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Dighavapi
Dighavapi
Dighavapi
(Pali, "long reservoir") is a Buddhist sacred shrine and an archaeological site in the Ampara District
Ampara District
of Sri Lanka, boasting of historical records dating back to the 3rd century BCE. Water reservoirs, called "tanks", were an important feature of the hydraulic civilization of ancient Lanka, and temples and cities were built around them. The importance of Dighavapi
Dighavapi
is connected with legends about visits to this site by the Buddha himself, and many allusions to Dighavapi
Dighavapi
in the ancient chronicles as well as in the Pali
Pali
literature. It has also played a role in the political history of the region
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Sri Lanka
Coordinates: 7°N 81°E / 7°N 81°E / 7; 81Democratic Socialist Republic
Republic
of Sri Lanka ශ්‍රී ලංකා ප්‍රජාතාන්ත්‍රික සමාජවාදී ජනරජය (Sinhalese) Srī Lankā prajātāntrika samājavādī janarajaya இலங்கை ஜனநாயக சோசலிச குடியரசு (Tamil) Ilaṅkai jaṉanāyaka sōsalisa kuṭiyarasuFlagEmblemAnthem: "Sri
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Gautama Buddha
Gautama Buddha[note 3] (c. 563/480 – c. 483/400 BCE), also known as Siddhārtha Gautama,[note 4] Shakyamuni Buddha,[4][note 5] or simply the Buddha, after the title of Buddha, was an ascetic (śramaṇa) and sage,[4] on whose teachings Buddhism
Buddhism
was founded.[5] He is believed to have lived and taught mostly in the eastern part of ancient India sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE.[6][note 6] Gautama taught a Middle Way
Middle Way
between sensual indulgence and the severe asceticism found in the śramaṇa movement[7] common in his region. He later taught throughout other regions of eastern India
India
such as Magadha
Magadha
and Kosala.[6][8] Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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Department Of Archaeology (Sri Lanka)
The Department of Archaeology (Sinhalese: පුරාවිද්‍යා දෙපාර්තමේන්තුව, translit. Purāvidyā Depārtamēntuva, Tamil: தொல்பொருளியல் திணைக்களம், translit. Tolporuḷiyal Tiṇaikkaḷam) is a non-ministerial government department in Sri Lanka responsible for managing the archaeological heritage.Contents1 History 2 Archaeological Commissioner 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] On 7 July 1890 the Governor of Ceylon, Sir Arthur Gordon, appointed Harry Charles Purvis Bell
Harry Charles Purvis Bell
as the first Archaeological Commissioner and Head of the Archaeological Survey of Ceylon. The Survey consisted of the Commissioner, a European assistant commissioner, a native assistant, a clerk, and three draughtsmen
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Tsunami
A tsunami (from Japanese: 津波, "harbour wave";[1] English pronunciation: /tsuːˈnɑːmi/ tsoo-NAH-mee[2]) or tidal wave, also known as a seismic sea wave, is a series of waves in a water body caused by the displacement of a large volume of water, generally in an ocean or a large lake.[3] Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.[4] Unlike normal ocean waves, which are generated by wind, or tides, which are generated by the gravitational pull of the Moon and the Sun, a tsunami is generated by the displacement of water. Tsunami
Tsunami
waves do not resemble normal undersea currents or sea waves because their wavelength is far longer.[5] Rather than appearing as a breaking wave, a tsunami may instead initially resemble a rapidly rising tide
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Arab
Historically: Arabian mythology (Hubal · al-Lāt · Al-‘Uzzá · Manāt · Other Goddesses) Predominantly: Islam (Sunni · Shia · Sufi · Ibadi · Alawite · Ismaili) Sizable minority: Christianity (Eastern Orthodox · Maronite · Coptic Orthodox · Greek Orthodox · Greek Catholic · Chaldean Christian) Smaller minority: Other monotheistic religions (Druze · Bahá'í Faith · Sabianism · Bábism · Mandaeism)Related ethnic groupsOther Afroasiatic-speaking peoplesa Arab
Arab
ethnicity should not be confused with non- Arab
Arab
ethnicities that are also native to the Arab
Arab
world.[30] b Not all Arabs
Arabs
are Muslims
Muslims
and not all Muslims
Muslims
are Arabs
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Burgher People
Burgher people, also known simply as Burghers, are a small Eurasian ethnic group in Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
descended from Portuguese, Dutch, British[2][3] and other European men who settled in Sri Lanka[4][5] and developed relationships with native Sri Lankan women.[6] The Portuguese and Dutch had held some of the maritime provinces of the island for centuries before the advent of the British Empire.[7][8][9] With the establishment of Ceylon
Ceylon
as a crown colony at the end of the 18th century, most of those who retained close ties with the Netherlands
Netherlands
departed
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Batticaloa
Batticaloa
Batticaloa
(Tamil: மட்டக்களப்பு, Maṭṭakkaḷappu; Sinhalese: මඩකලපුව, Madakalapuwa) is a major city in the Eastern Province, Sri Lanka, and its former capital. It is the administrative capital of the Batticaloa
Batticaloa
District. The city is the seat of the Eastern University of Sri Lanka
Sri Lanka
and is a major commercial city. It is on the east coast, 69 miles (111 km) south of Trincomalee, and is situated on an island
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Dutch East India Company
The Dutch East India
India
Company, officially the United East India
India
Company (Dutch: Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie; VOC) was an early megacorporation founded by a government-directed amalgamation of several rival Dutch trading companies (voorcompagnieën) in the early 17th century.[1][2] It was established on March 20, 1602, as a chartered company to trade with Mughal India[3] during the period of proto-industrialization,[4] from which 50% of textiles and 80% of silks were imported, chiefly from its most developed region known as Bengal Subah.[5][6][7][8][9] In addition, the company Indianised Southeast Asian countries when the Dutch government granted it a 21-year monopoly on the Dutch spice trade. It has been often labelled a trading company (i.e. a company of merchants who buy and sell goods produced by other people) or sometimes a shipping company
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Portugal
Portugal
Portugal
(Portuguese pronunciation: [puɾtuˈɣaɫ]), officially the Portuguese Republic
Republic
(Portuguese: República Portuguesa [ʁɛˈpuβlikɐ puɾtuˈɣezɐ]),[note 1] is a sovereign state located mostly on the Iberian Peninsula
Iberian Peninsula
in southwestern Europe. It is the westernmost country of mainland Europe, bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and to the north and east by Spain
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Netherlands
The Netherlands
Netherlands
(Dutch: Nederland, [ˈneːdərlɑnt] (listen)), informally Holland,[11] is a country in Northwestern Europe with some overseas territories in the Caribbean. In Europe, it consists of 12 provinces that border Germany
Germany
to the east, Belgium
Belgium
to the south, and the North Sea
North Sea
to the northwest, with maritime borders in the North Sea
North Sea
with those countries and the United Kingdom.[12] Together with three island territories in the Caribbean
Caribbean
Sea—Bonaire, Sint Eustatius
Sint Eustatius
and Saba—it forms a constituent country of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The official language is Dutch and a secondary official language in the province of Friesland
Friesland
is West Frisian
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Parakramabahu
Parākramabāhu I (Pali Mahā Parākaramabāhu 1123–1186) was king of the Kingdom of Polonnaruwa from 1153-86. During his reign from the capital city of Polonnaruwa, he unified the three lesser kingdoms of the island, becoming one of the last monarchs in Sri Lankan history to do so. He oversaw the expansion and beautification of his capital, constructed extensive irrigation systems, reorganized the country's army, reformed Buddhist practices, encouraged the arts and undertook military campaigns in South India and Burma. The adage "not even a little water that comes from the rain must flow into the ocean without being made useful to man" is one of his most famous utterances.[1] Parākramabāhu spent much of his youth in the courts of his uncles Kitti Sri Megha, Prince of Dakkinadesa, and Sri Vallabha, Prince of Ruhuna respectively, as well as in the court of the King of Rajarata, Gajabahu II
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Dutugemunu
Dutugamunu
Dutugamunu
(Sinhalese: දුටුගැමුණු, lit. 'දුටුගැමුණු', Tamil: துட்டகாமினி, lit. 'Tuṭṭakāmiṉi', also spelled as Dutthagamani, also known as Dutthagamani Abhaya "fearless Gamini"[1]), was a Sinhalese king of Sri Lanka[2] who reigned from 161 BC to 137 BC. He is renowned for defeating and overthrowing Ellalan, the usurping Tamil prince from the Chola Kingdom, who had invaded the Kingdom of Rajarata
Rajarata
in 205 BC
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Ramayana
Ramayana
Ramayana
(/rɑːˈmɑːjənə/;[1] Sanskrit: रामायणम्, Rāmāyaṇam [ɽaːˈmaːjɐɳɐm]) is one of the two major Sanskrit
Sanskrit
epics of ancient India, the other being the Mahābhārata. Along with the Mahābhārata, it forms the Hindu Itihasa. The epic, traditionally ascribed to the Rishi
Rishi
Valmiki, narrates the life of Rama, the legendary prince of the Kosala
Kosala
Kingdom. It follows his fourteen-year exile to the forest by his father King Dasharatha, on request of his step-mother Kaikeyi
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Geographic Coordinate System
A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols.[note 1] The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation.[1] To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.[2]Contents1 History 2 Geodetic datum 3 Horizontal coordinates3.1 Latitude
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