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Setswana

The Tswana language (Setswana) is a Bantu language spoken in Southern Africa by about 8,2 million people.[1] It is a Bantu language belonging to the Niger–Congo language family within the Sotho-Tswana branch of Zone S (S.30), and is closely related to the Northern Sotho and Southern Sotho languages, as well as the Kgalagadi language and the Lozi language.[4] Setswana is an official language and lingua franca of Botswana and South Africa. Tswana-speakers are found in the north-west of South Africa, where four million people speak the language. An urbanised variety, which is part slang and not the formal Setswana, is known as Pretoria Sotho, and is the principal unique language of the city of Pretoria. It is a mixture of all Sotho languages. The three South African provinces with the most speakers are Gauteng (circa 11%), Northern Cape, and North West (over 70%)
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Flag Of Botswana
The national flag of Botswana (Setswana: folaga ya Botswana) consists of a light blue field cut horizontally in the centre by a black stripe with a thin white frame. Adopted in 1966 to replace the Union Jack, it has been the flag of the Republic of Botswana since the country gained independence that year.[1] It is one of the few African flags that utilises neither the colours of the Pan-Africanist movement nor the colours of the country's leading political party.[2] In 1885, Bechuanaland became a protectorate of the United Kingdom within its colonial empire
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Art Of Botswana
The visual art of Botswana has varied among different ethnic group and throughout history. Historically it has fallen into two main categories: that of the San peoples (also known as the Bushmen) and that of the Bantu-derived peoples such as the Batswana. The first is of greater antiquity in origin, and includes decoration of many of the devices and equipment the San needed for desert existence. Items such as ostrich shells, clay water filters, animal skins, arrows, bows and pots often received added decoration by way of incised or relief decoration, imprinted pottery decoration, beading and carving. These tribes also carved art objects that had no other function, most often of animals. A more ancient art is that of San rock art, for which the San are justifiably famous: right across the South-East African region their ancestors left dynamic paintings on rock faces and cave walls, executed in unknown and highly resilient pigments that have lasted millennia
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Ethnic Groups In Algeria
Ethnic groups in Algeria include Arab-Berbers, who represent 99% of the population, though according to the The World Factbook "although almost all Algerians are Berber in origin (not Arab), only a minority identify themselves as primarily Berber, about 15% of the total population".[2] Berbers are an indigenous ethnic group of Algeria. Berber linguistic groups include speakers of Central Atlas Tamazight, Chaouis, Hassaniya Arabic, Kabyle, Taznatit, Tumzabt,[3]Chenouas and Tuaregs. Algeria also has a minority population of Europeans that represents less than 1% of the population.[2] The minority European population is predominantly of French, Spanish, and Italian descent.[4] and have interacted with Phoenicians and Romans for centuries
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History Of Botswana
The Batswana, a term also used to denote all citizens of Botswana, refers to the country's major ethnic group (called the Tswana in Southern Africa). Prior to European contact, the Batswana lived as herders and farmers under tribal rule. In October 2019, researchers reported that Botswana was the birthplace of all modern humans about 200,000 years ago.[1][2] Sometime between 200-500 AD, the Bantu-speaking people who were living in the Katanga area (today part of the DRC and Zambia) crossed the Limpopo River, entering the area today known as South Africa as part of the Bantu expansion.[3] There were 2 broad waves of immigration to South Africa; Nguni and Sotho-Tswana
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