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Kanauj
Kannauj
Kannauj
also spelt Kanauj, is a city, administrative headquarters and a municipal board or Nagar Palika Parishad in Kannauj
Kannauj
yoo district in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. The city's name is a modern form of the classical name Kanyakubja[1] (The city of the hunchbacked maidens). It was also known as Mahodaya during the time of Mihira Bhoja. Kannauj
Kannauj
is an ancient city, in earlier times the capital of the Empire of Harsha
Empire of Harsha
under Emperor Harsha. It is said that Kanyakubja Brahmin's of which Shandilya's (Rishi Bharadwaj was one of the disciple of Rishi Sandilya) held to have constituted one of the three prominent families of Kanyakubja Brahmins.[3]are originally from Kannauj
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Kannauj District
Kannauj
Kannauj
district is an administrative district of Uttar Pradesh
Uttar Pradesh
state in northern India, along the river Ganges. The historic town of Kannauj, northwest of Kanpur, is the administrative center. The district was carved out of the Farrukhabad district on September 18, 1997.Contents1 Geography 2 Demographics 3 Historical and Spiritual importance 4 Colleges4.1 Medical College 4.2 Engineering College5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] Kannauj
Kannauj
is located at 27°04′N 79°55′E / 27.07°N 79.92°E / 27.07; 79.92. It has an average elevation of 139 metres (456 feet). The Ganges
Ganges
is the main river of the district at the North East border of the district
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Xuanzang
Xuanzang
Xuanzang
(Chinese: 玄奘; pinyin: xuánzàng; Wade–Giles: Hsüan-tsang; Mandarin: [ɕɥɛ̌ntsâŋ]; fl. c. 602–664) was a Chinese Buddhist monk, scholar, traveller, and translator who travelled to India
India
in the seventh century and described the interaction between Chinese Buddhism
Buddhism
and Indian Buddhism
Buddhism
during the early Tang dynasty.[1][2] Born in what is now Henan
Henan
province around 602, from boyhood he took to reading religious books, including the Chinese classics and the writings of ancient sages. While residing in the city of Luoyang
Luoyang
(in Henan
Henan
in Central China), Xuanzang
Xuanzang
was ordained as a śrāmaṇera (novice monk) at the age of thirteen
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Mahābhāṣya
The Mahābhāṣya (Sanskrit: महाभाष्य, IPA: [məɦɑːbʱɑːʂjə], great commentary), attributed to Patañjali, is a commentary on selected rules of Sanskrit grammar from Pāṇini's treatise, the Ashtadhyayi, as well as Kātyāyana's Varttika, an elaboration of Pāṇini's grammar.[1] It is dated to the 2nd century BCE.[2][3]Contents1 Overview 2 Story behind Mahabhashya 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksOverview[edit] Patañjali
Patañjali
is one of the three most famous Sanskrit
Sanskrit
grammarians of ancient India, other two being Pāṇini
Pāṇini
and Kātyayana who preceded Patañjali
Patañjali
(dated to c. 150 BCE)
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[n 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position, and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position
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Mathura
Mathura
Mathura
( pronunciation (help·info)) is a city in the North Indian state of Uttar Pradesh. It is located approximately 50 kilometres (31 mi) north of Agra, and 145 kilometres (90 mi) south-east of Delhi; about 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) from the town of Vrindavan, and 22 kilometres (14 mi) from Govardhan. It is the administrative centre of Mathura district
Mathura district
of Uttar Pradesh. In ancient times, Mathura
Mathura
was an economic hub, located at the junction of important caravan routes
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Varanasi
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Rajgir
Rajgir
Rajgir
(originally known as Girivraj) is a city and a notified area in Nalanda district
Nalanda district
in the Indian state of Bihar. The city of Rajgir (ancient Rājagṛha; Pali: Rājagaha was the first capital of the kingdom of Magadha, a state that would eventually evolve into the Mauryan
Mauryan
Empire. Its date of origin is unknown, although ceramics dating to about 1000 BC have been found in the city
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Ptolemy
Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemy
Ptolemy
(/ˈtɒləmi/; Greek: Κλαύδιος Πτολεμαῖος, Klaúdios Ptolemaîos [kláwdios ptolɛmɛ́ːos]; Latin: Claudius
Claudius
Ptolemaeus; c. AD 100 – c. 170)[2] was a Greco-Roman[3] mathematician, astronomer, geographer, astrologer, and poet of a single epigram in the Greek Anthology.[4][5] He lived in the city of Alexandria
Alexandria
in the Roman province of Egypt, wrote in Koine Greek, and held Roman citizenship.[6] The 14th-century astronomer Theodore Meliteniotes gave his birthplace as the prominent Greek city Ptolemais Hermiou
Ptolemais Hermiou
(Greek: Πτολεμαΐς ‘Ερμείου) in the Thebaid
Thebaid
(Greek: Θηβαΐδα [Θηβαΐς])
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Faxian
Faxian
Faxian
(traditional Chinese: 法顯; simplified Chinese: 法显; pinyin: Fǎxiǎn; 337 – c. 422) was a Chinese Buddhist monk who travelled by foot from China to India, visiting many sacred Buddhist sites in what are now Xinjiang, Pakistan, India, Nepal, Bangladesh
Bangladesh
and Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
between 399-412 to acquire Buddhist texts. His journey is described in his important travelogue, A Record of Buddhist Kingdoms, Being an Account by the Chinese Monk Fa-Xian of his Travels in India and Ceylon in Search of the Buddhist Books of Discipline. Other transliterations of his name include Fa-Hien, Fa-hian, and Fa-hsien.Contents1 Biography 2 Translation of Faxian's work 3 Works 4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksBiography[edit] Faxian
Faxian
visited India
India
in the early fifth century
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Gupta Empire
The Gupta Empire
Empire
was an ancient Indian empire, which existed at its zenith from approximately 240 to 605 CE and covered much of the Indian subcontinent.[1] This period is called the Golden Age
Golden Age
of India.[2][note 1] The ruling dynasty of the empire was founded by Sri Gupta; the most notable rulers of the dynasty were Chandragupta I, Samudragupta, and Chandragupta II. The 5th-century CE Sanskrit
Sanskrit
poet Kalidasa
Kalidasa
credits the Guptas with having conquered about twenty-one kingdoms, both in and outside India, including the kingdoms of Parasikas, the Hunas, the Kambojas, tribes located in the west and east Oxus
Oxus
valleys, the Kinnaras, Kiratas, and others.[4][non-primary source needed] The high points of this period are the great cultural developments which took place during the reign of Chandragupta II
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Mahabharata
The Mahābhārata (US: /məhɑːˈbɑːrətə/,[1] UK: /ˌmɑːhəˈbɑːrətə/;[2] Sanskrit: महाभारतम्, Mahābhāratam, pronounced [məɦaːˈbʱaːrət̪əm]) is one of the two major Sanskrit
Sanskrit
epics of ancient India, the other being the Rāmāyaṇa.[3] The title may be translated as "the great tale of the Bhārata dynasty". The Mahābhārata is an epic legendary narrative of the Kurukṣetra War and the fates of the Kaurava
Kaurava
and the Pāṇḍava princes. It also contains philosophical and devotional material, such as a discussion of the four "goals of life" or puruṣārtha (12.161). Among the principal works and stories in the Mahābhārata are the Bhagavad Gita, the story of Damayanti, an abbreviated version of the Rāmāyaṇa, and the story of Ṛṣyasringa, often considered as works in their own right. Traditionally, the authorship of the Mahābhārata is attributed to Vyāsa
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Rashtrakuta
Rashtrakuta (IAST: rāṣṭrakūṭa) was a royal dynasty ruling large parts of the Indian subcontinent
Indian subcontinent
between the sixth and 10th centuries. The earliest known Rashtrakuta inscription is a 7th-century copper plate grant detailing their rule from Manapura, a city in Central or West India. Other ruling Rashtrakuta clans from the same period mentioned in inscriptions were the kings of Achalapur (modern Elichpur in Maharashtra) and the rulers of Kannauj. Several controversies exist regarding the origin of these early Rashtrakutas, their native home and their language. The Elichpur clan was a feudatory of the Badami
Badami
Chalukyas, and during the rule of Dantidurga, it overthrew Chalukya Kirtivarman II and went on to build an empire with the Gulbarga
Gulbarga
region in modern Karnataka
Karnataka
as its base
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Empire
An empire is defined as "an aggregate of nations or people ruled over by an emperor or other powerful sovereign or government, usually a territory of greater extent than a kingdom, as the former British Empire, Spanish Empire, Portuguese Empire, French Empire, Persian Empire, Russian Empire, German Empire, Byzantine Empire, Ottoman Empire, or Roman Empire".[1] An empire can be made solely of contiguous territories such as the Austro-Hungarian Empire, or of territories far remote from the homeland, such as a colonial empire. Aside from the more formal usage, the term "empire" can also be used to refer to a large-scale business enterprise (e.g
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Deccan Plateau
The Deccan Plateau[1] is a large plateau in southern India. It rises to 100 metres (330 ft) in the north, and to more than 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) in the south, forming a raised triangle within the South-pointing triangle of the Indian subcontinent's coastline.[2] It extends over eight Indian states and encompasses a wide range of habitats, covering most of central and southern India.[3] The plateau is located between two mountain ranges, the Western Ghats and the Eastern Ghats, each of which rises from its respective nearby coastal plain, and almost converge at the southern tip of India. It is separated from the Gangetic plain
Gangetic plain
to the north by the Satpura and Vindhya Ranges, which form its northern boundary
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Malwa
Malwa
Malwa
is a historical region of west-central India
India
occupying a plateau of volcanic origin. Geologically, the Malwa
Malwa
Plateau
Plateau
generally refers to the volcanic upland north of the Vindhya Range. Politically and administratively, the historical Malwa
Malwa
region includes districts of central part of western Madhya Pradesh
Madhya Pradesh
and parts of south-eastern Rajasthan. The definition of Malwa
Malwa
is sometimes extended to include the Nimar region south of the Vindhyas. The Malwa
Malwa
region had been a separate political unit from the time of the ancient Malava Kingdom
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