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Description
Description is the pattern of development[clarification needed] that presents a word picture of a thing, a person, a situation, or a series of events. It is one of four rhetorical modes (also known as modes of discourse), along with exposition, argumentation, and narration. Each of the rhetorical modes is present in a variety of forms and each has its own purpose and conventions. The act of description may be related to that of definition. Description is also the fiction-writing mode for transmitting a mental image of the particulars of a story.[citation needed]Contents1 As a fiction-writing mode 2 Purple prose 3 Philosophy 4 Physics 5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksAs a fiction-writing mode[edit] Fiction
Fiction
is a form of narrative, one of the four rhetorical modes of discourse
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James F. Conant
James Ferguson Conant (born June 10, 1958) is an American philosopher who has written extensively on topics in philosophy of language, ethics, and metaphilosophy. He is perhaps best known for his writings on Wittgenstein, and his association with the New Wittgenstein school of Wittgenstein interpretation initiated by Cora Diamond.[1] He is currently Chester D. Tripp Professor of Humanities, Professor of Philosophy, and Professor in the College at the University of Chicago and Humboldt Professor of Philosophy and co-director of the Center for Analytic German Idealism at Leipzig University.Contents1 Life 2 Academic work 3 Awards 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLife[edit] Conant was born in Kyoto, Japan
Kyoto, Japan
to American parents. He is the grandson of former Harvard University
Harvard University
president James Bryant Conant. At 14, he attended Phillips Exeter Academy. He received his A.B
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J. L. Austin
John Langshaw "J. L." Austin (26 March 1911 – 8 February 1960) was a British philosopher of language and leading proponent of ordinary language philosophy, perhaps best known for developing the theory of speech acts.[3] Austin pointed out that we use language to do things as well as to assert things, and that the utterance of a statement like "I promise to do so-and-so" is best understood as doing something — making a promise — rather than making an assertion about anything
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Feeling
Feeling
Feeling
is the nominalization of the verb to feel.[1] The word was first used in the English language
English language
to describe the physical sensation of touch through either experience or perception. The word is also used to describe experiences other than the physical sensation of touch, such as "a feeling of warmth"[2] and of sentience in general. In Latin, sentire meant to feel, hear or smell. In psychology, the word is usually reserved for the conscious subjective experience of emotion.[3] Phenomenology and heterophenomenology are philosophical approaches that provide some basis for knowledge of feelings
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Pathos
Pathos (/ˈpeɪθɒs/, US: /ˈpeɪθoʊs/; plural: pathea; Greek: πάθος, for "suffering" or "experience"; adjectival form: 'pathetic' from παθητικός) represents an appeal to the emotions of the audience, and elicits feelings that already reside in them.[1] Pathos is a communication technique used most often in rhetoric (where it is considered one of the three modes of persuasion, alongside ethos and logos), and in literature, film and other narrative art. Emotional appeal can be accomplished in a multitude of ways:by a metaphor or storytelling, commonly known as a hook, by passion in the delivery of the speech or writing, as determined by the audience. Personal anecdoteContents1 Aristotle
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Anthropomorphism
Anthropomorphism
Anthropomorphism
is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.[1] It is considered to be an innate tendency of human psychology.[2] Personification is the related attribution of human form and characteristics to abstract concepts such as nations, emotions and natural forces like seasons and the weather. Both have ancient roots as storytelling and artistic devices, and most cultures have traditional fables with anthropomorphized animals as characters
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Cliché
A cliché or cliche (/ˈkliːʃeɪ/ or /klɪˈʃeɪ/) is an expression, idea, or element of an artistic work which has become overused to the point of losing its original meaning or effect, even to the point of being trite or irritating, especially when at some earlier time it was considered meaningful or novel.[1] In phraseology, the term has taken on a more technical meaning, referring to an expression imposed by conventionalized linguistic usage
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DeScribe
Shneur Hasofer (Hebrew: שניאור הסופר‎), better known by his stage name DeScribe ("Hasofer" translating from Hebrew as "the scribe"), is an Australian-born Israeli singer-songwriter who lives in the United States. His music combines elements of pop, dance, and reggae.Contents1 Biography1.1 Personal life 1.2 Career2 Artistic style 3 Discography3.1 EPs and albums 3.2 Singles/appearances4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Personal life[edit] DeScribe was born in Sydney, to a Hasidic Jewish family. His mother, Devorah Hasofer, is a singer/songwriter who has released four albums and performs primarily in the Hasidic communities in Australia and Israel.[1] A drummer since the age of five, in his preteen years he participated in the recordings of his mother's albums and performed with her as a special guest.[2] At the age of 14, Hasofer's parents sent him to Jerusalem to study in a yeshiva
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A. J. Ayer
Sir Alfred Jules "Freddie" Ayer, FBA (/ɛər/;[2] 29 October 1910 – 27 June 1989),[3] usually cited as A. J. Ayer, was a British philosopher known for his promotion of logical positivism, particularly in his books Language, Truth, and Logic
Language, Truth, and Logic
(1936) and The Problem of Knowledge
Knowledge
(1956). He was educated at Eton College
Eton College
and Oxford University, after which he studied the philosophy of logical positivism at the University of Vienna
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Analytic Philosophy
Analytic philosophy
Analytic philosophy
(sometimes analytical philosophy) is a style of philosophy that became dominant in the west at the beginning of the 20th century. In the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand
New Zealand
and Scandinavia, the majority of university philosophy departments today identify themselves as "analytic" departments.[1] The term "analytic philosophy" can refer to one of several things:As a philosophical practice,[2][3] it is characterized by an emphasis on argumentative clarity and precision, often making use of formal logic, conceptual analysis, and, to a lesser degree, mathematics and the natural sciences.[4][5][6] As a historical development, analytic philosophy refers to certain developments in early 20th-century philosophy that were the historical antecedents of the current practice. Central figures in this historical development are Bertrand Russell, Ludwig Wittgenstein, G. E
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Verisimilitude
Verisimilitude (or truthlikeness) is a philosophical concept that distinguishes between the relative and apparent (or seemingly so) truth and falsity of assertions and hypotheses.[1] The problem of verisimilitude is the problem of articulating what it takes for one false theory to be closer to the truth than another false theory.[2][3] This problem was central to the philosophy of Karl Popper, largely because Popper was among the first to affirm that truth is the aim of scientific inquiry while acknowledging that most of the greatest scientific theories in the history of science are, strictly speaking, false.[4] If this long string of purportedly false theories is to constitute progress with respect to the goal of truth, then it must be at least possible for one false theory to be closer to the truth than others.Contents1 Karl Poppe
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Objectification
In social philosophy, objectification is the act of treating a person, or sometimes an animal,[1] as an object or a thing. It is part of dehumanization, the act of disavowing the humanity of others. Sexual objectification, the act of treating a person as a mere object of sexual desire, is a subset of objectification, as is self-objectification, the objectification of one's self
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Personification
Anthropomorphism
Anthropomorphism
is the attribution of human traits, emotions, or intentions to non-human entities.[1] It is considered to be an innate tendency of human psychology.[2] Personification is the related attribution of human form and characteristics to abstract concepts such as nations, emotions and natural forces like seasons and the weather. Both have ancient roots as storytelling and artistic devices, and most cultures have traditional fables with anthropomorphized animals as characters
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Referential Density
Referential density is a concept of ficto-narrative theory put forward by Thomas G. Pavel in his 1986 book, Fictional Worlds.[1] The concept refers to the referential relationship of a text to a fictional world, the ontology of which can be established by a possible worlds approach.[2] A large text that refers to a small fictional world is said to have low referential density, whereas a small text referring to a large fictional world has high referential density. The size of the text is measured in abstract terms as amplitude, which in most cases will correspond to its physical length; exceptions to this may arise in cases of embedded discourses, such as metanarratives (or imaging digressions), which refer to the actual world. For this reason, the form and genre of a fictional work provide only an approximate indication of its size; by the same token, it is possible to refer to the size and referential density of part of a fictional work
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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