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Giotto
Giotto
Giotto
di Bondone[1] (c. 1267 – January 8, 1337),[2][3] known mononymously as Giotto
Giotto
(Italian: [ˈdʒɔtto]) and Latinised as Giottus, was an Italian painter and architect from Florence
Florence
during the Late Middle Ages
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Siena
Siena
Siena
(Italian pronunciation: [ˈsjɛːna] ( listen); in English sometimes spelled Sienna; Latin: Sena Iulia) is a city in Tuscany, Italy
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Mononymously
A mononymous person is an individual who is known and addressed by a single name, or mononym.[1][2] In some cases, that name has been selected by the individual, who may have originally been given a polynym ("multiple name"). In other cases, it has been determined by the custom of the country[3] or by some interested segment. In the case of historical figures, it may be the only one of the individual's names that has survived and is still known today.Contents1 Antiquity 2 Medieval uses2.1 Europe 2.2 The Americas3 Post-medieval uses3.1 France 3.2 Other Europe 3.3 North America4 Royalty 5 Modern times5.1 Mononym-normal 5.2 Asia 5.3 The West6 Gallery 7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External linksAntiquity[edit]NarmerThe structure of persons' names has varied across time and geography. In some societies, individuals have been mononymous, receiving only a single name
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Diocesan Museum
A diocesan museum is a museum for an ecclesiastical diocese, a geographically-based division of the Christian Church. Austria:Evangelical Diocesan Museum, Burgenland in the Evangelical Prayer House in the Mönchhof Village Museum Diocesan Museum, Graz, Styria Gurk Treasury, Carinthia[1] Evangelical Diocesan Museum, Fresach
Fresach
in Fresach, Carinthia Diocesan Museum, Linz, Upper Austria[2] Evangelical Diocesan Museum, Styria
Styria
in Murau Cathedral Museum
Museum
Salzburg, Salzburg
Salzburg
state (Diocesan and Cathedral Chapter collections) Diocesan Museum, St
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Crucifixion
Crucifixion
Crucifixion
is a method of capital punishment in which the victim is tied or nailed to a large wooden beam and left to hang for several days until eventual death from exhaustion and asphyxiation.[1][2][3] The crucifixion of Jesus is a central narrative in Christianity, and the cross (sometimes depicting Jesus nailed onto it) is the main religious symbol for many Christian
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Napoleon
Napoléon Bonaparte (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a French statesman and military leader who rose to prominence during the French Revolution and led several successful campaigns during the French Revolutionary Wars. As Napoleon, he was Emperor of the French
Emperor of the French
from 1804 until 1814, and again briefly in 1815 during the Hundred Days. Napoleon
Napoleon
dominated European and global affairs for more than a decade while leading France
France
against a series of coalitions in the Napoleonic Wars. He won most of these wars and the vast majority of his battles, building a large empire that ruled over continental Europe before its final collapse in 1815. He is considered one of the greatest commanders in history, and his wars and campaigns are studied at military schools worldwide
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Gothic Architecture
Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is an architectural style that flourished in Europe
Europe
during the High and Late Middle Ages. It evolved from Romanesque architecture
Romanesque architecture
and was succeeded by Renaissance
Renaissance
architecture. Originating in 12th century France
France
and lasting into the 16th century, Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
was known during the period as Opus Francigenum ("French work") with the term Gothic first appearing during the later part of the Renaissance. Its characteristics include the pointed arch, the ribbed vault (which evolved from the joint vaulting of Romanesque architecture) and the flying buttress. Gothic architecture
Gothic architecture
is most familiar as the architecture of many of the great cathedrals, abbeys and churches of Europe
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Architect
An architect is a person who plans, designs, and reviews the construction of buildings. To practice architecture means to provide services in connection with the design of buildings and the space within the site surrounding the buildings, that have as their principal purpose human occupancy or use.[1] Etymologically, architect derives from the Latin architectus, which derives from the Greek (arkhi-, chief + tekton, builder), i.e., chief builder.[2] Professionally, an architect's decisions affect public safety, and thus an architect must undergo specialized training consisting of advanced education and a practicum (or internship) for practical experience to earn a license to practice architecture
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Latinisation Of Names
Latinisation (also spelled Latinization[1]: see spelling differences) is the practice of rendering a non- Latin
Latin
name (or word) in a Latin style.[1] It is commonly found with historical personal names, with toponyms and in the standard binomial nomenclature of the life sciences. It goes further than romanisation, which is the transliteration of a word to the Latin
Latin
alphabet from another script (e.g. Cyrillic). This was often done in the classical to emulate Latin
Latin
authors, or to present a more impressive image. In a scientific context, the main purpose of Latinisation may be to produce a name which is internationally consistent. Latinisation may be carried out by:transforming the name into Latin
Latin
sounds (e.g. Geber for Jabir), or adding Latinate suffixes to the end of a name (e.g
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Basilica Of St. John Lateran
The Cathedral
Cathedral
of the Most Holy Savior and of Saints John the Baptist and the Evangelist in the Lateran, (Italian: Santissimo Salvatore e Santi Giovanni Battista ed Evangelista in Laterano) - also known as the Papal
Papal
Archbasilica of St. John [in] Lateran, St. John Lateran, or the Lateran Basilica
Basilica
- is the cathedral church of Rome, Italy
Italy
and therefore houses the cathedra, or ecclesiastical seat, of the Bishop of Rome
Rome
(Pope). It is the oldest and highest ranking of the four papal major basilicas, giving it the unique title of "archbasilica"
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Republic Of Florence
The Republic of Florence, also known as the Florentine Republic (Italian: Repubblica Fiorentina, pronounced [reˈpubblika fjorenˈtina]), was a medieval and early modern state that was centered on the Italian city of Florence
Florence
in Tuscany.[1][2] The republic originated in 1115, when the Florentine people rebelled against the Margraviate of Tuscany
Tuscany
upon the death of Matilda of Tuscany, a woman who controlled vast territories that included Florence. The Florentines formed a commune in her successors' place.[3] The republic was ruled by a council known as the Signoria of Florence. The signoria was chosen by the gonfaloniere (titular ruler of the city), who was elected every two months by Florentine guild members. The republic had a checkered history of coups and counter-coups against various factions. The Medici
Medici
faction gained governance of the city in 1434 under Cosimo de' Medici
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Architecture
Architecture
Architecture
is both the process and the product of planning, designing, and constructing buildings or any other structures.[3] Architectural works, in the material form of buildings, are often perceived as cultural symbols and as works of art. Historical civilizations are often identified with their surviving architectural achievements. The term architecture is also used metaphorically to refer to the design of organizations and other abstract concepts
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Gothic Art
Gothic art
Gothic art
was a style of medieval art that developed in Northern France out of Romanesque art
Romanesque art
in the 12th century AD, led by the concurrent development of Gothic architecture. It spread to all of Western Europe, and much of Southern and Central Europe, never quite effacing more classical styles in Italy. In the late 14th century, the sophisticated court style of International Gothic
International Gothic
developed, which continued to evolve until the late 15th century. In many areas, especially Germany, Late Gothic art
Gothic art
continued well into the 16th century, before being subsumed into Renaissance
Renaissance
art. Primary media in the Gothic period included sculpture, panel painting, stained glass, fresco and illuminated manuscripts
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List Of Italian Painters
Following is a list of Italian painters (in alphabetical order) who are notable for their art.ContentsA B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y ZA[edit] Niccolò dell'Abbate
Niccolò dell'Abbate
(1509/12–1571) Giuseppe Abbati
Giuseppe Abbati
(1836–1868) Angiolo Achini (1850–1930) Pietro Adami (c. 1730) Livio Agresti
Livio Agresti
(1508–1580) Giorgio Matteo Aicardi (1891–1985) Francesco Albani
Francesco Albani
(1578–1660) Giacomo Alberelli (1600–1650) Mariotto Albertinelli
Mariotto Albertinelli
(1474–1515) Alessandro Allori
Alessandro Allori
(1535–1607) Cristofano Allori
Cristofano Allori
(1577–1621) Marco Almaviva
Marco Almaviva
(b
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Painting
Painting
Painting
is the practice of applying paint, pigment, color or other medium[1] to a solid surface (support base). The medium is commonly applied to the base with a brush, but other implements, such as knives, sponges, and airbrushes, can be used. Painting
Painting
is a mode of creative expression, and can be done in numerous forms. Drawing, gesture (as in gestural painting), composition, narration (as in narrative art), or abstraction (as in abstract art), among other aesthetic modes, may serve to manifest the expressive and conceptual intention of the practitioner.[2] Paintings can be naturalistic and representational (as in a still life or landscape painting), photographic, abstract, narrative, symbolistic (as in Symbolist art), emotive (as in Expressionism), or political in nature (as in Artivism). A portion of the history of painting in both Eastern and Western art is dominated by spiritual motifs and ideas
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Duccio
Duccio
Duccio
di Buoninsegna (Italian: [ˈduttʃo di ˌbwɔninˈseɲɲa]; c. 1255–1260 – c. 1318–1319) was an Italian painter active in Siena, Tuscany, in the late 13th and early 14th centuries. He was hired throughout his life to complete many important works in government and religious buildings around Italy. Duccio
Duccio
is credited with creating the painting styles of Trecento
Trecento
and the Sienese school, and also contributed significantly to the Sienese Gothic style.Contents1 Biography 2 Artistic career 3 Style 4 Followers of Duccio 5 Gallery 6 Known surviving works 7 References 8 Sources 9 Further reading 10 External linksBiography[edit] Although much is still unconfirmed about Duccio
Duccio
and his life, there is more documentation of him and his life than of other Italian painters of his time
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