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Keelmen
The KEELMEN OF TYNE AND WEAR were a group of men who worked on the keels , large boats that carried the coal from the banks of both rivers to the waiting collier ships. Because of the shallowness of both rivers, it was difficult for ships of any significant draught to move up river and load with coal from the place where the coal reached the riverside. Thus the need for shallow-draught keels to transport the coal to the waiting ships. The keelmen formed a close-knit and colourful community on both rivers until their eventual demise late in the nineteenth century
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Tugboat
A TUG (TUGBOAT) is a boat or ship that maneuvers vessels by pushing or towing them. Tugs move vessels that either should not move by themselves, such as ships in a crowded harbor or a narrow canal, or those that cannot move by themselves, such as barges , disabled ships, log rafts , or oil platforms . Tugboats are powerful for their size and strongly built, and some are ocean-going. Some tugboats serve as icebreakers or salvage boats . Early tugboats had steam engines , but today most have diesel engines . Many tugboats have firefighting monitors , allowing them to assist in firefighting, especially in harbors
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South Shields
SOUTH SHIELDS is a coastal town at the mouth of the River Tyne
River Tyne
, England
England
, about 4.84 miles (7.79 km) downstream from Newcastle upon Tyne . Historically in County Durham , the town has a population of 75,337, the third largest in Tyneside
Tyneside
after Newcastle and Gateshead. It is part of the metropolitan borough of South Tyneside which includes the towns of Jarrow and Hebburn
Hebburn
. South Shields
South Shields
is represented in Parliament by Labour MP Emma Lewell-Buck
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Impressment
IMPRESSMENT, colloquially, "THE PRESS" or the "PRESS GANG", refers to the act of taking men into a military or naval force by compulsion, with or without notice. Navies of several nations used forced recruitment by various means. The large size of the British Royal Navy in the Age of Sail meant impressment was most commonly associated with Britain. It was used by the Royal Navy
Royal Navy
in wartime, beginning in 1664 and during the 18th and early 19th centuries as a means of crewing warships , although legal sanction for the practice goes back to the time of Edward I of England . The Royal Navy
Royal Navy
impressed many merchant sailors, as well as some sailors from other nations. People liable to impressment were "eligible men of seafaring habits between the ages of 18 and 55 years". Non-seamen were impressed as well, though rarely
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Royal Navy
The ROYAL NAVY (RN) is the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
's naval warfare force . Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years War
Hundred Years War
against the kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy
Navy
traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the SENIOR SERVICE. From the middle decades of the 17th century and through the 18th century, the Royal Navy
Navy
vied with the Dutch Navy
Navy
and later with the French Navy
Navy
for maritime supremacy. From the mid 18th century it was the world's most powerful navy until surpassed by the United States Navy
Navy
during the Second World War
Second World War

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Tyne And Wear
TYNE AND WEAR ( /ˌtaɪnəndˈwɪər/ ) is a metropolitan county in the North East region of England
England
around the mouths of the rivers Tyne and Wear . It came into existence in 1974 after the passage of the Local Government Act 1972
Local Government Act 1972
. It consists of the five metropolitan boroughs of South Tyneside , North Tyneside , City of Newcastle upon Tyne , Gateshead
Gateshead
and City of Sunderland
City of Sunderland
. It is bounded on the east by the North Sea
North Sea
, and has borders with Northumberland
Northumberland
to the north and County Durham
County Durham
to the south
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Swing Bridge, River Tyne
The SWING BRIDGE is a swing bridge over the River Tyne
River Tyne
, England
England
, connecting Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle upon Tyne
and Gateshead
Gateshead
, and lying between the Tyne Bridge
Tyne Bridge
and the High Level Bridge
High Level Bridge
. The machine room, showing one of Armstrong's original three-cylinder oscillating hydraulic motors The hydraulic power still used to move the bridge is today derived from electrically driven pumps. These feed a hydraulic accumulator sunk into a 60 foot (18 m) shaft below the bridge; the water is then released under pressure which runs the machinery to turn the bridge. The mechanism used for this is still the same machinery originally installed by Armstrong . It has an 281 feet (85.6 m) cantilevered span with a central axis of rotation able to move through 360° to allow vessels to pass on either side of it
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Seaham
SEAHAM, formerly SEAHAM HARBOUR, is a small town in County Durham
County Durham
, situated 6 miles (9.7 km) south of Sunderland and 13 miles (21 km) east of Durham . It has a small parish church , St Mary the Virgin, with a late 7th century Anglo Saxon
Anglo Saxon
nave resembling the church at Escomb
Escomb
in many respects. St Mary the Virgin is one of the 20 oldest surviving churches in the UK. Seaham
Seaham
is currently twinned with the German town of Gerlingen
Gerlingen
. CONTENTS * 1 History * 2 Governance * 3 Today * 4 Seaham
Seaham
in the media * 5 Landmarks * 6 Notable people * 7 References * 8 External links HISTORYThe original village of Seaham
Seaham
has all but vanished; it lay between St Mary's Church and Seaham Hall (i.e. somewhat to the north of the current town centre)
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Special
SPECIAL or SPECIALS may refer to: CONTENTS * 1 Music * 2 Film and television * 3 Other uses * 4 See also MUSIC * Special (album) , a 1992 album by Vesta Williams * "Special" (Garbage song) , 1998 * "Special" (Mew song) , 2005 * "Special" (Stephen Lynch song) , 2000 * The Specials
The Specials
, a British band * "Special", a song by Violent Femmes on The Blind Leading the Naked * "Special", a song on
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International Standard Book Number
The INTERNATIONAL STANDARD BOOK NUMBER (ISBN) is a unique numeric commercial book identifier. An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book , a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-based and varies from country to country, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN configuration of recognition was generated in 1967 based upon the 9-digit STANDARD BOOK NUMBERING (SBN) created in 1966. The 10-digit ISBN format was developed by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and was published in 1970 as international standard ISO 2108 (the SBN code can be converted to a ten digit ISBN by prefixing it with a zero)
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Geordie Dialect Words
Sheesy Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Geordie_dialect_words additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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County Durham
COUNTY DURHAM (/ˈdʌrəm/ , locally /ˈdɜːrəm/ ) is a county in North East England
England
. The county town is Durham , a cathedral city . The largest settlement is Darlington , closely followed by Hartlepool and Stockton-on-Tees
Stockton-on-Tees
. It borders Tyne and Wear to the north east, Northumberland to the north, Cumbria to the west and North Yorkshire to the south. Historically , the county included southern Tyne and Wear, including Gateshead
Gateshead
and Sunderland . During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
the county was an ecclesiastical centre; this was mainly due to the shrine of St Cuthbert being in Durham Cathedral , and the extensive powers granted to the Bishop of Durham as ruler of the County Palatine of Durham
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London
LONDON /ˈlʌndən/ ( listen ) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
. Standing on the River Thames in the south east of the island of Great Britain , London
London
has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans , who named it Londinium
Londinium
. London's ancient core, the City of London , largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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The Restoration
The RESTORATION of the English monarchy
English monarchy
took place during the Stuart period . It began in 1660 when the English , Scottish and Irish monarchies were all restored under the Stuart King Charles II . It followed the Interregnum that followed the Wars of the Three Kingdoms . The term Restoration is used to describe both the actual event by which the monarchy was restored, and the period of several years afterwards in which a new political settlement was established. It is very often used to cover the whole reign of Charles II (1660–1685) and often the brief reign of his younger brother James II (1685–1688). In certain contexts it may be used to cover the whole period of the later Stuart monarchs as far as the death of Queen Anne and the accession of the Hanoverian George I in 1714; for example Restoration comedy
Restoration comedy
typically encompasses works written as late as 1710
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Roundhead
ROUNDHEADS were the supporters of the Parliament of England
Parliament of England
during the English Civil War . Also known as PARLIAMENTARIANS, they fought against