaham, formerly Seaham
Seaham
Harbour, is a small town in County Durham, situated 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Sunderland and 13 miles (21 km) east of Durham. It has a small parish church, St Mary the Virgin, with a late 7th century Anglo Saxon
Anglo Saxon
nave resembling the church at Escomb
Escomb
in many respects.[3] St Mary the Virgin is one of the 20 oldest surviving churches in the UK. Seaham
Seaham
is currently twinned with the German town of Gerlingen.Contents1 History 2 Governance 3 Today 4 Seaham
Seaham
in the media 5 Landmarks 6 Notable people 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The original village of Seaham
Seaham
has all but vanished; it lay between St Mary's Church and Seaham Hall
Seaham Hall
(i.e
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Swing Bridge, River Tyne
The Swing Bridge is a swing bridge over the River Tyne, England, connecting Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
and Gateshead, and lying between the Tyne Bridge
Tyne Bridge
and the High Level Bridge.The machine room, showing one of Armstrong's original three-cylinder oscillating hydraulic motorsThe hydraulic power still used to move the bridge is today derived from electrically driven pumps. These feed a hydraulic accumulator sunk into a 60 foot (18 m) shaft below the bridge; the water is then released under pressure which runs the machinery to turn the bridge
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South Shields
South Shields
South Shields
is a coastal town at the mouth of the River Tyne, England, about 4.84 miles (7.79 km) downstream from Newcastle upon Tyne. Historically in County Durham, the town has a population of 75,337, the third largest in Tyneside
Tyneside
after Newcastle and Gateshead. It is part of the metropolitan borough of South Tyneside
South Tyneside
which includes the towns of Jarrow
Jarrow
and Hebburn
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Tugboat
A tug (tugboat or towboat) is a type of vessel that maneuvers other vessels by pushing or pulling them either by direct contact or by means of a tow line. Tugs typically move vessels that either are restricted in their ability to maneuver on their own, such as ships in a crowded harbor or a narrow canal,[1] or those that cannot move by themselves, such as barges, disabled ships, log rafts, or oil platforms. Tugboats are powerful for their size and strongly built, and some are ocean-going. Some tugboats serve as icebreakers or salvage boats. Early tugboats had steam engines, but today most have diesel engines
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Impressment
Impressment, colloquially, "the press" or the "press gang", refers to the act of taking men into a military or naval force by compulsion, with or without notice. Navies of several nations used forced recruitment by various means. The large size of the British Royal Navy in the Age of Sail
Age of Sail
meant impressment was most commonly associated with Britain. It was used by the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in wartime, beginning in 1664 and during the 18th and early 19th centuries as a means of crewing warships, although legal sanction for the practice can be traced back to the time of Edward I of England. The Royal Navy
Royal Navy
impressed many merchant sailors, as well as some sailors from other, mostly European, nations. People liable to impressment were "eligible men of seafaring habits between the ages of 18 and 55 years"
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Royal Navy
The Royal Navy
Navy
(RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service. From the middle decades of the 17th century, and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century, it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
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The Restoration
The Restoration of the English monarchy
English monarchy
took place in the Stuart period. It began in 1660 when the English, Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under King Charles II
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Roundhead
Roundheads were supporters of the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
during the English Civil War. Also known as Parliamentarians, they fought against Charles I of England
Charles I of England
and his supporters, the Cavaliers or Royalists, who claimed rule by absolute monarchy and the divine right of kings.[1] The goal of the Roundhead
Roundhead
party was to give the Parliament supreme control over executive administration.[2]Contents1 Beliefs 2 Origins and background 3 Notes 4 ReferencesBeliefs[edit] Most Roundheads sought constitutional monarchy in place of the absolutist monarchy sought by Charles I
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