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Kazakhstan

Kazakhstan,[c] officially the Republic of Kazakhstan,[d][4][13] is a transcontinental country mainly located in Central Asia with a smaller portion west of the Ural in Eastern Europe. It is the world's largest landlocked country, and the ninth-largest country in the world, with an area of 2,724,900 square kilometres (1,052,100 sq mi).[4][14] Kazakhstan is the most dominant nation of Central Asia economically, generating 60% of the region's GDP, primarily through its oil and gas industry. It also has vast mineral resources.[15] Kazakhstan is officially a democratic, secular, unitary, constitutional republic with a diverse cultural heritage.[16] Kazakhstan shares borders with Russia in the north, China in the east, and Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan, and Turkmenistan in the south, while also adjoining a large part of the Caspian Sea in the southwest
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South Korea

South Korea's mixed economy[308][309][310] ranks 11th nominal[311] and 13th purchasing power parity GDP in the world, identifying it as one of the G-20 major economies. It is a developed country with a high-income economy and is the most industrialized member country of the OECD. South Korean brands such as LG Electronics and Samsung are internationally famous and garnered South Korea's reputation for its quality electronics and other manufactured goods.[312] Its massive investment in education has taken the country from mass illiteracy to a major international technological powerhouse
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External Debt
External loan (or foreign debt) is the total debt which the residents of a country owe to foreign creditors; its complement is internal debt which is owed to domestic lenders. The debtors can be the government, corporations or citizens of that country. The debt includes money owed to private commercial banks, foreign governments, or international financial institutions such as the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and World Bank. Note that the use of gross liability figures greatly distorts the ratio for countries which contain major money centers such as the United Kingdom due to London's role as a financial capital
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List Of Countries By Public Debt
These are lists of countries by public debt, based on data from the CIA's World Factbook and the IMF. Net debt figure is the cumulative total of all government borrowings less repayments that are denominated in a country's home currency.[further explanation needed] Gross government debt is the total amount of debt the government has issued and is the most relevant data for discussions of government default and debt ceilings. It is different from external debt, which includes the foreign currency liabilities of non-government entities. Net debt subtracts financial assets a government holds from the gross debt amount. Net debt would decrease by about one-third of GDP. The public debt relative information provided by national sources (CIA) is not always objective and true, given the fact that there is no independent research in these matters
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United States
Coordinates: 40°N 100°W / 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 According to the International Monetary Fund, the U.S. GDP of $16.8 trillion constitutes 24% of the gross world product at market exchange rates and over 19% of the gross world product at purchasing power parity.[377][378] The United States is the largest importer of goods and second-largest exporter,[379] though exports per capita are relatively low. In 2010, the total U.S
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Market Economy
A market economy is an economic system in which the decisions regarding investment, production and distribution are guided by the price signals created by the forces of supply and demand. The major characteristic of a market economy is the existence of factor markets that play a dominant role in the allocation of capital and the factors of production.[1][2] Market economies range from minimally regulated free-market and laissez-faire systems where state activity is restricted to providing public goods and services and safeguarding private ownership,[3] to interventionist forms where the government plays an active role in correcting market failures and promoting social welfare
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