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Dyshidrosis
Dyshidrosis, is a type of dermatitis, that is characterized by itchy blisters on the palms of the hands and bottoms of the feet.[5] Blisters are generally one to two millimeters in size and heal over three weeks.[6][7] However, they often recur.[7] Redness is not usually present.[6] Repeated attacks may result in fissures and skin thickening.[6] The cause is unknown.[7] Triggers may include allergens, physical or mental stress, frequent hand washing, or metals.[7] Diagnosis is typically based on what it looks like and the symptoms.[7] Allergy testing and culture may be done to rule out other problems.[7] Other conditions that produce similar symptoms include pustular psoriasis and scabies.[6] Avoiding triggers may be useful as may a barrier cream.[6] Treatment is generally with steroid cream.[7] High strength steroid creams may be required for the first week or two.[6]
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Specialty (medicine)
A specialty, or speciality, in medicine is a branch of medical practice. After completing medical school, physicians or surgeons usually further their medical education in a specific specialty of medicine by completing a multiple year residency to become a medical specialist.[1]Contents1 History of medical specialization 2 Classification of medical specialization 3 Specialties that are common worldwide 4 List of specialties recognized in the European Union and European Economic Area 5 List of North American medical specialties and others 6 Physician
Physician
compensation 7 Specialties by country7.1 Australia and New Zealand 7.2 Canada 7.3 Germany 7.4 India 7.5 United States 7.6 Specialty and Physician
Physician
Location8 Other uses 9 Training 10 Satisfaction 11 See also 12 ReferencesHistory of medical specialization[edit] To a certain extent, medical practitioners have always been specialized
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Histamine Antagonist
Antihistamines are drugs which treat allergic rhinitis and other allergies.[1] Antihistamines can give relief when a person has nasal congestion, sneezing, or hives because of pollen, dust mites, or animal allergy.[1] Typically people take antihistamines as an inexpensive, generic, over-the-counter drug with few side effects.[1] As an alternative to taking an antihistamine, people who suffer from allergies can instead avoid the substance which irritates them.[1] Antihistamines are usually for short-term treatment.[1] Chronic allergies increase the risk of health problems which antihistamines might not treat, including asthma, sinusitis, and lower respiratory tract infection.[1] Doctors recommend that people talk to them before any longer term use of antihistamines.[1] Although typical people use the word “antihistamine” to describe drugs for treating allergies, doctors and scientists use the term to describe a class of drug that opposes the activity of histamine receptors in the bo
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Chocolate
Chocolate
Chocolate
(from náhuatl: xocolātl ) (/ˈtʃɒklɪt, -kəlɪt, -lət, ˈtʃɔːk-/ ( listen)) is a typically sweet, usually brown food preparation of Theobroma cacao
Theobroma cacao
seeds, roasted and ground. It is made in the form of a liquid, paste, or in a block, or used as a flavoring ingredient in other foods. Cacao has been cultivated by many cultures for at least three millennia in Mesoamerica. The earliest evidence of use traces to the Olmecs (Mexico), with evidence of chocolate beverages dating back to 1900 BCE.[1] The majority of Mesoamerican
Mesoamerican
people made chocolate beverages, including the Maya and Aztecs.[2] The seeds of the cacao tree have an intense bitter taste and must be fermented to develop the flavor. After fermentation, the beans are dried, cleaned, and roasted
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Coffee
Coffee
Coffee
is a brewed drink prepared from roasted coffee beans, which are the seeds of berries from the Coffea
Coffea
plant. The genus Coffea
Coffea
is native to tropical Africa (specifically having its origin in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and Sudan) and Madagascar, the Comoros, Mauritius, and Réunion
Réunion
in the Indian Ocean.[2] The plant was exported from Africa to countries around the world. Coffee
Coffee
plants are now cultivated in over 70 countries, primarily in the equatorial regions of the Americas, Southeast Asia, India, and Africa. The two most commonly grown are arabica and robusta. Once ripe, coffee berries are picked, processed, and dried. Dried coffee seeds (referred to as beans) are roasted to varying degrees, depending on the desired flavor
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Spices
A spice is a seed, fruit, root, bark, or other plant substance primarily used for flavoring, coloring or preserving food. Spices are distinguished from herbs, which are the leaves, flowers, or stems of plants used for flavoring or as a garnish. Many spices have antimicrobial properties
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Balsam Of Peru
Balsam
Balsam
of Peru, also known and marketed by many other names, is a balsam derived from a tree known as Myroxylon, which is grown in Central America
Central America
(primarily in El Salvador) and South America.[1] Balsam
Balsam
of Peru is used in food and drink for flavoring, in perfumes and toiletries for fragrance, and in medicine and pharmaceutical items for healing properties. It has a sweet scent
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Corticosteroid
Corticosteroids are a class of steroid hormones that are produced in the adrenal cortex of vertebrates, as well as the synthetic analogues of these hormones. Two main classes of corticosteroids, glucocorticoids and mineralocorticoids, are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including stress response, immune response, and regulation of inflammation, carbohydrate metabolism, protein catabolism, blood electrolyte levels, and behavior.[1] Some common naturally occurring steroid hormones are cortisol (C 21H 30O 5), corticosterone (C 21H 30O 4), cortisone (C 21H 28O 5) and aldosterone (C 21H 28O 5)
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Potassium Permanganate
Potassium
Potassium
permanganate is an inorganic chemical compound and medication. As a medication it is used for cleaning wounds and dermatitis.[2] It has the chemical formula KMnO4 and is a salt consisting of K+ and MnO− 4 ions. It is a strong oxidizing agent
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Staphylococcus Aureus
Staphylococcus
Staphylococcus
aureus (also known as golden staph) is a Gram-positive, round-shaped bacterium that is a member of the Firmicutes, and it is a member of the normal flora of the body, frequently found in the nose, respiratory tract, and on the skin. It is often positive for catalase and nitrate reduction and is a facultative anaerobe that can grow without the need for oxygen.[1] Although S. aureus is not always pathogenic (and can commonly be found existing as a commensal), it is a common cause of skin infections including abscesses, respiratory infections such as sinusitis, and food poisoning. Pathogenic strains often promote infections by producing virulence factors such as potent protein toxins, and the expression of a cell-surface protein that binds and inactivates antibodies. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is a worldwide problem in clinical medicine
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Dapsone
Dapsone, also known as diaminodiphenyl sulfone (DDS),[1] is an antibiotic commonly used in combination with rifampicin and clofazimine for the treatment of leprosy.[2] It is a second-line medication for the treatment and prevention of pneumocystis pneumonia and for the prevention of toxoplasmosis in those who have poor immune function.[2] Additionally, it has been used for acne, dermatitis herpetiformis, and various other skin conditions.[3] Dapsone
Dapsone
is available both topically and by mouth.[4] Severe side effects may include: a decrease in blood cells, red blood cell breakdown especially in those with glucose-6-phosphate deh
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Antibacterial
Antibiotics
Antibiotics
(from ancient Greek αντιβιοτικά, antibiotiká), also called antibacterials, are a type of antimicrobial[1] drug used in the treatment and prevention of bacterial infections.[2][3] They may either kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria
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Fexofenadine
Fexofenadine, sold under the trade name Allegra among others[1] is an antihistamine pharmaceutical drug used in the treatment of allergy symptoms, such as hay fever and urticaria.[4] Therapeutically, fexofenadine is a selective peripheral H1-blocker. Fexofenadine
Fexofenadine
is classified as a second-generation antihistamine because it is less able to pass the blood-brain barrier and cause sedation, compared to first-generation antihistamines.[5][6] It has also been called a third-generation antihistamine, although there is some controversy associated with the use of the term.[7]
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Dermatology
Dermatology
Dermatology
(from ancient Greek δέρμα, derma which means skin and λογία, logia) is the branch of medicine dealing with the skin, nails, hair and its diseases.[1][2] It is a specialty with both medical and surgical aspects.[3][4][5] A dermatologist treats diseases, in the widest sense,[6] and some cosmetic problems of the skin, scalp, hair, and nails.[2][7]Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Training3.1 United States 3.2 United Kingdom4 Fields4.1 Cosmetic dermatology 4.2 Dermatopathology 4.3 Immunodermatology 4.4 Mohs surgery 4.5
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Alitretinoin
Alitretinoin, or 9-cis-retinoic acid, is a form of vitamin A. It is also used in medicine as an antineoplastic (anti-cancer) agent developed by Ligand Pharmaceuticals. It is a first generation retinoid. Ligand gained Food and Drug Administration
Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) approval for alitretinoin in February 1999.Contents1 Medical uses1.1 Kaposi’s sarcoma 1.2 Chronic hand eczema2 Adverse effects2.1 Adverse effects by frequency 2.2 Contraindications 2.3 Interactions 2.4 Overdose3 Mechanism of action 4 References 5 External linksMedical uses[edit] Kaposi’s sarcoma[edit] In the United States, topical alitretinoin (in the form of a gel; trade name Panretin) is indicated for the treatment of skin lesions in AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma
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Basilea Pharmaceutica
Basilea Pharmaceutica is a multinational specialty biopharmaceutical company headquartered in Basel, Switzerland.[1] It was formed as a spin-off entity from the drug giant Hoffmann–La Roche in October 2000. It is engaged in the development of antibiotics, antifungals and oncology drugs for treatment of invasive aspergillosis and invasive mucormycosis. Basilea is publicly traded on the SIX Swiss exchange (SIX:BSLIN). The company is based in Basel, Switzerland
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