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Description
DESCRIPTION is the pattern of development that presents a word picture of a thing, a person, a situation, or a series of events. It is one of four rhetorical modes (also known as _modes of discourse_), along with exposition , argumentation , and narration . Each of the rhetorical modes is present in a variety of forms and each has its own purpose and conventions . The act of description may be related to that of definition . Description is also the fiction-writing mode for transmitting a mental image of the particulars of a story . CONTENTS * 1 As a fiction-writing mode * 2 Purple prose * 3 Philosophy * 4 Physics * 5 See also * 6 Notes * 7 References * 8 External links AS A FICTION-WRITING MODE Fiction is a form of narrative , one of the four rhetorical modes of discourse. Fiction-writing also has modes: action , exposition, description, dialogue , summary, and transition. Author Peter Selgin refers to _methods_, including action, dialogue, thoughts, summary, scenes , and description. Currently, there is no consensus within the writing community regarding the number and composition of fiction-writing modes and their uses. Description is the fiction-writing mode for transmitting a mental image of the particulars of a story. Together with dialogue, narration, exposition, and summarization, description is one of the most widely recognized of the fiction-writing modes
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Description (other)
A DESCRIPTION of something (such as an object, a person, or an event) is a written or spoken account presenting characteristics and aspects of that which is being described in sufficient detail that the audience can form a mental picture, impression, or understanding of it. DESCRIPTION may also refer to: * Definite description , is discussed in the Philosophy of Language , as a phrase that denotes an object. * Description
Description
(linguistics) , analyzing and describing how language is spoken by a group of people in a speech community * Description
Description
, a rhetorical mode * Mathematical model
Mathematical model
, a description in mathematical language of a system * Scientific theory , a description of an aspect of the natural world * Species description , is a formal description of a newly defined species in biological taxonomy This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title DESCRIPTION. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the intended article. Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Description_(other) additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy .® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc
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DeScribe
SHNEUR HASOFER (Hebrew : שניאור הסופר‎‎), better known by his stage name DESCRIBE ("Hasofer" translating from Hebrew as "the scribe"), is an Australian-born Israeli singer-songwriter who currently lives in the United States. His music combines elements of pop, dance, and reggae. CONTENTS* 1 Biography * 1.1 Personal life * 1.2 Career * 2 Artistic style * 3 Discography * 3.1 EPs & Albums * 3.2 Singles/appearances * 4 References * 5 External links BIOGRAPHYPERSONAL LIFE DeScribe
DeScribe
was born in Sydney, Australia , to a Hasidic Jewish family. His mother, Devorah Hasofer, is a singer/songwriter who has released four albums and performs primarily in the Hasidic communities in Australia and Israel. A drummer since the age of five, in his preteen years he participated in the recordings of his mother's albums and performed with her as a special guest. At the age of 14, Hasofer’s parents sent him to Jerusalem
Jerusalem
to study in a yeshiva . He spent a year in the yeshiva and then, remaining in Israel, he “left the Jewish way of life and did a lot of stupid things,” many of which were illegal. His family’s move to Beitar Illit in 1998 did little to curb his wildness
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Rhetorical Modes
RHETORICAL MODES (also known as MODES OF DISCOURSE) describe the variety, conventions, and purposes of the major kinds of language -based communication , particularly writing and speaking . Four of the most common rhetorical modes and their purpose are narration , description , exposition , and argumentation . CONTENTS * 1 Narration * 2 Description * 3 Exposition * 4 Argumentation * 5 Fiction-writing modes * 6 See also * 7 Notes * 8 References * 9 External links NARRATION This section NEEDS ADDITIONAL CITATIONS FOR VERIFICATION . Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (September 2014) (Learn how and when to remove this template message )The purpose of narration is to tell a story or narrate an event or series of events. This writing mode frequently uses the tools of descriptive writing. Narration is an especially useful tool for sequencing or putting details and information into some kind of logical order, usually chronological. Working with narration helps us see clear sequences separate from all other mental functions. Examples include: * Anecdotes * Autobiography * Biography * Novels * Oral history * Short story DESCRIPTION This section DOES NOT CITE ANY SOURCES . Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources . Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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Exposition (literary Technique)
NARRATIVE EXPOSITION is the insertion of important background information within a story ; for example, information about the setting , characters' backstories , prior plot events, historical context, etc. In a specifically literary context, exposition appears in the form of expository writing embedded within the narrative. Exposition is one of four rhetorical modes (also known as _modes of discourse_), along with description , argumentation , and narration , as elucidated by Alexander Bain and John Genung. Each of the rhetorical modes is present in a variety of forms, and each has its own purpose and conventions . There are several ways to accomplish exposition. INDIRECT EXPOSITION/INCLUINGINDIRECT EXPOSITION, sometimes called INCLUING, is a technique of worldbuilding in which the reader is gradually exposed to background information about the world in which a story is set. The idea is to _clue_ the readers in to the world the author is building without them being aware of it. This can be done in a number of ways: through dialogues , flashbacks , characters' thoughts, background details, in-universe media, or the narrator telling a backstory . Instead of saying "I am a woman", a first person narrator can say "I kept the papers inside my purse." The reader (in most English-speaking cultures) now knows the character is probably female
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Argumentation
ARGUMENTATION THEORY, or ARGUMENTATION, is the interdisciplinary study of how conclusions can be reached through logical reasoning ; that is, claims based, soundly or not, on premises . It includes the arts and sciences of civil debate, dialogue , conversation, and persuasion . It studies rules of inference , logic , and procedural rules in both artificial and real world settings. Argumentation includes debate and negotiation which are concerned with reaching mutually acceptable conclusions. It also encompasses eristic dialog, the branch of social debate in which victory over an opponent is the primary goal. This art and science is often the means by which people protect their beliefs or self-interests in rational dialogue, in common parlance, and during the process of arguing. Argumentation is used in law , for example in trials, in preparing an argument to be presented to a court, and in testing the validity of certain kinds of evidence. Also, argumentation scholars study the post hoc rationalizations by which organizational actors try to justify decisions they have made irrationally
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Narrative Mode
NARRATION is the use of a written or spoken commentary to convey a story to an audience . Narration encompasses a set of techniques through which the creator of the story presents their story, including: * NARRATIVE POINT OF VIEW: the perspective (or type of personal or non-personal "lens") through which a story is communicated * NARRATIVE VOICE: the format (or type presentational form) through which a story is communicated * NARRATIVE TIME: the grammatical placement of the story's time-frame in the past, the present, or the future.A NARRATOR is a personal character or a non-personal voice that the creator (author) of the story develops to deliver information to the audience, particularly about the plot . In the case of most written narratives (novels, short stories, poems, etc.), the narrator typically functions to convey the story in its entirety. The narrator may be a voice devised by the author as an anonymous, non-personal, or stand-alone entity; as the author as a character; or as some other fictional or non-fictional character appearing and participating within their own story. The narrator is considered participant if he/she is a character within the story, and non-participant if he/she is an implied character or an omniscient or semi-omniscient being or voice that merely relates the story to the audience without being involved in the actual events
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Convention (norm)
A CONVENTION is a set of agreed, stipulated, or generally accepted standards, norms , social norms , or criteria, often taking the form of a custom . Certain types of rules or customs may become law and regulatory legislation may be introduced to formalize or enforce the convention (for example, laws that define on which side of the road vehicles must be driven). In a social context , a convention may retain the character of an "unwritten law" of custom (for example, the manner in which people greet each other, such as by shaking each other's hands). In physical sciences , numerical values (such as constants, quantities, or scales of measurement) are called conventional if they do not represent a measured property of nature, but originate in a convention, for example an average of many measurements, agreed between the scientists working with these values. CONTENTS * 1 General * 2 Customary or social conventions * 2.1 Social * 3 Government * 4 International law * 5 See also * 6 References * 7 External links GENERALA convention is a selection from among two or more alternatives, where the rule or alternative is agreed upon among participants. Often the word refers to unwritten customs shared throughout a community. For instance, it is conventional in many societies that strangers being introduced shake hands
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Definition
A DEFINITION is a statement of the meaning of a term (a word , phrase , or other set of symbols ). Definitions can be classified into two large categories, intensional definitions (which try to give the essence of a term) and extensional definitions (which proceed by listing the objects that a term describes). Another important category of definitions is the class of ostensive definitions , which convey the meaning of a term by pointing out examples. A term may have many different senses and multiple meanings, and thus require multiple definitions. In mathematics , a definition is used to give a precise meaning to a new term, instead of describing a pre-existing term. Definitions and axioms are the basis on which all of mathematics is constructed
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Fiction-writing Modes
A FICTION-WRITING MODE is a manner of writing with its own set of conventions regarding how, when, and where it should be used. Fiction
Fiction
is a form of narrative , one of the four rhetorical modes of discourse. Fiction-writing also has distinct forms of expression, or modes, each with its own purposes and conventions. Currently, there is no consensus within the writing community regarding the number and composition of fiction-writing modes and their uses. Some writing modes suggested include action, dialogue, thoughts, summary, scene, description, background, exposition and transition. CONTENTS * 1 Overview * 2 Narration * 3 Description
Description
* 4 Exposition * 5 Summarization * 6 Introspection * 7 Recollection
Recollection
* 8 Sensation * 9 Emotion * 10 Action * 11 Transition * 12 Categories * 13 See also * 14 Footnotes * 15 References OVERVIEWThe concept goes back at least as far as Aristotle who, in Poetics, referred to narration and action as different modes or manner of representing something. For many years, fiction writing was described has having two types: narration and dialogue. Evan Marshall, in The Marshall Plan for Novel
Novel
Writing
Writing
(1998) noted that writers should know what they are doing at all times
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Imagination
IMAGINATION, also called the faculty of IMAGINING, is the creative ability to form images, ideas, and sensations in the mind without any immediate input of the senses (such as seeing or hearing). Imagination helps make knowledge applicable in solving problems and is fundamental to integrating experience and the learning process . A basic training for imagination is listening to storytelling (narrative ), in which the exactness of the chosen words is the fundamental factor to "evoke worlds". It is accepted as the innate ability and process of inventing partial or complete personal realms within the mind from elements derived from sense perceptions of the shared world. The term is technically used in psychology for the process of reviving in the mind, percepts of objects formerly given in sense perception. Since this use of the term conflicts with that of ordinary language , some psychologists have preferred to describe this process as "imaging" or "imagery" or to speak of it as "reproductive" as opposed to "productive" or "constructive" imagination. Constructive imagination is further divided into voluntary top-down imagination driven by the prefrontal cortex , that is called mental synthesis , and spontaneous bottom up involuntary generation of novel images that occurs during dreaming. Imagined images, both novel and recalled, are seen with the "mind\'s eye "
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Narrative
A NARRATIVE or STORY is a report of connected events, real or imaginary , presented in a sequence of written or spoken words, or still or moving images , or both. The word derives from the Latin verb narrare, "to tell", which is derived from the adjective gnarus, "knowing" or "skilled". Narrative
Narrative
can be organized in a number of thematic or formal categories: non-fiction (such as definitively including creative non-fiction , biography , journalism , transcript poetry , and historiography ); fictionalization of historical events (such as anecdote , myth , legend , and historical fiction ); and fiction proper (such as literature in prose and sometimes poetry , such as short stories , novels , and narrative poems and songs , and imaginary narratives as portrayed in other textual forms, games, or live or recorded performances). Narrative
Narrative
is found in all forms of human creativity, art, and entertainment, including speech , literature , theatre , music and song , comics , journalism , film , television and video , video games , radio , gameplay , unstructured recreation , and performance in general, as well as some painting , sculpture , drawing , photography , and other visual arts , as long as a sequence of events is presented. Several art movements, such as modern art , refuse the narrative in favor of the abstract and conceptual. Oral storytelling is the earliest method for sharing narratives
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Fiction
FICTION is the classification for any story or setting that is imaginary —in other words, not based strictly on history or fact. Fiction can be expressed in a variety of formats, including writings , live performances , films , television programs , animations , video games , and role-playing games , though the term originally and most commonly refers to the narrative forms of literature (see _literary_ fiction ), including novels , novellas , short stories , and plays . Fiction is occasionally used in its narrowest sense to mean simply any "literary narrative". A work of fiction is an act of creative imagination, so its total faithfulness to reality is not typically assumed by its audience. Therefore, fiction is not expected to present only characters who are actual people or descriptions that are factually accurate. Instead, the context of fiction, not adhering precisely to the real world, is generally open to interpretation . Characters and events within a fictional work may even be openly set in their own context entirely separate from the known universe: a fictional universe that stands on its own. Fiction is regarded as the traditional opposite of non-fiction , whose creators assume responsibility for presenting only the historical and factual truth; however, the distinction between fiction and non-fiction can be blurred, for example, in postmodern literature
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Action (fiction)
ACTION FICTION is the literary genre that includes spy novels , adventure stories, tales of terror and intrigue ("cloak and dagger "), and mysteries . This kind of story utilizes suspense , the tension that is built up when the reader wishes to know how the conflict between the protagonist and antagonist is going to be resolved or what the solution to the puzzle of a thriller is. CONTENTS * 1 Genre fiction * 2 See also * 3 Notes * 4 References GENRE FICTION Action fiction is a form of genre fiction whose subject matter is characterized by emphasis on exciting action sequences. This does not always mean they exclude character development or story-telling. Action fiction, is related to other forms of fiction , including action films , action games and analogous media in other formats such as manga and anime . It includes martial arts action, extreme sports action, car chases and vehicles, suspense action, and action comedy , with each focusing in more detail on its own type and flavour of action. It is usually possible to tell from the creative style of an action sequence, the emphasis of an entire work, so that, for example, the style of a combat sequence will indicate whether the entire work can be classified as action adventure, or a martial work. Action is mainly defined by a central focus on any kind of exciting movement
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Dialogue In Writing
DIALOGUE, in fiction, is a verbal exchange between two or more characters. If there is only one character talking aloud, it is a monologue . CONTENTS * 1 Identifiers * 2 See also * 3 Notes * 4 References * 5 External links IDENTIFIERS"This breakfast is making me sick," George said. The George said is the identifier. Said is the verb most writers use because reader familiarity with said prevents it from drawing attention to itself. Although other verbs such as ask, shout, or reply are acceptable, some identifiers get in the reader's way. For example: "Hello," he croaked nervously, "my name's Horace." "What's yours?" he asked with as much aplomb as he could muster. another example is: "My name is Peg, what's yours?" I asked. "My name is William, but my friends call me Will," said Will. Stephen King , in his book On Writing , expresses his belief that said is the best identifier to use. King recommends reading a novel by Larry McMurtry
Larry McMurtry
, who he claims has mastered the art of well-written dialogue. Substitutes are known as said-bookisms. For example, in the sentence "What do you mean?" he smiled., the word smiled is a said-bookism. SEE ALSO * Exposition * Fiction writing * Pace * Show, Don\'t Tell NOTES * ^ Turco (1989 , p. 16) * ^ King (2000 , p
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Peter Selgin
PETER SELGIN (born 1957) is an American novelist, short story writer, playwright, essayist, editor, and illustrator. Selgin teaches at Antioch University's Low-Residency MFA Creative Writing Program and is Assistant Professor of English at Georgia College in Milledgeville, Georgia. CONTENTS * 1 Biography * 2 Works * 3 Awards * 4 Books * 5 Notes * 6 References * 7 External links BIOGRAPHYA son of Italian immigrants, Peter Selgin was born in Bethesda, Maryland , grew up in Bethel, Connecticut , and attended Bethel High School . From an early age, he showed considerable talent in visual art and theater, going on to attend the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn
Brooklyn
, New York , where he studied film, theater and visual art, before turning to writing. After stints in community theater, he later attended Bard College
Bard College
, and earned his Bachelor of Arts in English from Western Connecticut State University . For years, between writing plays and stories, he worked as a visual artist—including as a caricaturist , illustrator , and painter . Nerve damage to his hand from a dog attack in 1981 temporarily sidelined his career
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