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Embayment
A bay is a recessed, coastal body of water that directly connects to a larger main body of water, such as an ocean, lake, or another bay.[1][2][3] A large bay is usually called a gulf, sea, sound, or bight. A cove is a type of smaller bay with a circular inlet and narrow entrance. A fjord is a particularly steep bay shaped by glacial activity. Bays can be the estuary of a river, such as the Chesapeake Bay, an estuary of the Susquehanna River.[2] Bays may also be nested within each other; for example, James Bay
James Bay
is an arm of Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
in northeastern Canada. Some large bays, such as the Bay of Bengal
Bay of Bengal
and the Hudson Bay, have varied marine geology. The land surrounding a bay often reduces the strength of winds and blocks waves. Bays were significant in the history of human settlement because they provided safe places for fishing
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Bay (other)
A bay is an area of water bordered by land on three sides. Bay, Bays or baying may also refer to:Contents1 Places 2 Animals and plants2.1 Animals 2.2 Plants3 Architecture and interior design 4 Arts, entertainment, and media4.1 Radio stations 4.2 Other arts, entertainment, and media5 Businesses 6 Transport 7 Other uses 8 See alsoPlaces[edit]Bay, Arkansas, USA Bay, Haute-Saône, a commune of France in the Haute-Saône department Bay, Laguna, a municipality in the Philippines Bay
Bay
River, a river in this localityBay, Missouri, USA Bay, Somalia Bay
Bay
County, Florida, USA Bay
Bay
County, Michigan, USA Bays, Kentucky, USA Bays, Ohio, USA Chesapeake Bay, an estuary in District of Columbia and the U.S. states of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia Jamaica Bay, in Queens, New York Morecambe Bay, the largest intertidal bay in England San Francisco Bay, a shallow estuary in the U.S
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Gulf Of Guinea
The Gulf of Guinea
Guinea
is the northeasternmost part of the tropical Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
between Cape Lopez
Cape Lopez
in Gabon, north and west to Cape Palmas in Liberia.[2] The intersection of the Equator
Equator
and Prime Meridian (zero degrees latitude and longitude) is in the gulf. Among the many rivers that drain into the Gulf of Guinea
Guinea
are the Niger and the Volta. The coastline on the gulf includes the Bight of Benin and the Bight of Bonny.Contents1 Name 2 Geography2.1 Islands in the Gulf of Guinea3 See also 4 References 5 External linksName[edit] The origin of the name Guinea
Guinea
is thought to be an area in the region, although the specifics are disputed
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Wave
In physics, a wave is a disturbance that transfers energy through matter or space, with little or no associated mass transport. Waves consist, instead, of oscillations or vibrations of a physical medium or a field, around relatively fixed locations. There are two main types of waves: mechanical and electromagnetic. Mechanical waves propagate through a physical matter, whose substance is being deformed. Restoring forces then reverse the deformation. For example, sound waves propagate via air molecules colliding with their neighbors. When the molecules collide, they also bounce away from each other (a restoring force). This keeps the molecules from continuing to travel in the direction of the wave. Electromagnetic waves
Electromagnetic waves
do not require a medium. Instead, they consist of periodic oscillations of electrical and magnetic fields originally generated by charged particles, and can therefore travel through a vacuum
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Human Settlement
In geography, statistics and archaeology, a settlement, locality or populated place is a community in which people live. A settlement can range in size from a small number of dwellings grouped together to the largest of cities with surrounding urbanized areas. Settlements may include hamlets, villages, towns and cities
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Fishing
Fishing
Fishing
is the activity of trying to catch fish. Fish
Fish
are normally caught in the wild. Techniques for catching fish include hand gathering, spearing, netting, angling and trapping. Fishing
Fishing
may include catching aquatic animals other than fish, such as molluscs, cephalopods, crustaceans, and echinoderms
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Trade
Trade
Trade
involves the transfer of goods or services from one person or entity to another, often in exchange for money. A system or network that allows trade is called a market. The original form of trade, barter, saw the direct exchange of goods and services for other goods and services.[1][need quotation to verify] Barter
Barter
involves trading things without the use of money.[1] Later one bartering party started to involve precious metals, which gained symbolic as well as practical importance. Modern traders generally negotiate through a medium of exchange, such as money. As a result, buying can be separated from selling, or earning. The invention of money (and later credit, paper money and of non-physical money) greatly simplified and promoted trade
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Anchor
An anchor is a device, normally made of metal, used to connect a vessel to the bed of a body of water to prevent the craft from drifting due to wind or current. The word derives from Latin
Latin
ancora, which itself comes from the Greek ἄγκυρα (ankura).[1][2] Anchors can either be temporary or permanent. Permanent anchors are used in the creation of a mooring, and are rarely moved; a specialist service is normally needed to move or maintain them
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Port
A port is a maritime commercial facility which may comprise one or more wharves where ships may dock to load and discharge passengers and cargo
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United Nations Convention On The Law Of The Sea
The United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
(UNCLOS), also called the Law of the Sea Convention or the Law of the Sea treaty, is the international agreement that resulted from the third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS III), which took place between 1973 and 1982. The Law of the Sea Convention defines the rights and responsibilities of nations with respect to their use of the world's oceans, establishing guidelines for businesses, the environment, and the management of marine natural resources. The Convention, concluded in 1982, replaced four 1958 treaties. UNCLOS came into force in 1994, a year after Guyana became the 60th nation to ratify the treaty.[1] As of June 2016[update], 167 countries and the European Union
European Union
have joined in the Convention
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Plate Tectonics
Plate tectonics
Plate tectonics
(from the Late Latin
Late Latin
tectonicus, from the Greek: τεκτονικός "pertaining to building")[1] is a scientific theory describing the large-scale motion of seven large plates and the movements of a larger number of smaller plates of the Earth's lithosphere, since tectonic processes began on Earth
Earth
between 3 and 3.5 billion years ago. The model builds on the concept of continental drift, an idea developed during the first decades of the 20th century. The geoscientific community accepted plate-tectonic theory after seafloor spreading was validated in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The lithosphere, which is the rigid outermost shell of a planet (the crust and upper mantle), is broken into tectonic plates. The Earth's lithosphere is composed of seven or eight major plates (depending on how they are defined) and many minor plates
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Pangaea
Pangaea
Pangaea
or Pangea ( /pænˈdʒiːə/[1]) was a supercontinent that existed during the late Paleozoic
Paleozoic
and early Mesozoic
Mesozoic
eras.[2][3] It assembled from earlier continental units approximately 335 million years ago, and it began to break apart about 175 million years ago.[4] In contrast to the present Earth
Earth
and its distribution of continental mass, much of Pangaea
Pangaea
was in the southern hemisphere and surrounded by a superocean, Panthalassa
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Ria
A ria (/riːə/ or /riə/)[1] is a coastal inlet formed by the partial submergence of an unglaciated river valley. It is a drowned river valley that remains open to the sea. Typically, rias have a dendritic, treelike outline although they can be straight and without significant branches. This pattern is inherited from the dendritic drainage pattern of the flooded river valley. The drowning of river valleys along a stretch of coast and formation of rias results in an extremely irregular and indented coastline. Often, there are islands, which are summits of partly submerged, pre-existing hill peaks. A ria coast is a coastline having several parallel rias separated by prominent ridges, extending a distance inland.[2][3][4] The sea level change that caused the submergence of a river valley may be either eustatic (where global sea levels rise), or isostatic (where the local land sinks)
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Marine Geology
Marine geology
Marine geology
or geological oceanography is the study of the history and structure of the ocean floor. It involves geophysical, geochemical, sedimentological and paleontological investigations of the ocean floor and coastal zone. Marine geology
Marine geology
has strong ties to geophysics and to physical oceanography. Marine geological studies were of extreme importance in providing the critical evidence for sea floor spreading and plate tectonics in the years following World War II
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Headland
A headland (or simply head) is a coastal landform, a point of land usually high and often with a sheer drop, that extends out into a body of water. It is a type of promontory. A headland of considerable size often is called a cape.[1] Headlands are characterised by high, breaking waves, rocky shores, intense erosion, and steep sea cliffs. Headlands and bays
Headlands and bays
are often found on the same coastline. A bay is flanked by land on three sides, whereas a headland is flanked by water on three sides. Headlands and bays
Headlands and bays
form on discordant coastlines, where bands of rock of alternating resistance run perpendicular to the coast
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Gulf Of California
The Gulf of California
Gulf of California
(also known as the Sea of Cortez, Sea of Cortés or Vermilion Sea; locally known in the Spanish language
Spanish language
as Mar de Cortés or Mar Bermejo or Golfo de California) is a marginal sea of the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
that separates the Baja California Peninsula
Baja California Peninsula
from the Mexican mainland. It is bordered by the states of Baja California, Baja California
Baja California
Sur, Sonora, and Sinaloa
Sinaloa
with a coastline of approximately 4,000 km (2,500 mi). Rivers which flow into the Gulf of California
Gulf of California
include the Colorado, Fuerte, Mayo, Sinaloa, Sonora, and the Yaqui
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