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Icaria
Icaria, also spelled Ikaria (Greek: Ικαρία), is a Greek island in the Aegean Sea, 10 nautical miles (19 km) southwest of Samos. According to tradition, it derives its name from Icarus, the son of Daedalus
Daedalus
in Greek mythology, who was believed to have fallen into the sea nearby. Administratively, Icaria
Icaria
forms a separate municipality within the Ikaria regional unit, which is part of the North Aegean
North Aegean
region
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Dionysos, Greece
Dionysos (Greek: Διόνυσος) is a town and a municipality in northeastern Attica, Greece. The seat of the municipality is the town Agios Stefanos.[2]Contents1 Geography 2 Municipality 3 History 4 Τhe Dionysia festival 5 Culture 6 Gallery 7 Notable people 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksGeography[edit] Dionysos is situated on the northeastern slopes of the forested Penteliko Mountains. It is 5 km south of Agios Stefanos, 9 km west of Nea Makri, on the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
coast, and 18 km northeast of Athens city centre. Its built-up area is continuous with those of the neighbouring suburbs Drosia
Drosia
and Rodopoli
Rodopoli
to the northwest
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Delian League
The Delian League, founded in 478 BC,[1] was an association of Greek city-states, members numbering between 150,[2] 173,[3] to 330 [4] under the leadership of Athens, whose purpose was to continue fighting the Persian Empire
Empire
after the Greek victory in the Battle of Plataea
Battle of Plataea
at the end of the Second Persian invasion of Greece. The League's modern[5] name derives from its official meeting place, the island of Delos, where congresses were held in the temple and where the treasury stood until, in a symbolic gesture,[6] Pericles
Pericles
moved it to Athens in 454 BC.[7] Shortly after its inception, Athens began to use the League's navy for its own purposes – which led to its naming by historians as the Athenian Empire. This behavior frequently led to conflict between Athens and the less powerful members of the League
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European Otter
The Eurasian otter
Eurasian otter
( Lutra
Lutra
lutra), also known as the European otter, Eurasian river otter, common otter, and Old World otter, is a semiaquatic mammal native to Eurasia. The most widely distributed member of the otter subfamily (Lutrinae) of the weasel family (Mustelidae), it is found in the waterways and coasts of Europe, many parts of Asia, and parts of northern Africa. The Eurasian otter
Eurasian otter
has a diet mainly of fish, and is strongly territorial. It is endangered in parts of its range, but recovering in others.Contents1 Description 2 Range and habitat 3 Diet 4 Behaviour and reproduction 5 Conservation 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksDescription[edit] The Eurasian otter
Eurasian otter
is a typical species of the otter subfamily. Brown above and cream below, these long, slender creatures are well-equipped for their aquatic habits
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Jumping Spider
See List of Salticidae genera.Diversity600+ genera, 5000+ speciesThe jumping spider family (Salticidae) contains over 600 described genera and more than 5800 described species,[1] making it the largest family of spiders with about 13% of all species.[2] Jumping spiders have some of the best vision among arthropods and use it in courtship, hunting, and navigation. Although they normally move unobtrusively and fairly slowly, most species are capable of very agile jumps, notably when hunting, but sometimes in response to sudden threats or crossing long gaps. Both their book lungs and tracheal system are well-developed, and they use both systems (bimodal breathing). Jumping spiders are generally recognized by their eye pattern
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European Green Toad
The European green toad
European green toad
( Bufo
Bufo
viridis) is a species of toad found in mainland Europe. It lives in many habitats, including steppes, mountainous areas, semi-deserts, and urban areas. The species comprises at least 12 major evolutionary lineages, and there are variations in the color and pattern of this toad across its range. The spots on the back vary from green to dark brown and sometimes red spots appear, too. The underside is white or very lightly coloured. Mating call
Mating call
of the European green toadThe European green toad
European green toad
will change colour in response to heat and light changes
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Mediterranean Climate
A Mediterranean climate
Mediterranean climate
/ˌmɛdɪtəˈreɪniən/ or dry summer climate, is the climate typical of areas in the Mediterranean Basin. The Mediterranean climate
Mediterranean climate
is usually characterized by rainy winters and dry, warm to hot summers. While the climate receives its name from the Mediterranean Sea, an area where this climate is commonplace, it is also present in other areas of the planet, although with variations in the distribution of temperatures
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Neolithic
farming, animal husbandry pottery, metallurgy, wheel circular ditches, henges, megaliths Neolithic
Neolithic
religion↓ ChalcolithicThe Neolithic
Neolithic
(/ˌniːəˈlɪθɪk/ ( listen)[1]) was a period in the development of human technology, beginning about 10,200 BC, according to the ASPRO chronology, in some parts of the Middle East, and later in other parts of the world[2] and ending between 4500 and 2000 BC. Traditionally considered the last part of the Stone Age
Stone Age
or The New Stone Age, the Neolithic
Neolithic
followed the terminal Holocene
Holocene
Epipaleolithic period and commenced with the beginning of farming, which produced the " Neolithic
Neolithic
Revolution"
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Pelasgians
The name Pelasgians
Pelasgians
(/pəˈlæzdʒiənz, -dʒənz, -ɡiənz/; Ancient Greek: Πελασγοί, Pelasgoí, singular: Πελασγός, Pelasgós) was used by classical Greek writers to either refer to populations that were the ancestors/forerunners of the Greeks,[1][2] or to signify all pre-classical indigenes of Greece. In general, "Pelasgian" has come to mean more broadly all the indigenous inhabitants of the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
region and their cultures, "a hold-all term for any ancient, primitive and presumably indigenous people in the Greek world".[3] During the classical period, enclaves under that name survived in several locations of mainland Greece, Crete, and other regions of the Aegean
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Miletus
Miletus
Miletus
(/maɪˈliːtəs/; Ancient Greek: Μίλητος, translit. Milētos; Hittite transcription Millawanda or Milawata (exonyms); Latin: Miletus; Turkish: Milet) was an ancient Greek city on the western coast of Anatolia, near the mouth of the Maeander
Maeander
River in ancient Caria.[3][4][5] Its ruins are located near the modern village of Balat in Aydın
Aydın
Province, Turkey
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Polycrates
Polycrates
Polycrates
(/pəˈlɪkrəˌtiːz/; Greek: Πολυκράτης, in English usually Polycrates
Polycrates
but sometimes Polykrates), son of Aeaces, was the tyrant of Samos
Samos
from c. 538 BC to 522 BC. He had a reputation as both a fierce warrior and an enlightened tyrant.Contents1 Establishment of his power 2 Religious and cultural activities 3 Polycrates' fate 4 Polycrates
Polycrates
in later culture 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksEstablishment of his power[edit] Polycrates
Polycrates
took power during a festival of Hera
Hera
with his brothers Pantagnotus and Syloson, but soon had Pantagnotus killed and exiled Syloson to take full control for himself
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Artemis
Artemis
Artemis
(/ˈɑːrtɪmɪs/; Greek: Ἄρτεμις Artemis, Attic Greek: [ár.te.mis]) was one of the most widely venerated of the Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
deities. Her Roman equivalent is Diana.[2] Some scholars[3] believe that the name, and indeed the goddess herself, was originally pre-Greek.[4] Homer
Homer
refers to her as Artemis
Artemis
Agrotera, Potnia Theron: " Artemis
Artemis
of the wildland, Mistress of Animals".[5] The Arcadians believed she was the daughter of Demeter.[6] In the classical period of Greek mythology, Artemis
Artemis
was often described as the daughter of Zeus
Zeus
and Leto, and the twin sister of Apollo
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Modern Regions Of Greece
The administrative regions of Greece
Greece
(Greek: περιφέρειες, peripheries) are the country's thirteen first-level administrative entities, each comprising several second-level units, originally prefectures and, since 2011, regional units.Contents1 History 2 List of administrative regions 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] The current regions were established in July 1986 (the Presidential Decree officially establishing them was signed in 1987), by decision of then-Interior Minister Menios Koutsogiorgas as a second-level administrative entities, complementing the prefectures (Law 1622/1986).[1] Before 1986, there was a traditional division into broad historical–geographical regions (γεωγραφικά διαμερίσματα), which, however, was often arbitrary; not all of the pre-1986 traditional historical-geographic regions had official administrative bodies
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Bull (mythology)
The worship of the Sacred Bull
Bull
throughout the ancient world is most familiar to the Western world in the biblical episode of the idol of the Golden Calf. The Golden Calf after being made by the Hebrew people in the wilderness of Sinai, was rejected and destroyed by Moses
Moses
and the Hebrew people after Moses' time upon Mount Sinai
Sinai
(Book of Exodus). In Sumerian mythology, Marduk
Marduk
is the "bull of Utu". In Hinduism, Shiva's steed is Nandi, the Bull. The sacred bull survives in the constellation Taurus
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Temenos
Temenos (Greek: τέμενος; plural: τεμένη, temene)[1] is a piece of land cut off and assigned as an official domain, especially to kings and chiefs, or a piece of land marked off from common uses and dedicated to a god, a sanctuary, holy grove or holy precinct: the Pythian race-course is called a temenos, the sacred valley of the Nile is the Νείλοιο πῖον τέμενος Κρονίδα ("the rich temenos of Cronides
Cronides
by the Nile"),[1][2] the Acropolis of Athens is the ἱερὸν τέμενος ("the holy temenos"; of Pallas).[1][3] The word derives from the Greek verb τέμνω (temnō), "to cut".[4][5] The earliest attested form of the word is the Mycenaean Greek
Mycenaean Greek
𐀳𐀕𐀜, te-me-no, written in Linear B syllabic script.[6] The concept of temenos arose in classical Mediterranean
Mediterranean
cultures as an area reserved for worship of the gods
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Artemis Tauropolos
ΚΑΙΣΑΡ / ΘΕΟΥ ΥΙΟΣR: Artemis
Artemis
Tauropolos riding bull AMΦΙΠOΛEΙΤΩΝbronze coin struck by Augustus
Augustus
in Amphipolis
Amphipolis
31 - 27 BC; ref.: RPC 1626It has been suggested that this article be merged into Artemis#Epithets. (Discuss) Proposed since May 2017. Artemis
Artemis
Tauropolos, in ancient Greece, was an epithet for the goddess Artemis, variously interpreted as "worshipped at Tauris", "pulled by a yoke of bulls", or "hunting bull goddess". A statue of Artemis "Tauropolos" in her temple at Brauron
Brauron
in Attica was supposed to have been brought from the Taurians by Iphigenia
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