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Emperor
An emperor (through Old French
Old French
empereor from Latin imperator[1]) is a monarch, usually the sovereign ruler of an empire or another type of imperial realm. Empress, the female equivalent, may indicate an emperor's wife (empress consort), mother (empress dowager), or a woman who rules in her own right (empress regnant). Emperors are generally recognized to be of a higher honour and rank than kings. In Europe
Europe
the title of Emperor
Emperor
has been used since the Middle Ages, considered in those times equal or almost equal in dignity to that of Pope, due to the latter's position as visible head of the Church and spiritual leader of the Catholic part of Western Europe
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Emperor (other)
Disambiguation usually refers to word-sense disambiguation, the process of identifying which meaning of a word is used in context. Disambiguation may also refer to:Sentence boundary disambiguation, the problem in natural language processing of deciding where sentences begin and end Syntactic disambiguation, the problem of resolving syntactic ambiguity Memory disambiguation, a set of microprocessor execution techniquesMusic[edit]Ø (Disambiguation), a 2010 album by Underoath Disambiguation (Pandelis Karayorgis album), a 2002 album by Pandelis Karayorgis and Mat ManeriSee also[edit]Ambiguity, an attribute of any concept, idea, statement or claim whose meaning, intention or interpretation cannot be definitively resolvedThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Disambiguation. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Old French
Old French
Old French
(franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France
France
from the 8th century to the 14th century. In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc or Occitan language
Occitan language
in the south of France
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Ridder (title)
Ridder ([ˈrɪdər]; English: "Knight") is a noble title in the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Belgium. Traditionally it denotes the second lowest rank within the nobility, standing below Baron, but above the untitled nobility (Jonkheer) in these countries. "Ridder" is a literal translation of Latin Eques and originally meant "horseman" or "rider". For its historical association with warfare and the landed gentry in the Middle Ages, it can be considered roughly equal to the titles of "Knight" or "Baronet". In the Netherlands
Netherlands
and Belgium
Belgium
no female equivalent exists. The collective term for its holders in a certain area as an executive and legislative assembly is named the Ridderschap (e.g
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Latin Language
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Empress (other)
An empress is a female imperial monarch, or the wife of an imperial monarch; written with a capital, Empress is used as the title of an empress, placed before her name – often just the given name. Empress or The Empress can further refer to:Contents1 People 2 Biology 3 Buildings 4 Computers 5 Film and literature 6 Places 7 Ships 8 Other usesPeople[edit]Empress of Japan, empress consort to the current reigning emperor. Empress Schuck (born 1993), Filipina actress and commercial modelBiology[edit]A number of brush-footed butterflies in the subfamily Apaturinae:Empress, Sasakia funebris Empress Antonia, Asterocampa celtis
Asterocampa celtis
antonia, a subspecies of Asterocampa celtis Empress Leilia, Asterocampa leilia, a species in the genus Asterocampa Empress Flora, Asterocampa clyton
Asterocampa clyton
flora, a subspecies of Asterocampa clyton Empress Louisa, A. c
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Esquire
Esquire
Esquire
(British English: /ɪˈskwaɪə/;[1] American English: /ˈɛsˌkwaɪr/ or /ɪˈskwaɪr/;[2] abbreviated Esq.)[3] is usually a courtesy title. In the United Kingdom, Esquire
Esquire
historically was a title of respect accorded to men of higher social rank, particularly members of the landed gentry above the rank of gentleman and below the rank of knight. In 1826, William Blackstone
William Blackstone
reiterated that, "the title should be limited to those only who bear an office of trust under the Crown and who are styled esquires by the king in their commissions and appointments; and all, I conceive, who are once honoured by the king with the title of esquire have a right to that distinction for life."[4][5] By the early 20th century, it came to be used as a general courtesy title for any man in a formal setting, usually as a suffix to his name, as in "Todd Smith, Esq.", with no precise significance
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Viscount
A viscount (/ˈvaɪkaʊnt/ ( listen) VY-kownt, for male[1]) or viscountess (/ˈvaɪkaʊntɪs/, for female[2]) is a title used in certain European countries for a noble of varying status, but historically deemed to convey a lower-middling rank.[3] In many countries a viscount, and its historical equivalents, was a non-hereditary, administrative or judicial position, and did not develop into a hereditary title until much later.[4] In the case of French viscounts, it is customary to leave the title untranslated as vicomte [vi.kɔ̃t] and vicomtesse.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Early modern and contemporary usage3.1 Belgium 3.2 United Kingdom3.2.1 Ireland 3.2.2 Use as a courtesy title 3.2.3 Coronet3.3 Jersey 3.4 Portugal 3.5 Spain4 Equivalent titles4.1 Germanic counterparts 4.2 Non-Western counterparts5 See also 6 ReferencesEtymology[edit] The word viscount comes from
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Baronet
A baronet (/ˈbærənɪt/ or /ˈbærəˌnɛt/;[1] abbreviated Bart or Bt[1]) or the rare female equivalent, a baronetess (/ˈbærənɪtɪs/,[2] /ˈbærənɪtɛs/,[3] or /ˌbærəˈnɛtɛs/;[4] abbreviation Btss), is the holder of a baronetcy, a hereditary title awarded by the British Crown. The practice of awarding baronetcies was originally introduced in England in the 14th century and was used by James I of England
James I of England
in 1611 as a means of raising funds. A baronetcy is the only British hereditary honour that is not a peerage, with the exception of the Anglo-Irish
Anglo-Irish
Black Knight, White Knight
Knight
and Green Knight
Knight
(of which only the Green Knight
Knight
is extant)
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Lady
The word lady is a civil term of respect for a woman among English speakers. It is the equivalent of gentleman. It is also a formal title in the United Kingdom. "Lady" is used before the surname of a woman with a title of nobility or honorary title suo jure, or the wife of a lord, a baronet, and a knight, and also before the first name of the daughter of a Duke, Marquess, or Earl
Earl
throughout the United Kingdom. Once used to describe only women of a high social class, race, community, and status in Europe; now the term is commonly used to refer to any adult woman among English-speakers globally
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Ritter
Ritter
Ritter
(German for "knight") is a designation used as a title of nobility in German-speaking areas. Traditionally it denotes the second-lowest rank within the nobility, standing above "Edler" and below "Freiherr" (Baron). For its historical association with warfare and the landed gentry in the Middle Ages, it can be considered roughly equal to the titles of "Knight" or "Baronet". As with most titles and designations within the nobility in German-speaking areas, the rank was normally hereditary and generally was used with the nobiliary particle of von or zu before a family name. The wife of a Ritter
Ritter
was called a "Frau" (in this sense "Lady") and not Ritterin. In the Austrian Empire
Austrian Empire
the title of " Ritter
Ritter
von" was bestowed upon citizens who deserved more than the plain "von" but were not considered deserving enough as to be given a barony as "Freiherr"
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Dame
Dame
Dame
is an honorific title and the feminine form of address for the honour of knighthood in the British honours system and the systems of several other Commonwealth countries, such as Australia
Australia
and New Zealand, with the masculine form of address being Sir
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Edler
Edler
Edler
(German: [ˈeːdlɐ]) was until 1919 the lowest rank of nobility in Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
and Germany, just beneath a Ritter
Ritter
(hereditary knight), but above untitled nobles, who used only the nobiliary particle von before their surname. It was mostly given to civil servants and military officers, as well as those upon whom the lower rank of an Order had been conferred. The noun Edler
Edler
comes from the adjective edel ("noble"), and translated literally means "noble [person]". In accordance with the rules of German grammar, the word can also appear as Edle, Edlem, or Edlen depending on case, gender, and number. Originally, from the Middle Ages, under the feudal system (in Europe and elsewhere), the nobility were generally those who held a fief, often in the form of heritable land worked by vassals
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Laird
Laird
Laird
(/ˈlɛərd/) is a generic name for the owner of a large, long-established Scottish estate, roughly equivalent to an esquire in England, yet ranking above the same in Scotland. In the Scottish order of precedence, a laird ranks below a baron and above a gentleman. This rank is only held by those lairds holding official recognition in a territorial designation by the Lord
Lord
Lyon King
King
of Arms
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Châtelain
Châtelain
Châtelain
(Med. Lat. castellanus, from castellum, a castle) was originally merely the French equivalent of the English castellan, i.e. the commander of a castle. With the growth of the feudal system, however, the title gained in France
France
a special significance which it never acquired in England, as implying the jurisdiction of which the castle became the centre. The châtelain was originally, in Carolingian
Carolingian
times, an official of the count; with the development of feudalism the office became a fief, and so ultimately hereditary
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Jonkheer
Jonkheer
Jonkheer
(female equivalent: jonkvrouw; French: Écuyer) is a honorific in the Low Countries
Low Countries
denoting the lowest rank within the nobility. In the Netherlands, this in general concerns a prefix used by the untitled nobility. In Belgium, this is the lowest title within the nobility system, recognised by the Court of Cassation.[1][citation needed] It is the cognate and equivalent of the German noble honorific Junker, which was historically used throughout the German-speaking part of Europe, and to some extent also within Scandinavia.Contents1 Honorific
Honorific
of nobility 2 Title of nobility 3 Coronet 4 Nickname 5 See also 6 References Honorific
Honorific
of nobility[edit] Jonkheer
Jonkheer
or jonkvrouw is literally translated as "young lord" or "young lady"
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