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Kamakhya
Kamakhya
Kamakhya
(Assamese: কামাখ্যা দেৱী), also known as Siddha Kubjika,is an important Hindu
Hindu
Tantric goddess of desire who evolved in the Himalayan hills. She is worshiped as Siddha Kubjika, and is also identified as Kali
Kali
and Maha Tripura Sundari. According to the Tantric texts (Kalika Purana, Yogini Tantra) that are the basis for her worship at the Kamakhya
Kamakhya
temple, a 16th-century temple in the Kamrup district of Assam. The earlier manifest of the goddess sanctified at the Garo hills is destroyed, although the Vatsayana priests are said to have carried away the manifest of the goddess to the Hindu
Hindu
kingdom in Kashmir and later sanctified in a remote hill forest in Himachal
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Kamakshi
The goddess Kamakshee is the form of Tripura Sundari
Tripura Sundari
or Parvati
Parvati
or the universal mother goddess. The main abode of Kamakshi
Kamakshi
is the Kamakshi Amman temple at Kanchipuram. Other important forms of goddess Tripura Sundari are Meenakshi. Her consort is Shiva. The main temples of Kamakshi
Kamakshi
Devi
Devi
in Goa
Goa
are the Kamakshi
Kamakshi
Rayeshwar temple at Shiroda. This is famous for imparting the great story of imparting knowledge of Kamsutra, the temple is constructed as memorable for deploying the knowledge of Kamasutra mankind. Goddess
Goddess
Kamakshi
Kamakshi
is considered to be the representation of Shri Vidya - Shri Lalita Maha Tripurasundari - she reigns supreme in Kanchi
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Aditi
In the Vedas, Aditi
Aditi
(Sanskrit: अदिति "limitless")[1] is mother of the gods (devamata) and all twelve zodiacal spirits from whose cosmic matrix, the heavenly bodies were born. As celestial mother of every existing form and being, the synthesis of all things, she is associated with space (akasa) and with mystic speech (Vāc). She may be seen as a feminized form of Brahma
Brahma
and associated with the primal substance (mulaprakriti) in Vedanta
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Sanskrit
A few attempts at revival have been reported in Indian and Nepalese newspapers. India: 14,135 Indians claimed Sanskrit
Sanskrit
to be their mother tongue in the 2001 Census of India:[2] Nepal: 1,669 Nepalis
Nepalis
in 2011
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Daksha
According to Hindu legend, Dakṣa (Sanskrit: दक्ष, lit. able, dexterous, or honest one[1] is one of the sons of Lord Brahma, who, after creating the ten Manas Putras, created Daksha, Dharma, Kamadeva and Agni
Agni
from his right thumb, chest, heart and eyebrows respectively.[2] Besides his noble birth, Daksa was a great kshatriya king. Pictures show him as a rotund and obese man with a stocky body, protruding belly, and muscular with the head of an ibex-like creature with spiral horns.Contents1 Daughters 2 Story of Sati and Shiva2.1 Daksha
Daksha
Yagna3 See also 4 References 5 External linksDaughters[edit] According to the Puranas, Daksha
Daksha
had 89 daughters According to Vishnu
Vishnu
Purana and Padma Purana, Daksha
Daksha
and his wife Prasuti had 24 daughters
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Yajna
Yajna
Yajna
(IAST: yajña) literally means "sacrifice, devotion, worship, offering", and refers in Hinduism
Hinduism
to any ritual done in front of a sacred fire, often with mantras.[1] Yajna
Yajna
has been a Vedic tradition, described in a layer of Vedic literature called Brahmanas, as well as Yajurveda.[2] The tradition has evolved from offering oblations and libations into sacred fire to symbolic offerings in the presence of sacred fire (Agni).[1] Yajna
Yajna
rituals-related texts have been called the Karma-kanda (ritual works) portion of the Vedic literature, in contrast to Jnana-kanda (knowledge) portion contained in the Vedic Upanishads
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Tandava
See alsol1=Characteristics of natarajaThe dance of Shiva Shiva
Shiva
Natarajan, the Lord of the Dance. Tamil Nadu, Chola Dynasty, IndiaTāṇḍavam (also known as Tāṇḍava nṛtya) is a divine dance performed by the Hindu
Hindu
god Shiva. Shiva's Tandava
Tandava
is described as a vigorous dance that is the source of the cycle of creation, preservation and dissolution. While the Rudra
Rudra
Tandava
Tandava
depicts his violent nature, first as the creator and later as the destroyer of the universe, even of death itself; the Ananda Tandava
Tandava
depicts him as enjoying. In Shaiva Siddhanta
Shaiva Siddhanta
tradition, Shiva
Shiva
as Nataraja
Nataraja
(lit
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Vishnu
Vishnu
Vishnu
( Sanskrit
Sanskrit
pronunciation: [vɪʂɳu]; Sanskrit: विष्णु, IAST: Viṣṇu) is one of the principal deities of Hinduism, and the Supreme Being
Supreme Being
in its Vaishnavism
Vaishnavism
tradition.[5][6] Vishnu
Vishnu
is the "preserver" in the Hindu
Hindu
trinity (Trimurti) that includes Brahma
Brahma
and Shiva.[7] In Vaishnavism, Vishnu
Vishnu
is identical to the formless metaphysical concept called Brahman, the supreme, the Svayam Bhagavan, who takes various avatars as "the preserver, protector" whenever the world is threatened with evil, chaos, and destructive forces.[8] His avatars most notably include Rama
Rama
in the Ramayana
Ramayana
and Krishna
Krishna
in the Mahabharata
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Kamarupa
AncientDavaka KamarupaMedievalAhom Kingdom Chutiya Kingdom Kachari Kingdom Kamata Kingdom Baro-BhuyanColonialColonial Assam Assam
Assam
ProvincePeopleAhoms Assamese Brahmins Muslims Assamese Sikhs[3]Kalitas Kaibartas SutiyasTribes Bodos
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Svarga
Svarga
Svarga
(Sanskrit: स्वर्ग) also known as Swarga or Svarga Loka, is one of the eight higher (Vyahrtis) lokas (esotericism plane) in Hindu cosmology. The eight lokas consist of Bhu loka, Bhuvar loka, Swarga loka, Mahar loka, Jana loka, Tapa loka, Satyaloka
Satyaloka
(Brahmaloka), and the highest Goloka.[1] Svarga
Svarga
Loka
Loka
is a set of heavenly worlds located on and above Mt. Meru where the righteous live in paradise before their next incarnation. During each pralaya (the great dissolution), the first three realms, Bhu loka (Earth), Bhuvar loka and Swarga loka are destroyed
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Indra
Indra
Indra
(/ˈɪndrə/, Sanskrit: इन्द्र) is a Vedic deity in Hinduism,[1] a guardian deity in Buddhism,[2] and the king of the highest heaven called Saudharmakalpa in Jainism.[3] His mythologies and powers are similar, though not identical to those of the Indo-European deities such as Zeus, Jupiter, Perun, Thor, and Odin (Wotan).[1][4][5] In the Vedas, Indra
Indra
is the king of Svarga
Svarga
(Heaven) and the Devas. He is the god of the heavens, lightning, thunder, storms, rains and river flows.[6] Indra
Indra
is the most referred to deity in the Rigveda.[7] He is celebrated for his powers, and the one who kills the great symbolic evil (Asura) named Vritra
Vritra
who obstructs human prosperity and happiness
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Junior Wives Of Krishna
Besides eight principal queens,[1] the Hindu god Krishna, an avatar of the god Vishnu
Vishnu
in the Dwapara Yuga
Dwapara Yuga
(epoch), is described to have many unnamed junior wives. Their number is mentioned as 16,000 or 16,100 in different scriptures. Krishna
Krishna
accepted them as his wives upon their insistence to save themselves from the society who saw them as slaves of the demon king Narakasura. The chief amongst them is sometimes called Rohini. When Krishna
Krishna
slew Narakasura, he accepted all the captive women upon their insistence to safeguard their dignity
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Hindu
ArtsBharatanatyam Kathak Kathakali Kuchipudi Manipuri Mohiniyattam Odissi Sattriya Bhagavata Mela Yakshagana Dandiya Raas Carnatic musicRites of passageGarbhadhana Pumsavana Simantonayana Jatakarma Namakarana Nishkramana Annaprashana Chudakarana Karnavedha Vidyarambha Upanayana Keshanta Ritushuddhi Samavartana Vivaha AntyeshtiAshrama DharmaAshrama: Brahmacharya Grihastha Vanaprastha SannyasaFestivalsDiwali Holi Shivaratri Navaratri Durga
Durga
Puja Ramlila Vijayadashami-Dussehra


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Deva (Hinduism)
Deva (/ˈdeɪvə/; Sanskrit: देव, Devá) means "heavenly, divine, anything of excellence", and is also one of the terms for a deity in Hinduism.[1] Deva is a masculine term; the feminine equivalent is devi. In the earliest Vedic literature, all supernatural beings are called Asuras.[2][3] The concepts and legends evolve in ancient Indian literature, and by the late Vedic period, benevolent supernatural beings are referred to as Deva-Asuras
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Krishna
Krishna
Krishna
(/ˈkrɪʃnə/,[8] [ˈkr̩ʂɳə] ( listen); Sanskrit: कृष्ण, translit. Kṛṣṇa) is a major deity in Hinduism. He is worshiped as the eighth avatar of the god Vishnu
Vishnu
and also as the supreme God
God
in his own right.[9] He is the god of compassion, tenderness, and love in Hinduism,[1][2] and is one of the most popular and widely revered among Indian divinities.[10] Krishna's birthday is celebrated every year by Hindus on Janmashtami according to the lunisolar Hindu
Hindu
calendar, which falls in late August or early September of the Gregorian calendar.[11] Krishna
Krishna
is also known by numerous names, such as Govinda, Mukunda, Madhusudhana, Vasudeva, and Makhan chor. The anecdotes and narratives of Krishna's life are generally titled as Krishna
Krishna
Leela
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Satyabhama
Satyabhama
Satyabhama
is the second most important wife of the God Krishna- the avatar of the god Vishnu. The third wife of Krishna
Krishna
after Rukmini
Rukmini
and Jambavanti, Satyabhama
Satyabhama
is believed to be an avatar of Bhumī Devī, the Goddess of Earth
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