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Francia
Francia, also called the Kingdom of the Franks
Franks
(Latin: Regnum Francorum), or Frankish Empire
Empire
was the largest post-Roman Barbarian kingdom in Western Europe. It was ruled by the Franks
Franks
during Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. The core Frankish territories inside the Roman empire
Roman empire
were close to the Rhine
Rhine
and Maas rivers in the north. After a period where small kingdoms inter-acted with the remaining Gallo-Roman institutions to their south, a single kingdom uniting them was founded by Clovis I
Clovis I
who was crowned King of the Franks
Franks
in 496
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Western Europe
Western Europe
Europe
is the region comprising the western part of Europe. Though the term Western Europe
Europe
is commonly used, there is no commonly agreed-upon definition of the countries that it encompasses
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Basilica Of St Denis
The Basilica of Saint Denis
Denis
(French: Basilique royale de Saint-Denis, or simply Basilique Saint-Denis) is a large medieval abbey church in the city of Saint-Denis, now a northern suburb of Paris. The building is of unique importance historically and architecturally as its choir, completed in 1144, shows the first use of all of the elements of Gothic architecture. The site originated as a Gallo-Roman cemetery in late Roman times. The archeological remains still lie beneath the cathedral; the people buried there seem to have had a faith that was a mix of Christian and pre-Christian beliefs and practices.[1] Around 475 St. Genevieve purchased some land and built Saint-Denys de la Chapelle. In 636 on the orders of Dagobert I
Dagobert I
the relics of Saint Denis, a patron saint of France, were reinterred in the basilica
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Dagobert I
Dagobert I
Dagobert I
(Latin: Dagobertus; c. 603[1]/605 – 19 January 639 AD) was the king of Austrasia
Austrasia
(623–634), king of all the Franks (629–634), and king of Neustria
Neustria
and Burgundy (629–639). He was the last king of the Merovingian
Merovingian
dynasty to wield any real royal power.[3] Dagobert was the first of the Frankish kings to be buried in the royal tombs at Saint Denis Basilica.[4]Contents1 Rule in Austrasia 2 United rule 3 Rule in Neustria, from Paris 4 Marriage and children 5 Coinage and treasures under Dagobert5.1 Treasure of Dagobert 5.2 Coinage6 References 7 Sources 8 External linksRule in Austrasia[edit] Dagobert was the eldest son of Chlothar II
Chlothar II
and Haldetrude (575–604). Chlothar had reigned alone over all the Franks since 613
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List Of Countries And Dependencies By Area
This is a list of the world's countries and their dependent territories by area, ranked by total area. Entries in this list include, but are not limited to, those in the ISO 3166-1 standard, which includes sovereign states and dependent territories
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Monarchy
A monarchy is a form of government in which a group, generally a family representing a dynasty (aristocracy), embodies the country's national identity and its head, the monarch, exercises the role of sovereignty. The actual power of the monarch may vary from purely symbolic (crowned republic), to partial and restricted (constitutional monarchy), to completely autocratic (absolute monarchy). Traditionally the monarch's post is inherited and lasts until death or abdication. In contrast, elective monarchies require the monarch to be elected.[1] Both types have further variations as there are widely divergent structures and traditions defining monarchy. For example, in some[which?] elected monarchies only pedigrees are taken into account for eligibility of the next ruler, whereas many hereditary monarchies impose requirements regarding the religion, age, gender, mental capacity, etc
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Roman Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Frankish Mythology
Golden cicadas or bees with garnet inserts, discovered in the tomb of Childeric I
Childeric I
(died 482). They may have symbolised eternal life (cicadas) or longevity (the bees of Artemis).[1] Frankish mythology
Frankish mythology
comprises the mythology of the Germanic tribal confederation of the Franks, from its roots in polytheistic Germanic paganism through the inclusion of Greco-Roman components in the Early Middle Ages. This mythology flourished among the Franks
Franks
until the conversion of the Merovingian
Merovingian
king Clovis I
Clovis I
to Nicene Christianity (c. 500), though there were many Frankish Christians before that
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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French Denier
The denier (Latin: denarius; abbr. d.) or penny was a medieval coin which takes its name from the Frankish coin first issued in the late seventh century;[1] in English it is sometimes referred to as a silver penny. Its appearance represents the end of gold coinage, which, at the start of Frankish rule, had either been Byzantine or "pseudo-imperial" (minted by the Franks in imitation of Byzantine coinage)
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Meuse
The Meuse
Meuse
(/mjuːz/; French: la Meuse
Meuse
[møz]; Walloon: Moûze [muːs]) or Maas (Dutch: Maas [ˈmaːs]; Limburgish: Maos or Maas) is a major European river, rising in France
France
and flowing through Belgium
Belgium
and the Netherlands
Netherlands
before draining into the North Sea
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Paris
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Paris
Paris
(French pronunciation: ​[paʁi] ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city in France, with an administrative-limits area of 105 square kilometres (41 square miles) and an official population of 2,206,488 (2015).[5] The city is a commune and department, and the heart of the 12,012-square-kilo
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Germania
Germania
Germania
(/dʒərˈmeɪniə/; Latin: [ɡɛrˈmaː.ni.a]) was the Roman term for the geographical region in north-central Europe inhabited mainly by Germanic peoples. It extended from the Danube
Danube
in the south to the Baltic Sea, and from the Rhine
Rhine
in the west to the Vistula. The Roman portions formed two provinces of the Empire, Germania Inferior
Germania Inferior
to the north (present-day Netherlands, Belgium, and western Germany), and Germania Superior
Germania Superior
to the south (Switzerland, southwestern Germany, and eastern France). Germania
Germania
was inhabited mostly by Germanic tribes, but also Celts, Balts, Scythians
Scythians
and later on Early Slavs. The population mix changed over time by assimilation, and especially by migration
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in the area around Rome, known as Latium.[4] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language in Italy, and subsequently throughout the western Roman Empire. Latin
Latin
has contributed many words to the English language. In particular, Latin
Latin
(and Ancient Greek) roots are used in English descriptions of theology, the sciences, medicine, and law. By the late Roman Republic
Roman Republic
(75 BC), Old Latin
Old Latin
had been standardised into Classical Latin
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Frankenstein Castle
Frankenstein
Frankenstein
Castle (German: Burg Frankenstein) is a hilltop castle in the Odenwald
Odenwald
overlooking the city of Darmstadt
Darmstadt
in Germany
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Seine
The Seine
Seine
(/seɪn/ SAYN; French: La Seine, pronounced [la sɛːn]) is a 777-kilometre-long (483 mi) river and an important commercial waterway within the Paris Basin
Paris Basin
in the north of France. It rises at Source-Seine, 30 kilometres (19 mi) northwest of Dijon in northeastern France
France
in the Langres
Langres
plateau, flowing through Paris and into the English Channel
English Channel
at Le Havre
Le Havre
(and Honfleur
Honfleur
on the left bank).[1] It is navigable by ocean-going vessels as far as Rouen, 120 kilometres (75 mi) from the sea
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