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Gemmatimonadetes
The Gemmatimonadetes are a phylum of bacteria created for the type species Gemmatimonas aurantiaca. This bacterium makes up about 2% of soil bacterial communities and has been identified as one of the top nine phyla found in soils; yet, there are currently only six cultured isolates.[1] Gemmatimonadetes have been found in a variety of arid soils, such as grassland, prairie, and pasture soil, as well as eutrophic lake sediments and alpine soils
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Taxonomy (biology)
Taxonomy (from Ancient Greek τάξις (taxis), meaning 'arrangement', and -νομία (-nomia), meaning 'method') is the science of defining and naming groups of biological organisms on the basis of shared characteristics. Organisms are grouped together into taxa (singular: taxon) and these groups are given a taxonomic rank; groups of a given rank can be aggregated to form a super-group of higher rank, thus creating a taxonomic hierarchy. The principal ranks in modern use are domain, kingdom, phylum (division is sometimes used in botany in place of phylum), class, order, family, genus and species
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Rhodobacterales
Rhodobacterales are an order of the Alphaproteobacteria.[1] Gene transfer agents are viruslike elements produced by Rhodobacterales which transfer DNA and may be an important factor in their evolution.[2]Contents1 References 2 Further reading2.1 Scientific journals 2.2 Scientific books3 External linksReferences[edit]^ See the NCBI webpage on Rhodobacterales. Data extracted from the "NCBI taxonomy resources". National Center for Biotechnology Information. Retrieved 2007-03-19.  ^ Maxmen, A. (2010). "Virus-like particles speed bacterial evolution". Nature. doi:10.1038/news.2010.507. Further reading[edit] Scientific journals[edit]Lee KB, Liu CT, Anzai Y, Kim H, Aono T, Oyaizu H (2005). "The hierarchical system of the 'Alphaproteobacteria': description of Hyphomonadaceae fam. nov., Xanthobacteraceae fam. nov. and Erythrobacteraceae fam. nov". Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol. 55 (Pt 5): 1907–1919
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Herpetosiphonales
Herpetosiphonaceae Herpetosiphonales is one of two orders of bacteria in the class Chloroflexi.[1] See also[edit]List of bacterial ordersReferences[edit]^ Garrity, George M. (2001). Bergey's manual of systematic bacteriology (2nd ed.). New York: Springer. pp. 427–446. ISBN 978-0-387-21609-6. External links[edit] Wikispecies
Wikispecies
has information related to HerpetosiphonalesTaxon identifiersWd: Q16910608 EoL: 7814 GBIF: 573 iNaturalist: 152332 ITIS: 956232 NCBI: 189772 WoRMS: 564347This bacteria-related article is a stub
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Thermophile
A thermophile is an organism—a type of extremophile—that thrives at relatively high temperatures, between 41 and 122 °C (106 and 252 °F).[1][2] Many thermophiles are archaea
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Caulobacterales
Asticcacaulis Brevundimonas Caulobacter Phenylobacterium Caulobacteraceae is a family of proteobacteria, given its own order (Caulobacterales) within the alpha subgroup.[1] Like all Proteobacteria, the Caulobacteraceae are gram-negative.[1] Caulobacteraceae includes the genera Asticcacaulis, Brevundimonas, Phenylobacterium and Caulobacter.[2] The typespecies Caulobacter
Caulobacter
gives its name also to the recently proposed subclass, the Caulobacteridae, which includes the orders Caulobacterales, Parvularculales, Rhizobiales, Rhodobacterales, Rhodospirillales, Sneathiellales, Sphingomonadales, Kiloniellales, Kordiimonadales and controversially the Holosporales.[3] References[edit]^ a b Garrity, George M.; Brenner, Don J.; Krieg, Noel R.; Staley, James T. (eds.) (2005)
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Magnetococcales
Magnetococcus marinus is a species of Alphaproteobacteria
Alphaproteobacteria
that has the peculiar ability to form a structure called a magnetosome, a membrane encased single-magnetic-domain mineral crystals formed by biomineralisation, which allows the cells to orientate along the Earth’s geomagnetic field.[1] It is a basal group in the Alphaproteobacteria.Schematic ribosomal RNA phylogeny of Alphaproteobacteria 
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Parvularculales
Parvularcula bermudensis is a marine bacterium which was identified in 2003 in the western Sargasso Sea
Sargasso Sea
in the Atlantic Ocean. It forms a deep branch in the Alpha Proteobacteria, distinct from the other orders. Parvularcula isolates are Gram-negative, strictly aerobic, chemoheterotrophic, slightly motile short rods with a single flagellum. Colonies on marine agar are very small (0·3–0·8 mm in diameter), yellowish-brown and very hard. They are oxidase positive and catalase negative.[2] References[edit]^ ."Parvularcula". LPSN. Retrieved 26 January 2018.  ^ Cho, J.-C (2003). " Parvularcula bermudensis gen. nov., sp. nov., a marine bacterium that forms a deep branch in the -Proteobacteria". International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology. 53 (4): 1031
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Rhizobiales
HyphomicrobialesThe Rhizobiales
Rhizobiales
are an order of Gram-negative
Gram-negative
Alphaproteobacteria. The rhizobia, which fix nitrogen and are symbiotic with plant roots, appear in several different families. The four families Bradyrhizobiaceae, Hyphomicrobiaceae, Phyllobacteriaceae, and Rhizobiaceae contain at least six genera of nitrogen-fixing, legume-nodulating, microsymbiotic bacteria. Examples are the genera Bradyrhizobium
Bradyrhizobium
and Rhizobium. Species of the Methylocystaceae are methanotrophs; they use methanol (CH3OH) or methane (CH4) as their sole energy and carbon sources
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Rhodospirillales
Rhodospirillaceae AcetobacteraceaeThe Rhodospirillales are an order of Proteobacteria, with two families: the Acetobacteraceae and the Rhodospirillaceae.[1] The Acetobacteraceae comprise the acetic acid bacteria, which are heterotrophic and produce acetic acid during their respiration.[2] The Rhodospirillaceae include mainly purple nonsulfur bacteria, which produce energy through photosynthesis.[2] References[edit]^ LPSN ^ a b Garrity, George M.; Brenner, Don J.; Krieg, Noel R.; Staley, James T. (eds.) (2005). Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, Volume Two: The Proteobacteria, Part C: The Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. New York, New York: Springer. ISBN 978-0-387-24145-6.Taxon identifiersWd: Q476656 EoL: 7693 EPPO: 1RHDSO GBIF: 1223 ITIS: 956263 NCBI: 204441 WoRMS: 392751This Alphaproteobacteria-related article is a stub
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Thermales
Thermales is an order of bacteria belonging to the Deinococcus–Thermus phylum.[1] They are particularly resistant to heat, and live in the benthic zone of the Gulf of Mexico.[2] References[edit]^ Fred A. Rainey; Milton S. da Costa (14 September 2015). "Thermales ord. nov". Bergey's Manual of Systematics of Archaea and Bacteria. John Wiley and Sons, Inc. doi:10.1002/9781118960608.obm00045. Archived from the original on 18 December 2016. Retrieved 18 December 2016.  ^ John W. Tunnell, Jr.; Darryl L. Felder; Sylvia A. Earle; David K. Camp, eds. (2009). "Gulf of Mexico Origin, Waters, and Biota: Biodiversity". Texas A&M University Press: 38. ISBN 9781603442695. Retrieved 18 December 2016. Taxon identifiersWd: Q7783079 EoL: 7800 EPPO: 1THRSO GBIF: 1208 iNaturalist: 152328 ITIS: 956274 NCBI: 68933 WoRMS: 564388This bacteria-related article is a stub
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Rickettsiales
Rickettsiaceae Midichloriaceae Anaplasmataceae [1]The Rickettsiales, also called rickettsias, are an order of small Alphaproteobacteria
Alphaproteobacteria
that are endosymbionts of eukaryotic cells
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Sphingomonadales
Blastomonas Citromicrobium Erythrobacter Erythromicrobium Kaistobacter Lutibacterium Novosphingobium Porphyrobacter Sandaracinobacter Sphingobium Sphingomonas Sphingopyxis Zymomonas Sphingomonadaceae are a family of the Alphaproteobacteria. An important feature is the presence of sphingolipids in the outer membrane of the cell wall.[1] The cells are ovoid or rod-shaped. Others are also pleomorphic, i.e. the cells change the shape over time. Some species are phototrophic. Sphingomonadaceae are also known by the ability of some species to degrade some aromatic compounds. This makes the bacteria of interest to environmental remediation.[2] References[edit]^ Garrity, George M.; Brenner, Don J.; Krieg, Noel R.; Staley, James T. (eds.) (2005). Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, Volume Two: The Proteobacteria, Part C: The Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. New York, New York: Springer. ISBN 978-0-387-24145-6. ^ David L. Balkwill, J
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Burkholderiales
Alcaligenaceae Burkholderiaceae Comamonadaceae Oxalobacteraceae SutterellaceaeThe Burkholderiales
Burkholderiales
are an order of Proteobacteria.[1] Like all Proteobacteria, they are Gram-negative. They include several pathogenic bacteria, including species of Burkholderia, Bordetella, and Ralstonia.[1] They also include Oxalobacter and related genera, which are unusual in using oxalic acid as their source of carbon.[1] References[edit]^ a b c George M. Garrity: Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology. 2. Auflage. Springer, New York, 2005, Vol. 2: The Proteobacteria
Proteobacteria
Part C: The Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteabacteria ISBN 0-387-24145-0External links[edit] Wikispecies
Wikispecies
has information related to Burkholderiales Burkholderiales
Burkholderiales
J.P
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Hydrogenophilales
Hydrogenophilus TepidiphilusThe Hydrogenophilaceae are a family of the Hydrogenophilalia, with two genera – Hydrogenophilus and Tepidiphilus. Like all "Proteobacteria", they are Gram-negative
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Methylophilales
Methylophilus Methylobacillus MethylovoraxThe Methylophilaceae are a family of Proteobacteria, given their own order. Like all Proteobacteria, they are Gram-negative. The cells are slightly curved or straight rod-shaped.[1] References[edit]^ Garrity, George M.; Brenner, Don J.; Krieg, Noel R.; Staley, James T. (eds.) (2005). Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, Volume Two: The Proteobacteria, Part C: The Alpha-, Beta-, Delta-, and Epsilonproteobacteria. New York, New York: Springer. pp. 354–361. ISBN 978-0-387-24145-6.External links[edit] Methylophilaceae J.P. Euzéby: List of Prokaryotic names with Standing in NomenclatureTaxon identifiersWd: Q488967 EoL: 3337 EPPO: 1MTHYF GBIF: 8929 ITIS: 956456 LPSN: methylophilaceae.html NCBI: 32011 WoRMS: 571358This Betaproteobacteria-related article is a stub
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